Reginald Mac Somerled1

M, #2581, b. circa 1143, d. 1207

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Name Variation: Reginald Mac Somerled was also known as Ranald.
  • Birth*: Reginald was born circa 1143 in Islay, Scotland.2,3
  • Marriage*: He married Fonia (?) of Galloway circa 1175.4
  • Burial*: His body was interred in 1207 in Isle of Iona, Scotland.3
  • Death*: Reginald died in 1207 in Scotland.3,5
  • Biography*: On his father's death Reginald received Kintye and Islay.

    Ragnall mac Somairle was a late 12th century and possibly early 13th century magnate, seated on the western seaboard of Scotland. He was likely a younger son of Somairle mac Gilla Brigte, Lord of Argyll (d. 1164) and his wife, Ragnhildr, daughter of Óláfr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles (d. 1153). The 12th century Kingdom of the Isles, ruled by Ragnall's father and maternal-grandfather, existed within a hybrid Norse-Gaelic milieu, which bordered an ever strengthening and consolidating Kingdom of Scots.

    In the mid 12th century, Somairle rose in power and won the Kingdom of the Isles from his brother-in-law. After Somairle perished in battle against the Scots in 1164, much of his kingdom was likely partitioned between his surviving sons. Ragnall's allotment appears to have been in the southern Hebrides and Kintyre. In time, Ragnall appears to have risen in power and became the leading member of Somairle's descendants, the meic Somairle (or Clann Somairle). Ragnall is known to have styled himself "King of the Isles, Lord of Argyll and Kintyre" and "Lord of the Isles". His claim to the title of king, like other members of the meic Somairle, is derived through Ragnhildr, a member of the Crovan dynasty.

    Ragnall disappears from record after he and his sons were defeated by his brother Áengus. Ragnall's death-date is unknown, although dates ranging between 1192–1227 are all possibilities. Surviving contemporary sources reveal that Ragnall was a significant patron of the Church. Although his father appears to have aligned himself with traditional forms of Christianity, Ragnall's associated himself with newer reformed religious orders from the continent. Ragnall's now non-existent seal, which pictured a knight on horseback, also indicates that he attempted to present himself as an up-to-date ruler, not unlink his Anglo-French contemporaries of the bordering Kingdom of Scots.

    Ragnall is known to have left two sons, Domnall and Ruaidrí, who went on to found powerful Hebridean families. Either Ragnall or Ruaidrí had daughters who married Ragnall's first cousins Rögnvaldr and Óláfr, two 13th century kings of the Crovan dynasty.

    Origins of the meic Somairle
    Ragnall was a son of Somairle mac Gilla Brigte, Lord of Argyll (d. 1164) and his wife, Ragnhildr, daughter of Óláfr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles. Somairle and Ragnhildr had at least three sons: Dubgall (d. after 1175), Ragnall, Áengus (d. 1210), and likely a fourth, Amlaíb. Dubgall appears to have been the couple's eldest son. Little is certain of the origins of Ragnall's father, although his marriage suggests that he belonged to a family of some substance. In the first half of the 12th century, the Hebrides and the Isle of Man (Mann) were encompassed within the Kingdom of the Isles, which was ruled by Somairle's father-in-law, a member of the Crovan dynasty. Somairle's rise to power may well have begun at about this time, as the few surviving sources from the era suggest that Argyll may have begun to slip from the control of David I, King of Scots (d. 1153).

    Somairle first appears on record in 1153, when he rose in rebellion against Máel Coluim IV, King of Scots (d. 1165), in support of his nephews and their father, a certain Máel Coluim who was imprisoned by the like-named king. In the same year, Somairle's father-in-law was murdered, after ruling the Kingdom of the Isles about forty years. Óláfr was succeeded by his son, Guðrøðr; sometime afterwards, Somairle participated in a coup within the kingdom by presenting Dubgall as a potential king. In consequence, Somairle and his brother-in-law fought a naval battle in 1156, after which much of the Hebrides appear to have fallen under Somairle's control. Two years later, he defeated Guðrøðar outright and took control of the entire island-kingdom. In 1164, Somairle again rose against the King of Scots, and is recorded in various early sources to have commanded a massive invasion force of men from throughout the Isles, Argyll, Kintyre, and Scandinavian Dublin. Somairle's host sailed up the Clyde, and made landfall near what is today Renfrew, where they were crushed by the Scots, and he himself was slain. Following Somairle's demise, Guðrøðr returned to the Isles and seated himself on Mann, although the Hebridean-territories won by Somairle in 1156 were retained by his descendants, the meic Somairle.

    Although contemporary sources are silent on the matter, it is more than likely that on Somairle's demise, his territory was divided amongst his surviving sons. The precise allotment of lands is unknown; even though the division of lands amongst later generations of meic Somairle can be readily discerned, such boundaries are unlikely to have existed during chaotic 12th century. It is possible that the territory of the first generation of meic Somairle may have stretched from Glenelg in the north, to the Mull of Kintyre in the south; with Áengus ruling in the north, Dubgall centred in Lorne (with possibly the bulk of the inheritance), and Ragnall in Kintyre and the southern islands.

    Internal conflict
    n a charter to Saddell Abbey, Ragnall is styled in Latin rex insularum, dominus de Ergile et Kyntyre ("King of the Isles, Lord of Argyll and Kintyre"). In what is likely a later charter, he is styled in Latin dominus de Inchegal ("Lord of the Isles"), in his grant to Paisley. Although Ragnall's abandonment of he title "king" in favour of "lord" may not be significant, it could be connected with his defeat to Áengus, or possibly due to the rise in power and expansion of his namesake and first cousin, Rögnvaldr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles. Ragnall's style dominus de Inchegal is not unlike the dominus Insularum used by his great-great-grandson, Eoin Mac Domhnaill, Lord of the Isles (d. c. 1387), the first of four successive Lords of the Isles.

    Ragnall's grant to Paisley is preserved in two documents. One dates from the late 12th century or early 13th century, a later copy of the charter is contained in an instrument which dates to 1426. Appended to the latter document is a description of a seal, which the 15th century notary alleged to have belonged to Ragnall. On one side, the seal is described to have depicted a ship, filled with men at arms. On the reverse side, the seal was said to have depicted an armed man on horseback, with a sword in his hand.

    Ragnall is the only member of the meic Somairle known to have styled himself rex insularm ("King of the Isles") in documents. His use of both the title and seal are likely derived from those of the leading members of the Crovan dynasty, such as his namesake Rögnvaldr, who was styled "King of the Isles" and was said to have borne a similar two-sided seal. The elements contained within the seals of the two men combine a Norse-Gaelic galley, a symbol of power of the rulers of an island-kingdom; and the Anglo-French knight, a symbol of feudal society, in which the cult of knighthood had reached its peak in the 12th and early 13th centuries. The use of such seals by leading Norse-Gaelic lords, seated on the periphery of the kingdoms of Scotland and England, illustrates their desire to present themselves as up-to-date and modern to their contemporaries in Anglo-French society.

    The fact that two Hebridean rulers, Ragnall and Rögnvaldr, shared the same personal names, the same grand-father, and (at times) the same title, has perplexed modern historians and possibly mediaeval chroniclers as well.

    In the late 12th century, Haraldr Maddaðarson (d. 1206) set his sights on the Scottish earldom of Ross, and associated himself with the meic Áedha who were in open rebellion against the King of Scots. To keep Haraldr in check, Uilliam I, King of Scots (d. 1214) launched the first of two expeditions into Haraldr's mainland territory in 1196, with one reaching deep into Caithness. According to John of Fordun (d. after 1363), Uilliam's first military action subdued Caithness and Sutherland. The Orkneyinga saga records that Rögnvaldr was tasked by Uilliam to intervene on his behalf, and that Rögnvaldr duly gathered an armed host from the Isles, Kintyre, and Ireland, and went into Caithness and subdued the region. The Chronica of Roger of Howden (d. 1201/2) also notes that Rögnvaldr went into Caithness, and records that he bought the title to the earldom. The precise date of Rögnvaldr's venture is uncertain, although it appears to date to about 1200.

    Although most scholars regard Ragnall's cousin as the Hebridean-king who assisted the King of Scots against Haraldr, several points have been raised which may suggest that it was actually Ragnall. For example, the saga makes the erroneous statement that the Hebridean-king in question was a son of Ingibjörg, who is much more likely to have been Ragnall's maternal-grandmother than Rögnvaldr's; in addition, the saga notes that the king's military force was gathered in part from Kintyre, which may be more likely of Ragnall than his cousin, since Ragnall is known to have styled himself dominus Ergile et Kyntyre. Also, until recently, the transcription of Howden's account of the episode has stated that the Hebridean-king was in fact a son of Somairle. However, a recent re-analysis of the earliest existent version of Howden's chronicle has shown that its original text was altered to include Somairle's name, and that it originally read in Latin Reginaldus filius rex de Man, thereby revealing that Rögnvaldr Guðrøðarson was indeed the man in question.

    There is another instance where an historical source records a man which may have been either Ragnall or Rögnvaldr. The early 13th century Böglunga sögur indicates at one point that men of two Norwegian factions decided to launch a raiding expedition into the Isles. One version of this saga states that Rögnvaldr ("King of Mann and the Isles") and Guðrøðr ("King on Mann") had not paid their taxes due to the Norwegian kings; in consequence, the Isles were ravaged until the two travelled to Norway and reconciled themselves with Ingi Bárðarson, King of Norway (d. 1217), whereupon the two took their lands from Ingi as a fief.

    The mentioned kings of Böglunga sögur are regarded to represent Rögnvaldr and his son, Guðrøðr (d. 1231), although it has been suggested that the saga's "Rögnvaldr" may in fact refer to Ragnall, and that the "Guðrøðr" of the saga may simply refer to Rögnvaldr's patronym.[56] The events depicted in the saga appear to show that, in the wake of destructive Norse activity in the Isles, which may have been some sort of officially sanctioned punishment from Norway, Rögnvaldr and his son (or possibly Ragnall and Rögnvaldr) travelled to Norway where they rendered homage to the Norwegian king, and made compensation for unpaid taxes.

    Ecclesiastical activities
    Iona Abbey
    In the 6th century, exiled-Irishman Colum Cille (d. 527) seated himself on Iona, from where he oversaw the foundation of numerous daughter-houses in the surrounding islands and mainland. Men of his own choosing, many of his extended family, were appointed to administrate these dependent houses; in time, a lasting monastic network—a monastic familia—was centred on the island, led by his successors. With the continued Viking onslaught in the 9th century, the leadership of the familia relocated to Kells.[59] In the 12th century, Flaithbertach Ua Brolcháin, Abbot of Derry (d. 1175), the comarba ("successor") of Colum Cille, relocated from Kells to Derry.

    In 1164, the Annals of Ulster indicate that Somairle attempted to reinstate the monastic familia on Iona, under Flaithbertach's leadership. Unfortunately for Somairle, the proposal was met with significant opposition, and with his death in the same year, his intentions ultimately came to nothing. About forty years later, a Benedictine monastery was founded on Iona. The foundation charter, dating to December 1203, places the monastery under the papal protection of Pope Innocent III (d. 1216). Although the Book of Clanranald claims that Ragnall founded the monastery, the charter reveals that the monastery received endowments from throughout the meic Somairle domain, indicating that the foundation concerned the leading members of the kindred.

    The decision of the meic Somairle to establish a Benedictine house provoked a prompt and violent response from the familia. The Annals of Ulster relate that, after Cellach, Abbot of Iona had built the new monastery on the island in 1204, a large Irish force made landfall and burnt the new buildings to the ground. Immediately afterwards, Cellach was deposed and replaced with a more palatable abbot. Although a contemporary poem echoes the sentiments of the familia, as it portrays Colum Cille cursing the descendants of Somairle, the Benedictine presence on Iona was there to stay. The new monastery nearly obliterated the old monastery of Colum Cille, and sometime after its foundation, an Augustinian nunnery was established just south of the site, with Somairle's daughter, Bethóc, as its first prioress. The oldest building on the island is St Oran's chapel. Judging from certain Irish influences in its architecture, the chapel is thought to date to about the mid 12th century. The building is known to have been used as a mortuary house by Ragnall's later descendants, and it is be possible that either he or his father were responsible for its erection.

    Saddell Abbey
    Either Ragnall or his father could have founded Saddell Abbey, a rather small Cistercian house, situated in the traditional heartland of the meic Somairle. This, now ruinous monastery, is the only Cisterian house known to have been founded in the West Highlands. Surviving evidence from the monastery itself suggests that Ragnall was likely the founder. For example, when the monastery's charters were confirmed in 1393 by Pope Clement VII (d. 1534), and in 1498 and 1508 by James IV, King of Scots (d. 1513), the earliest grant produced by the house was that of Ragnall; furthermore, the confirmations of 1393 and 1508 specifically state that Ragnall was indeed the founder. Clan tradition preserved in the Book of Clanranald also states that Ragnall was the founder of Saddell Abbey. However, evidence that Somairle was the founder may be preserved in a 13th century French list of Cistercian houses, which names a certain "Sconedale" under the year 1160, which may well refer to Saddell.

    One possibility is that, while Somairle may well have began the planning a Cistercian house at Saddell, it was actually Ragnall who provided it with its first endowments. However, Somairle's attempt to relocate the traditional familia on Iona may be evidence that newer reformed orders of continental Christianity, such as the Cistercians and Benedictines, while acceptable to his immediate descendants, were unpalatable to himself. In contrast to his father, Ragnall's known religious endowments reveal that he was not adverse to such orders. During Somairle's career, he waged war upon the Scots and perished in an invasion of Scotland proper; it may be that Ragnall's ecclesiastical activities were undertaken in part to improve relations with the King of Scots.[83] Additionally, in an age when monasteries were often built by rulers as status symbols of their wealth and power, Ragnall's foundations may have been, in part, an attempt to appear as an up-to-date ruler, or king in his own right.

    Diocese of Argyll
    Either Dubgall or Ragnall were instrumental in the creation of the Diocese of Argyll, probably between 1183 and 1189. In the first half of the 12th century, Óláfr (Somarle's father-in-law) founded the Diocese of the Isles, by granting the monks of the Savigniac abbey of St Mary of Furness the right of episcopal election, and endowing this English abbey with lands to establish a daughter-house on Mann. In the mid 12th century, at about the time of Óláfr's death and his son's accession, the diocese became encompassed with the Norwegian Archdiocese of Nidaros. Although a significant proportion of the Óláfr's former kingdom eventually fell under control of the meic Somairle, there is no evidence that the administration of the diocese was altered. Even so, the right of patronage appears to have been contested between the meic Somairle and their cousins of the Crovan dynasty.

    Christian, Bishop of the Isles, an Argyllman, may well have been a meic Somairle candidate in about 1170, although this bishop appears to have been deposed, as Michael (d. 1203), a Manxman, was made Bishop of the Isles during Christian's lifetime. The Diocese of Argyll may have been established by the meic Somairle as a means to freely act as religious patrons, like their cousins of the Crovan dynasty. In fact, Rögnvaldr's resurgence of the dynasty's power in the latter 12th century may well have been a factor in the diocese's creation. Also significant is the fact that, when the Benedictine abbey was founded on Iona in about 1203, the community was made subject to the Vatican, thus leaving the Bishop of the Isles with no authority over the sacred island. Although the early diocese suffered from prolonged vacancies, over time it became firmly established on the mainland, with its cathedral nearby on Lismore, in the heartland of Dubgall's descendants, the meic Dubgaill.

    Death
    The year and circumstances of Ragnall's death are uncertain, as surviving contemporary sources failed to mark his demise. According to 17th and 18th century Hebridean-tradition preserved in the Book of Clanranald, Ragnall may have died in 1207. However, without corroborating evidence, such a late tradition cannot be accepted. Moreover, this particular tradition misplaces his father's death by sixteen years, which may indicate that Ragnall himself was slain some sixteen years earlier. If so, Ragnall's death may be related to his defeat suffered at the hands of brother, in 1192. However, the Chronicle of Mann, which records the 1192 conflict, gives no hint of Ragnall's demise. Another possibility is that Ragnall may have been slain sometime around 1209–1210, during yet more internal conflict amongst the meic Somairle.

    An independent analysis of the Book of Clanranald has shown that, instead of 1207, it may have dated Ragnall's demise to 1227. However, this date is may very well be too late for man who was an adult in 1164. Ragnall's grant to Paisley may leave clues to his fate. This charter was likely granted at about the same time as another by his son, Domnall, which may be evidence that Ragnall had not been killed in the defeat against Áengus. Also, there is reason to believe that, following his grant to the priory, Ragnall may have entered into a confraternity with the monks there. If this charter was indeed granted near the end of his life, then Ragnall may have ended his days at the priory. Since the abbey was not one of the several founded by himself, or the meic Somairle, this may be a clue as to why Ragnall disappears from record after 1192.2,1

Family 1: Fonia (?) of Galloway b. c 1150

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 22 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnall_mac_Somairle
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  4. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p14697.htm#i146969
  6. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 35.
  7. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p14697.htm#i146967

Somerled MacGillebride King of the Isles

M, #2582, b. circa 1110, d. 1164

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Somerled was born circa 1110.
  • Marriage*: He married (?) MacMahon before 1140.1
  • Marriage*: He married Ragnhilde Olafsdotter circa 1140 in Isle of Man.2,1,3,4
  • Death*: Somerled died in 1164 in Near Renfrew, Renfrewshire, Scotland.1,3,5,6
  • Biography*: He gained the title of Thane of Argyll. In 1158 he acquired the Southern Isles or Sudreys by conquest. He gained the title of King Somerled of the Sudreys recognised by the King of Norway. He fought in the camapign against Malcolm IV, King of Scotland in 1164.

    Somerled
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Somerled (Old Norse: Sumarliðr, Scottish Gaelic: Somhairle, commonly Anglicized from Gaelic as Sorley) was a military and political leader of the Scottish Isles in the 12th century who was known in Gaelic as rí Innse Gall ("King of the Hebrides"). His father was Gillebride. The name, a common one amongst the Vikings, means summer traveller and is a kenning for Viking.

    Ancestry

    There are a number of competing versions of Somerled's pedigree in the annals. For example, Dean Monro wrote that:
    This Somerle wes the sone of Gillebryde M’Gilleadam, name Vic Sella, Vic Mearshaighe, Vic Swyffine, Vic Malgheussa, Vic Eacime, Vic Gothefred, fra quhome they were called at that time Clan Gothofred, that is, Clan Gotheray in Hybers Leid, and they were very grate men in that tymes zeire.

    There is agreement that his father was "Gillibrigdi" (variously spelled) and that his grandfather was Gilli Adamnáin. Solam and its variants consistently appears as his great-grandfather, but earlier than this there can be little certainty. These sources generally lead back to the legendary figure of Colla Uais.

    The name "Gofraid" also appears in all the different versions, and in addition to Monro's claim that Somerled was a member of "Clan Gothofred " in a poetic address to Aonghus of Islay, Clann Somairle is described as having "sprung from Síol nGofraidh" (the seed of Gofraid). Woolf (2005) identifies this as referring to Godred Crovan rather than Gofraid ua Ímair or Gofraid mac Fergusa as has been claimed, although as Crovan died in 1095 this would require far fewer intermediate names than the annals suggest.

    Life

    Somerled first appears in historical chronicles in the year 1140 as the Regulus, or King, of Kintyre (Cinn Tìre) when he marries Raghnailt the daughter of Olaf (or Amhlaibh), King of Mann and the Isles. The year 1153 saw the deaths of two kings: David I of Scotland and Olaf of Mann. There was much confusion and discord as a result and Somerled took his chance, making offensive moves against both Scotland and Mann and the Isles, the latter having been inherited from Olaf by Somerled's brother-in-law, Goraidh mac Amhlaibh.

    A summoning was sent, from Thorfin the most powerful jarl of the Hebrides, to Somerled Dougal—Somerled's own son by his wife, the daughter of the Manx king—to move so he might be "King over the Isles". In 1156 Goraidh was defeated during the Battle of Epiphany against 80 ships of Somerled's fleet and the two enemies partitioned the isles between them. Goraidh kept the islands north of Ardnamurchan with Somerled gaining the rest. However, two years after this Somerled returned to the Isle of Man with 53 warships. He defeated Goraidh again in battle and this time forced him to flee to Norway. Somerled's kingdom now stretched from the Isle of Man to the Butt of Lewis.

    Thus both Viking and Scot formed one people under a single lord, coming to share a single culture and one way of life — they were to become a powerful and noted race known as the Gall-Gaidheal, literally meaning 'Foreign-Gaels'. It was upon the seas that their power was situated under the rule of the Kings of the Isles; yet new enemies arose in the east.

    Invasion and death

    The Stewarts made inroads in the west coast and eventually Somerled assembled a sizable army to repel them. He landed an invasion fleet on the shore of the Clyde near Inchinnan and advanced towards Renfrew and the centre of the Stewarts' territory, where the Battle of Renfrew was fought in 1164. Much confusion surrounds the manner of the battle, and indeed whether a battle occurred at all, but what is certain is that Somerled was killed, either assassinated in his tent as he camped or from a spear wound suffered in an early phase of the battle. The leaderless fleet then retreated from the area.

    Legacy

    Following the death of Somerled several powerful lords emerged from within his kingdom. The lordship was contested by two main families; that of Somerled and his descendants and that of the descendants of Goraidh mac Amhlaibh. During the 12th and 13th centuries the Scandinavian world saw much change in methods of rule and administration which ultimately resulted in more strongly centralized, unified kingdoms such as Denmark and Norway. However, this did not happen in the Kingdom of the Isles, which was instead absorbed into the greater Kingdom of Scotland, albeit its place in that state and the loyalty of its inhabitants to the King of Scots would remain peripheral and temperamental for centuries to come.

    A 2005 study by Oxford Geneticist Bryan Sykes suggested Somerled may have 500,000 living descendants -- second only to Genghis Khan: "Roughly a quarter of Macdonalds, a third of McDougalls, and 40 percent of Macalisters are direct paternal descendents of Somerled ... it has been estimated that there are there are 200,000 men who carry Somerled's Y-chromosome as proof of their descent from the man who drove the Norse from the Isles". Sykes suggested Somerled was a member of the Y-DNA R1a1 Haplogroup, a tentative marker of Viking descent among men of deep British or Scottish ancestry.6,7

Family 2: Ragnhilde Olafsdotter b. c 1120

  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2016

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  4. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, page 7, 12.
  5. [S711] Donald Gregory, History of the Western Highlands & Isles of Scotland from A.D. 1493 to A.D. 1625, pages 15, 16.
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2457.htm#i24565
  7. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somerled
  8. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p14697.htm#i146969
  9. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p49366.htm#i493658

Donald Campbell

M, #2588, b. circa 1860, d. before 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Catherine MacInnis b. c 1860, d. b 1960

  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  2. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Michael Alex Campbell, page 277.
  3. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of James Allan Campbell, page 277.
  4. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Margaret Ann Campbell, page 278.
  5. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Donald Neil Campbell, page 279.
  6. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Mary Flora Campbell, page 279.
  7. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of John Murdock Campbell, page 280.
  8. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  9. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Margaret Ann Campbell, page 277.
  10. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Death Registration of Margaret N. MacFarlane
    Year 1959
    Page 6320.
  11. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Mardaret Campbell & John Charles Gillisl
    Registration Year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 426.
  12. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of John Lauchie Campbell, page 278.

Catherine MacInnis

F, #2589, b. circa 1860, d. before 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Donald Campbell b. c 1860, d. b 1960

  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2014

Citations

  1. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  2. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Michael Alex Campbell, page 277.
  3. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of James Allan Campbell, page 277.
  4. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Margaret Ann Campbell, page 278.
  5. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Donald Neil Campbell, page 279.
  6. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Mary Flora Campbell, page 279.
  7. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of John Murdock Campbell, page 280.
  8. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  9. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Margaret Ann Campbell, page 277.
  10. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Death Registration of Margaret N. MacFarlane
    Year 1959
    Page 6320.
  11. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Mardaret Campbell & John Charles Gillisl
    Registration Year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 426.
  12. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of John Lauchie Campbell, page 278.

Mary Flora Campbell1

F, #2590, b. 20 November 1886, d. after 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: William Burgess b. c 1890

  • Last Edited: 2 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Mary Flora Campbell, page 279.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.

Donald Neil Campbell1

M, #2591, b. 8 October 1893, d. after 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 2 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Donald Neil Campbell, page 279.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.

Michael Alexander Campbell1

M, #2592, b. 17 October 1903, d. after 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 9 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of Michael Alex Campbell, page 277.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  4. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Birth Registration of Alexander Michael Campbell
    Registration year 1904
    Page 68000390.

John Murdock Allan Campbell1

M, #2593, b. 3 December 1900, d. after 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 2 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of John Murdock Campbell, page 280.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.

James Allan Campbell1

M, #2594, b. 6 December 1896, d. after 1960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 2 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S709] Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada , Baptismal record of James Allan Campbell, page 277.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.

William Burgess

M, #2595, b. circa 1890

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Mary Flora Campbell b. 20 Nov 1886, d. a 1960

  • Last Edited: 20 Mar 2014

Citations

  1. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.

John Charles Gillis1

M, #2596, b. 7 March 1891, d. before 1920

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Margaret Ann Campbell b. 8 Dec 1888, d. 26 Oct 1959

  • Last Edited: 8 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records.
  2. [S255] 1891 Federal Canadian Census, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.
  3. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Mardaret Campbell & John Charles Gillisl
    Registration Year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 426.
  4. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records, page 26, line 2.
  5. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  6. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage registration for Mardaret Campbell & John Charles Gillisl
    Registration Year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 7426.
  7. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mary K. Gillis, September 27, 1945.

Mary Catherine MacFarlane1

F, #2598, b. 11 July 1925, d. 27 January 2002

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Nationalty*: Her nationality was Canadian.
  • Birth*: Mary was born on 11 July 1925 in SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.3,2
  • Married Name: As of circa 1943,her married name was Gillis.2
  • Death*: She died on 27 January 2002 in Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada, at age 76.4
  • Obituary: Her obituary reads:

    Tuesday, January 29, 2002 The Halifax Herald Limited, GILLIS, Mary Catherine - 76, South
    West Margaree, passed away peacefully Sunday, January 27, 2002, in Inverness Consolidated
    Memorial Hospital. She was a loving wife, a caring and giving mother and an inspiration to
    all her grandchildren. She was devoted in her faith and was a member of St. Joseph's Parish,
    South West Margaree. Catherine leaves behind her husband, Patrick; children, Ethna (Brooks
    Hart), Darlene (Sean Murphy), Alan (Maureen Gillis), all of Margaree; Sandy (Brenda Gillis),
    Inverness; Tena (John Blondin), Kim (Brian Mosher), Paula (Tony VanBommel), Halifax;
    Theresa (Dave Blaney), Jimmy (Mary Gillis), Dartmouth; Anne Myles, London, Ont; Fabian
    (Carol Gillis), Danny (Elaine Murphy), Fort McMurray, Alta; she also leaves behind 19
    grandchildren who loved her dearly. She was predeceased by her sons, Patrick Francis, John
    Charles "Chuck"; brothers, Joe, Frank, Malcolm, Charles, D.D. Anyone who knew Catherine
    would agree that she kept her door open to family and friends and there was always an
    abundance of talk, tea and laughter around the kitchen table. Visitation will be 2-4, 7-9 p.m.
    Wednesday in Inverness Funeral Home, Inverness. A funeral mass will be held Thursday,
    January 31, in St. Joseph's Parish, South West Margaree, Rev. Peter MacLeod officiating. In
    lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia or a
    charity of choice.4
  • Burial*: She was buried after 29 January 2002 in SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.4
  • Biography*: Mary Catherine was married and living in SW Margaree at the time of her mother's death in 1960.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 11 Aug 2016

Citations

  1. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  3. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records, page 66, line 27.
  4. [S762] Allan J. Gillis, Descendants of Donald Campbell ID# 2588, page 2.
  5. [S429] Obituaries from The Halifax Chronicle Herald Newspaper, Obituary of James Gerard Gillis, November 2014.

John Charles MacFarlane

M, #2599, b. 14 July 1924, d. before 1946

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S211] Interview, Rose Jessie MacFarlane, 1993.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  3. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records, page 66, line 10.

Alexander Joseph MacFarlane1

M, #2602, b. 25 May 1930, d. 28 March 1996

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family:

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of Mrs. John A. MacFarlane, 101-1960-32-2.
  3. [S506] Robert Joseph Gillis, Two Gillis Families, page 237.
  4. [S762] Allan J. Gillis, Descendants of Donald Campbell ID# 2588, page 4.

Hugh MacFarlane

M, #2604, b. circa 1940, d. circa 1959

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S2] Letter, Edmund Burns to Gerald MacFarlane, December 1, 1991.
  2. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of George Bernard MacFarlane, 109-1961-22-6.
  3. [S429] Obituaries from The Halifax Chronicle Herald Newspaper, Obituary of Helen Florence Sperry.

Margaret R. MacFarlane1

F, #2605, b. 2 March 1948, d. 14 October 1955

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S489] Donald James MacFarlane, St. Joseph's Church Cemetery, S. W. Margaree, Row , plot.
  2. [S2] Letter, Edmund Burns to Gerald MacFarlane, December 1, 1991.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of George Bernard MacFarlane, 109-1961-22-6.
  4. [S432] Obituaries from The Cape Breton Post Newspaper, Obituary of John Joseph MacFarlane, August 16, 2008.
  5. [S429] Obituaries from The Halifax Chronicle Herald Newspaper, Obituary of Helen Florence Sperry.
  6. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.

Rev. Ronald Joseph MacFarlane S.F.M.1,2

M, #2606, b. 6 October 1936, d. 11 February 2013

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Nationalty*: His nationality was Canadian.
  • Birth*: Ronald was born on 6 October 1936 in SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.4,3,5,2
  • Ordination*: He was ordained on 20 August 1961; S. F. M.4,6,5
  • Residence: He lived on 20 March 1993 in Toronto, York, Ontario, Canada.7
  • Residence*: He lived on 16 August 2008 in Toronto, York, Ontario, Canada.6
  • Death*: He died on 11 February 2013 in Scarborough, York, Ontario, Canada, at age 76.2
  • Obituary: His obituary reads:

    A true Cape Bretoner, died on Monday, February 11, 2013. He was born on October 6, 1936, in Inverness, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and grew up in Southwest Margaree. He was ordained a missionary priest on August 20, 1961, in Antigonish, NS. Father Ron served as a priest in the Dominican Republic, in the Canadian Armed Forces and in the Bahamas.He is predeceased by his parents, John Joseph and Ruth (Carroll), as well as siblings Margaret, Hugh, George, Helen, Mary Rose and John. He issurvived by siblings Anne (Smith), Peter, Donald and Gerard and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Visitation will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13th, at Scarboro Missions, 2685 Kingston Road, Scarborough, ON M1M 1M4 (SW corner of Kingston Road and Brimley). The Funeral Mass will be held on Thursday, February 14th, at 10 a.m. at Scarboro Missions. Burial will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations for the work of Scarboro Missions would be appreciated.2
  • Biography*: He was ordained to the priesthood in August, 1961, S.F.M.4
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  2. [S723] Obituaries - The Toronto Star, Obituary of Rev. Ronald Joseph MacFarlane, SFM
    February 12, 2013.
  3. [S2] Letter, Edmund Burns to Gerald MacFarlane, December 1, 1991.
  4. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of George Bernard MacFarlane, 109-1961-22-6.
  5. [S768] Allan J. Gillis, Descendants of John Joseph MacFarlane, page 1.
  6. [S432] Obituaries from The Cape Breton Post Newspaper, Obituary of John Joseph MacFarlane, August 16, 2008.
  7. [S429] Obituaries from The Halifax Chronicle Herald Newspaper, Obituary of Helen Florence Sperry.

John Joseph MacFarlane1

M, #2608, b. circa 1945, d. 16 August 2008

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: John was born circa 1945 in SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.4,2,1
  • Residence*: He lived on 20 March 1993 in SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.5
  • Death: He died on 14 August 2008 in Inverary Manor, Inverness, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada; John Joseph MacFarlane 63, Southwest Margaree - John Joseph MacFarlane, 63, of Southwest Margaree, passed away Thursday, August 14, 2008 at the Inverary Manor, Inverness. Born in Inverness, he was the son of the late John Joseph and Ruth Eleanor (Carroll) MacFarlane. He was a member of St. Joseph's Parish, Southwest Margaree. John will be sadly missed by his many friends, nieces and nephews.
    He is survived by brothers, Fr. Ronald MacFarlane S.F.M (Toronto), Donald MacFarlane (Monika), Montreal, Peter (Betty) MacFarlane, Southwest Margaree, Gerard (Donna) MacFarlane, Southwest Margaree; sisters, Ann Smith, Long Point, and Mary Rose Detcher, Dartmouth. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by brothers, Hugh S. and George, and sisters, Helen Sperry and Margaret MacFarlane.
    Visitation for the late Mr. MacFarlane will take place on Sunday, August 17, from 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. at Inverness Funeral Home. A funeral mass will be celebrated on Monday, August 18 at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph Church, Southwest Margaree with Rev. Jim MacDonald officiating. Interment in St. Joseph Parish Cemetery.1
  • Obituary*: His obituary reads:

    John Joseph MacFarlane 63, Southwest Margaree - John Joseph MacFarlane, 63, of Southwest Margaree, passed away Thursday, August 14, 2008 at the Inverary Manor, Inverness. Born in Inverness, he was the son of the late John Joseph and Ruth Eleanor (Carroll) MacFarlane. He was a member of St.
    Joseph's Parish, Southwest Margaree. John will be sadly missed by his many friends, nieces and nephews.
    He is survived by brothers, Fr. Ronald MacFarlane S.F.M (Toronto), Donald MacFarlane (Monika), Montreal, Peter (Betty) MacFarlane, Southwest Margaree, Gerard (Donna) MacFarlane, Southwest Margaree; sisters, Ann Smith, Long Point, and Mary Rose Detcher, Dartmouth. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by brothers, Hugh S. and George, and sisters, Helen Sperry and Margaret MacFarlane.
    Visitation for the late Mr. MacFarlane will take place on Sunday, August 17, from 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. at Inverness Funeral Home. A funeral mass will be celebrated on Monday, August 18 at 11 a.m. at St. Joseph Church, Southwest Margaree with Rev. Jim MacDonald officiating. Interment in St. Joseph Parish Cemetery.
    Memorial donations may be made to the Inverary Manor, Inverness.1
  • Burial*: He was buried on 18 August 2008 in St Joseph's Cemetery, SW Margaree, Inverness, Nova Scotia, Canada.1
  • Biography*: John was living at home at the time of his brother George's death in November, 1961.4
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S432] Obituaries from The Cape Breton Post Newspaper, Obituary of John Joseph MacFarlane, August 16, 2008.
  2. [S2] Letter, Edmund Burns to Gerald MacFarlane, December 1, 1991.
  3. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present.
  4. [S100] Obituaries from The Casket Newspaper, 1852 - present, Obituary of George Bernard MacFarlane, 109-1961-22-6.
  5. [S429] Obituaries from The Halifax Chronicle Herald Newspaper, Obituary of Helen Florence Sperry.