Annie Laurie Mills1

F, #10891, b. circa 1876

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 11 Dec 2019

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 5048b - Mary MacIsaac.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1881; Census Place: Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia; Roll: C_13176; Page: 33; Family No: 143
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

Alma May Mills1

F, #10892, b. circa 1878

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 11 Dec 2019

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 5048b - Mary MacIsaac.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1881; Census Place: Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia; Roll: C_13176; Page: 33; Family No: 143
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

Donald Kennedy1

M, #10893, b. circa 1835

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Margaret (?) b. c 1847

  • Last Edited: 15 Dec 2019

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 3774a - Archibald D Kennedy.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1891; Census Place: Strathlorn, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada; Roll: T-6317; Family No: 2
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1891 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.
  2. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 3774b - Archibald D Kennedy.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1881; Census Place: Strathlorne, Inverness, Nova Scotia; Roll: C_13165; Page: 1; Family No: 1
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

Margaret (?)1

F, #10894, b. circa 1847

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Donald Kennedy b. c 1835

  • Last Edited: 15 Dec 2019

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 3774a - Archibald D Kennedy.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1891; Census Place: Strathlorn, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada; Roll: T-6317; Family No: 2
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1891 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.
  2. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 - 3774b - Archibald D Kennedy.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1881; Census Place: Strathlorne, Inverness, Nova Scotia; Roll: C_13165; Page: 1; Family No: 1
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1881 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.

Heribert (?) Graf von Glieberg1

M, #10895, b. circa 930, d. 992

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67246.htm#i672452
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67194.htm#i671933
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67326.htm#i673253
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p397.htm#i3970

Ermintrud vom Avalgau1

F, #10896, b. circa 952

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p397.htm#i3970

Udo I (?) Graf in der Wetterau1

M, #10897, b. circa 896, d. 12 December 949

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67194.htm#i671933
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67263.htm#i672622
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67257.htm#i672562
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67326.htm#i673253

unknown (?) von Vermandois1

F, #10898, b. circa 895

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Udo I (?) Graf in der Wetterau b. c 896, d. 12 Dec 949

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67326.htm#i673253

Gebhard Herzog von Lothringen1

M, #10899, b. circa 865, d. 29 June 910

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Hidda (?) von Keldaggau b. c 870, d. 19 Nov 896

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67263.htm#i672622
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67193.htm#i671922
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67257.htm#i672562

Hidda (?) von Keldaggau1

F, #10900, b. circa 870, d. 19 November 896

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Gebhard Herzog von Lothringen b. c 865, d. 29 Jun 910

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67257.htm#i672562

Udo III (?) Graf im Lahngau1

M, #10901, b. circa 830, d. after 879

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Udo III (?) Graf im Lahngau was born circa 830 in Germany*.1
  • Death*: He died after 879 in Germany*.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67193.htm#i671922
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67192.htm#i671919

Gebhard I (?) Graf im Lahngau1

M, #10902, b. circa 800, d. after 879

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gebhard I (?) Graf im Lahngau was born circa 800 in Germany*.1
  • Death*: He died after 879 in Germany*.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67192.htm#i671919
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67193.htm#i671921
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67199.htm#i671985

Udo II (?) Graf im Niederlahngau1

M, #10903, b. circa 770, d. after 831

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Udo II (?) Graf im Niederlahngau was born circa 770 in Germany*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Rothildis (?) circa 800 in Germany*.2
  • Death*: Udo II (?) Graf im Niederlahngau died after 831 in Germany*.1

Family: Rothildis (?) b. c 780, d. a 831

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67193.htm#i671921
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67199.htm#i671985

Rothildis (?)1

F, #10904, b. circa 780, d. after 831

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Udo II (?) Graf im Niederlahngau b. c 770, d. a 831

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p67199.htm#i671985

Christian I Oldenburg King of Denmark and Norway1

M, #10905, b. circa February 1426, d. 21 May 1481

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Christian I Oldenburg King of Denmark and Norway was born circa February 1426 in Oldenburg, Germany.1
  • Marriage*: He married Dorethea von Hohezolleran on 26 October 1449 in Copenhagen, Denmark.2
  • Death*: Christian I Oldenburg King of Denmark and Norway died on 21 May 1481 in Copenhagen, Denmark.1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 21 May 1481 in Chapel of the Magi at Roskilde Cathedral, Roskild, Island of Zealand, Denmark.3
  • Biography*: Christian I (February 1426 – 21 May 1481) was a Scandinavian monarch under the Kalmar Union. He was king of Denmark (1448–1481), Norway (1450–1481) and Sweden (1457–1464). From 1460 to 1481, he was also duke of Schleswig (within Denmark) and count (after 1474, duke) of Holstein (within the Holy Roman Empire). He was the first king of the House of Oldenburg.

    In the power vacuum that arose following the death of King Christopher of Bavaria (1416–1448) without a direct heir, Sweden elected Charles VIII of Sweden (1408–1470) king with the intent to reestablish the union under a Swedish king. Charles was elected king of Norway in the following year. However the counts of Holstein made the Danish Privy Council appoint Christian as king of Denmark. His subsequent accessions to the thrones of Norway (in 1450) and Sweden (in 1457), restored the unity of the Kalmar Union for a short period. In 1463, Sweden broke away from the union and Christian's attempt at a reconquest resulted in his defeat to the Swedish regent Sten Sture the Elder at the Battle of Brunkeberg in 1471.

    In 1460, following the death of his uncle, Duke Adolphus of Schleswig, Count of Holstein, Christian also became Duke of Schleswig and Count of Holstein.

    Biography
    Early years
    Christian I was born in February 1426 in Oldenburg in Northern Germany as the eldest son of Count Dietrich of Oldenburg by his second wife, Helvig of Holstein (died 1436). Christian had two younger brothers, Maurice (1428–1464) and Gerhard (1430–1500), and one sister Adelheid.

    Through his father, he belonged to the House of Oldenburg, a comital family established since the 12th century in an area west of the River Weser in north-western Germany. Based on the two strongholds of Oldenburg and Delmenhorst, the family had gradually expanded its rule over the neighbouring Frisian tribes of the area. Christian's father was called the Fortunate as he had reunited and expanded the family's territory. Christian's mother, Helvig, was a daughter of Gerhard VI, Count of Holstein, and a sister of Adolphus, Duke of Schleswig. Through his mother, Christian was also a cognatic descendant of King Eric V of Denmark through his second daughter Richeza and also a cognatic descendant of King Abel of Denmark through his daughter Sophie. Through his father, Christian was a cognatic descendant of King Eric IV of Denmark through his daughter Sophia. Christian thus descended from the three surviving sons of Valdemar II and his second wife Berengaria of Portugal.

    At the death of their father in 1440, Christian and his brothers jointly succeeded Dietrich as Count of Oldenburg and Delmenhorst. Christian was raised by his uncle, Duke Adolphus of Schleswig, Count of Holstein (1401–1459) as the childless duke wished for his young nephew to become his heir, and also succeeded in having Christian elected as his successor in the Duchy of Schleswig.

    King of Denmark

    In January 1448, King Christopher of Denmark, Sweden and Norway died suddenly and without natural heirs. His death resulted in the break-up of the union of the three kingdoms, as Denmark and Sweden went their separate ways and Norway's affiliation was unclear. The vacant Danish throne was first offered by the Council of the Realm to Duke Adolphus of Schleswig, being the most prominent feudal lord of Danish dominions. The duke declined and recommended his nephew, Count Christian of Oldenburg. Before being elected, Christian had to promise to obey to the Constitutio Valdemariana, a provision in the ascension promissory of King Valdemar III of Denmark, that promised that in the future, the same person could never be both ruler of the Duchy of Schleswig and Denmark simultaneously. The council also demanded that Christian should marry dowager queen Dorothea of Brandenburg (ca 1430–1495), widow of his predecessor King Christopher III. On 1 September 1448, after signing his ascension promissory, count Christian was elected to the Danish throne as king Christian I at the assembly in Viborg. His coronation was held on 28 October 1449, in the Church of Our Lady in Copenhagen, at which occasion his marriage with dowager queen Dorothea was also celebrated.

    King of Sweden and Norway

    Meanwhile, Sweden had on 20 June 1448 elected Charles (VIII) as king of Sweden. Norway was now faced with the choice between a union with Denmark or Sweden, or electing a separate king. The latter option was quickly discarded, and a power-struggle ensued between the supporters of Christian of Denmark and Charles of Sweden. The Norwegian Council of the Realm was divided. In February 1449, a part of the Council declared in favour of Charles as king, but on 15 June the same year, a different group of councillors paid homage to Christian. On 20 November, Charles was crowned king of Norway in Trondheim.

    However, the Swedish nobility now took steps to avoid war with Denmark. In June 1450, the Swedish Council of the Realm forced Charles to renounce his claim on Norway to King Christian. In the summer of 1450, Christian sailed to Norway with a large fleet, and on 2 August he was crowned king of Norway in Trondheim. On 29 August, a union treaty between Denmark and Norway was signed in Bergen. Norway had of old been a hereditary monarchy, but this had become less and less a reality, as at the last royal successions, hereditary claims had been bypassed for political reasons. It was now explicitly stated that Norway, as well as Denmark, was an elective monarchy. The treaty stipulated that Denmark and Norway should have the same king in perpetuity, and that he would be elected among the legitimate sons of the previous king, if such existed.

    Charles Knutsson became increasingly unpopular as king of Sweden, and was driven into exile in 1457. Christian achieved his aim of being elected as king of Sweden, thus re-establishing the Kalmar Union. He received the power from temporary Swedish regents Archbishop Jöns Bengtsson Oxenstierna and lord Erik Axelsson Tott. However, Sweden being volatile and split by factions (benefits of union being against nationalistic benefits), his reign there ended in 1464 when Kettil Karlsson Vasa, Bishop of Linköping was installed as the next regent. Charles Knutsson was recalled as King of Sweden, although he was later exiled a second time, recalled again and died during his third term as king. Christian's final attempt at regaining Sweden ended in a total military failure at Brunkeberg (outside Stockholm) October 1471 where he was defeated by forces on Swedish regent Sten Sture the Elder (Sten Sture den äldre). Christian maintained his claim to the Swedish kingdom up to his death in 1481.

    Duke and Count
    In 1460 King Christian also became Duke of Schleswig, a Danish fief, and Count of Holstein-Rendsburg, a Saxe-Lauenburgian subfief within the Holy Roman Empire. Christian inherited Holstein-Rendsburg and Schleswig after a short "interregnum" as the eldest son of the sister of late Duke Adolphus VIII, Duke of Schleswig (Southern Jutland) and Count of Holstein, of the Schauenburg fürst clan, who died 4 December 1459, without heirs. Christian's succession was confirmed by the Estates of the Realm (nobility and representatives) of these duchies in Ribe 5 March 1460 (Treaty of Ribe). In 1474 Lauenburg's liege lord Emperor Frederick III elevated Christian I as Count of Holstein to Duke of Holstein, thus becoming an immediate imperial vassal (see imperial immediacy).

    Later reign

    Christian's personal territory was at its largest in 1460–64, before the loss of Sweden. However, many parts of his realm wanted to govern themselves locally, and there were constant struggles. Denmark was his most important center of power.

    In 1474 Christian travelled two times: in April he went to Milan (his stay in Lombardy is celebrated by frescoes by Il Romanino in the Malpaga Castle) and Rome, in Italy, where he met Pope Sixtus IV. In that occasion, his wife received by the pope the authorization to found a university in Copenhagen, which would be created in 1478 or 1479. In the autumn same year he visited Charles of Burgundy, acting as intermediary between him and future emperor Maximilian I. He stayed in Burgundy for several months, moving to the Netherlands in the early 1475.

    Death and burial

    King Christian died at Copenhagen Castle on 21 May 1481 at the age of 55. He was interred at the Chapel of the Magi at Roskilde Cathedral, a richly decorated chapel he and Queen Dorothea had erected to serve as a family sepulchral chapel for the House of Oldenburg. The burials of Christian I and Queen Dorothea are marked with a pair of simple stones, as the chapel itself was to be considered their sepulchral monument.

    Legacy
    The dynasty he founded, the House of Oldenburg, remained on the throne of Denmark, and was on the throne of Norway until 1814 and returned again from 1905.3

Family: Dorethea von Hohezolleran b. 1430, d. 10 Nov 1495

  • Last Edited: 26 Jan 2020

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102469
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102470
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_I_of_Denmark

Dorethea von Hohezolleran1

F, #10906, b. 1430, d. 10 November 1495

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Dorethea von Hohezolleran was born in 1430 in Germany*.1
  • Marriage*: She married Christian I Oldenburg King of Denmark and Norway on 26 October 1449 in Copenhagen, Denmark.1
  • Married Name: As of 26 October 1449,her married name was Oldenburg.1
  • Death*: Dorethea von Hohezolleran died on 10 November 1495 in Roskilde, Denmark.1
  • Biography*: Dorothea of Brandenburg (1430/1431 – 10 November 1495) was Queen of Denmark (1445–1448 and 1449–1481), Queen of Norway (1445–1448 and 1450–1481) and Queen of Sweden (1447–1448 and 1457–1464) by her marriages to King Christopher III and King Christian I. She served as interim regent during the interregnum in 1448, and as regent in the absence of her second spouse during his reign.

    She was the mother of two future kings of Denmark: John, King of Denmark who reigned from 1481 until 1513; Frederick I of Denmark who reigned from 1523 until 1533.

    Early life
    Dorothea was born in 1430 or 1431 to John, Margrave of Brandenburg-Kulmbach, and Barbara of Saxe-Wittenberg (1405–1465). She had two sisters: Barbara (1423–1481), who became Marchioness of Mantua, and Elisabeth (14??-1451), who became Duchess of Pomerania. From about the age of eight, she lived in Bayreuth, where her father was ruler. In 1443, Christopher of Bavaria, the newly elected King of Denmark, Sweden and Norway, inherited Oberpfalz close to Bayreuth, and a marriage was suggested between Christopher and Dorothea to secure her father's support for Christopher's power over his German domain. The engagement was proclaimed prior to the application of Papal dispensation for affinity in February 1445, which was approved 10 March.

    Marriage to Christopher of Bavaria
    On 12 September 1445, the wedding ceremony was conducted between Christopher and Dorothea in Copenhagen, followed by the coronation of Dorothea as queen. The King had financed it with a special tax in all three Kingdoms, and the occasion is described as one of the most elaborate in Nordic Medieval history. The festivities lasted for eight days and was attended by the Princes of Braunschweig, Hesse and Bavaria and envoys of the Hanseatic League and the Teutonic Order as well as the nobility of Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Dorothea made her entrance in the city escorted by noblemen from all three Kingdoms dressed in gold riding on white horses, and crowned Queen of Denmark, Sweden and Norway by bishops from all three Kingdoms with the golden crown from the Vadstena Abbey. On 15 September, she was granted dowers in all three Kingdoms: Roskilde, Ringsted, Haraldsborg and Skioldenses in Denmark; Jämtland in Norway, and Örebro, Närke and Värmland in Sweden. Should she chose to live outside of Scandinavia as a widow, she would instead be given a fortune of 45,000 Rhine guilders, one third from each Kingdom.

    Queen Dorothea left for Sweden with the King in January 1446, where they visited Vadstena Abbey and her dower Örebro. During this visit, she met her future antagonist Charles, Lord High Constable of Sweden. According to the chronicle Karlskrönikan, their meeting was a good one during which presented her and her ladies-in-waiting with many gifts. The couple returned to Denmark in September. The marriage between Dorothea and Christopher was politically favorable: her father governed Christopher's German domain and was a loyal supporter and adviser. It did not result in any offspring, however, and according to Ericus Olai, the marriage was in fact not sexually active.

    In January 1448, King Christopher died childless, which resulted in a succession crisis that immediately broke the Kalmar Union of the three Kingdoms. Queen dowager Dorothea, being the only royal in Denmark, was proclaimed interim regent of Denmark until a new monarch could be elected. In Sweden, however, the Lord High Constable was elected as King Charles VIII, who was soon elected king of Norway as well. In September, Christian of Oldenburg was elected monarch as Christian I of Denmark and the queen dowager turned over the power to him upon his election.

    Marriage to Christian I of Denmark
    Queen Dorothea was given a proposal from king Casimir IV of Poland and Albert VI, Archduke of Austria, but she chose to remain in Denmark and marry the newly elected king, Christian I of Denmark. The wedding ceremony was conducted 26 October 1449, followed by the coronation of Christian and herself as king and queen of Denmark. She renounced her existing dower lands in Denmark and Norway, which were replaced with Kalundborg and Samsø in Denmark, and Romerike in Norway, but refused to renounce her Swedish dower lands. The election of Charles as king in Sweden and Norway deprived her of her dower lands in these kingdoms, and her as well as Christian's ambition was to have Christian crowned in Sweden and Norway as well, and thereby reunite the shattered Kalmar Union.

    Christian was crowned in Norway as well in 1450. The task to win back Sweden was more difficult, and Dorothea upheld as several years long campaign recruiting followers among the Swedish clerics and nobility, to which she stated that their elected king Charles VIII, as her former Lord Constable and subject, was to be regarded as an usurper and a traitor who had broken his vow by depriving her, his former queen, of her dower lands in Sweden. In 1455, she also appealed to the Pope. In February 1457 her campaign was crowned with success when the rebellion of Archbishop Jöns Bengtsson Oxenstierna deposed Charles VIII, who fled to Germany, and in July 1457, Christian was elected king of Sweden, thereby again uniting the union of the three Nordic kingdoms. Dorothea made an official entry in Stockholm in December, and her Swedish dower lands was returned to her: in May 1458, further more, the Swedish council approved her and Christian's wish that their sons be secured the succession to the Swedish throne, a position they had already been secured in Denmark and Norway. The king and queen returned to Denmark in July.

    In 1460, Christian bought the Duchy of Schleswig and Holstein, which placed him in debt, forced him to raise taxes and destroyed his support in Sweden, who again elected Charles VIII as king in 1464. The loss of Sweden was reportedly a blow to queen Dorothea, who started a lifelong campaign to have her spouse (and later her son) again elected king of Sweden, to restore the Kalmar Union of the three Kingdoms and to retrieve her Swedish dower lands. The loss of her personal dower lands enabled her to personally pursue the Swedish cause in court, and she sued Charles VIII before the Pope in Rome for depriving her of her dower lands. When Charles VIII was succeeded as the regent of Sweden by Sten Sture the Elder, she pursued her case against him. In 1475, she traveled to Italy and visited her sister Barbara in Mantua, and he Pope Sixtus IV in Rome, and formally applied to have Sten Sture excommunicated. By use of an excommunication, the Swedish regent would be unable to govern and the Swedish kingdom would be economically and politically ruined, which would result in the fall of the Swedish regent and the election of the Danish king as king of Sweden, which was a policy she withheld and worked for her last twenty years.

    In Denmark, queen Dorothea was granted the Slotsloven, which gave her the right to command all the castles in Denmark, and she served as regent whenever the king was absent. Her personal wealth also gave her influence. When king Christian acquired Holstein and Schleswig in 1460 and was unable to pay, she loaned him the amount necessary to buy these domains and incorporate them into Denmark. By 1470, she had de facto seized control over Holstein and Schleswig: when Christian was unable to pay back the loan she had given him to buy the domains, she took over the rule of Holstein (1479) and Schleswig (1480) herself and ruled them as her own fiefs. After the death of her father in 1464, she battled her uncle Frederick II, Elector of Brandenburg, over the inheritance.

    Queen Dorothea has been described as efficient and ambitious, haughty and frugal.

    Queen Dowager
    Christian I died on 21 May 1481 and was succeeded by her son John, King of Denmark. As queen dowager, she preferred to reside at Kalundborg Castle. She remained politically active during the reign of her son until her death. She granted the Duchy of Schleswig-Holstein to her younger son Frederick, but it caused a conflict with her elder son and ended in the division of the Duchy between her sons.

    Dorothea continued with her ambition to reunite the Kalmar Union of the Nordic Kingdoms, now by her having her son elected king of Sweden rather than her spouse, by means of ousting the Swedish regent through an excommunication officially for the theft of her Swedish dower lands. I January 1482, she stated this plan for her son the king, and in 1488, she made a second trip to her sister Barbara in Mantua, meeting the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III in Innsbrück on the way, and visited Pope Innocent VIII in Rome, where she again pressed the matter of an excommunication of the Swedish regent and place the kingdom of Sweden under Interdict. It was with great difficulty that the Swedish envoy in Rome, Hemming Gadh, managed to prevent this. The queen dowager continued this process until her death: the matter was not resolved until three years after her death, when her son, the year prior elected king of Sweden, stated that he did not wish to pursue the matter further. Though she died two years before her son was elected king of Sweden, her work is regarded to have contributed to this outcome.

    Dorothea died on 25 November 1495, and is interred next to her second spouse in Roskilde Cathedral.2

Family: Christian I Oldenburg King of Denmark and Norway b. c Feb 1426, d. 21 May 1481

  • Last Edited: 26 Jan 2020

Daniel MacDonald1

M, #10910, b. circa 1882

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Ranald MacDonald1

M, #10911, b. 1890

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Catherine MacDonald1

F, #10912, b. 1890

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Colin H MacDonald1

M, #10913, b. 1892

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Joseph B MacDonald1

M, #10914, b. 1893

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Amelia MacDonald1

F, #10915, b. 1894

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Maggie E MacDonald1

F, #10916, b. 1896

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 10 Mar 2020

Citations

  1. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, 0861 -1185 - Mary Walker.docx
    Source Citation
    Year: 1901; Census Place: Pictou (Town/Ville), Pictou, Nova Scotia; Page: 4; Family No: 43
    Source Information
    Ancestry.com. 1901 Census of Canada [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.