Sir John Savage KG1

M, #9961, b. circa 1425, d. October 1492

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Sir John Savage KG was born circa 1425 in Cheshire, England.1
  • Death*: He died in October 1492 in Killed at seige of Boulogne, France.1
  • Biography*: John Savage, KG (–1492), was a major Cheshire landowner and supporter successively of Edward IV and Henry VII.

    Background
    The Savages had been established in Cheshire since his great-great-grandfather John Savage (–1386) married Margaret Danyers, heiress of Clifton and other lands around what became called Rocksavage. His mother was Katherine Stanley, sister of Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby, and his father John Savage (c. 1424–1495).

    Career
    Savage fought with the Yorkists at the Battle of Tewkesbury and became close to Edward IV, whom he served as royal carver and knight of the body. Edward appointed him constable of Hanley Castle, and he was a pallbearer at the king's funeral. Under Richard III, Savage and his father fell under suspicion but remained at liberty, John being made a freeman of Chester in 1484, when his father was mayor of the city.

    Support for Henry Tudor
    According to Polydore Vergil, Savage was one of the prominent men who "invited" Henry Tudor to invade. His brother, Thomas Savage, later Archbishop of York, may have been then living abroad and acting as the English Savages' direct link to the future Henry VII. When Henry landed, Savage at once declared for him, and raised a considerable body of troops to fight at the Battle of Bosworth, wearing the Savage family's distinctive livery of white hoods, as described in the poem Bosworth Feilde:
    Sir John Savage, that hardy Knight,
    deathes dentes he delt that day
    with many a white hood in fight,
    that sad men were at assay.

    After the battle, in which he commanded the left wing, he received extensive grants of land confiscated from Richard's supporters, including from John, Lord Zouche, and Francis, Lord Lovell. On 16 November 1488 he was appointed a Knight of the Garter. He was killed at the siege of Boulogne in October 1492.

    Family
    Savage married Dorothy, daughter of Sir Ralph Vernon of Haddon Hall. They had a son, John (–1527), ancestor of John Savage, 2nd Earl Rivers, and of subsequent Savage Earl Rivers, and four daughters.1
  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Robert Savage Lord of Ardes1

M, #9962, b. circa 1425

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Robert Savage Lord of Ardes was born circa 1425 in Ardes, Ireland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cathanach_MacDonald,_4th_of_Dunnyveg.

Sir John Wemyss of Leuchars1

M, #9963, b. circa 1340, d. 1428

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Isabel Erskine b. c 1360

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50032.htm#i500318
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p51877.htm#i518761

Isabel Erskine1

F, #9964, b. circa 1360

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir John Wemyss of Leuchars b. c 1340, d. 1428

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p51877.htm#i518761
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50005.htm#i500046

Sir John Scrymgeour1

M, #9966, b. circa 1400, d. 1465

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Marion Abernathy b. c 1400

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p1336.htm#i13360
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256233
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256235
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256237

Marion Abernathy1

F, #9967, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir John Scrymgeour b. c 1400, d. 1465

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256237

Sir James Scrymgeour of Dudhope1

M, #9968, b. circa 1375, d. 24 July 1411

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Egidia Maxwell b. c 1375

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256233
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256235

Egidia Maxwell1

F, #9969, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir James Scrymgeour of Dudhope b. c 1375, d. 24 Jul 1411

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p25624.htm#i256235
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2167.htm#i21662

Elizabeth de Lindsey1

F, #9970, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir John Maxwell of Pollok b. c 1330

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2167.htm#i21662

Sir Alan Erskine of Inchmartin1

M, #9971, b. circa 1340, d. May 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Isabel Inchmartin b. c 1340

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50005.htm#i500046

Isabel Inchmartin1

F, #9972, b. circa 1340

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir Alan Erskine of Inchmartin b. c 1340, d. May 1400

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50005.htm#i500046

John Inchmartin of that Ilk1

M, #9973, b. circa 1325

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Margaret Wemyss b. c 1325

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50005.htm#i500046

Margaret Wemyss1

F, #9974, b. circa 1325

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: John Inchmartin of that Ilk b. c 1325

  • Last Edited: 8 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50005.htm#i500046

Amlaib Cuarán1

M, #9975, b. circa 927, d. 981

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Amlaib Cuarán was born circa 927 in Ireland*.1
  • Death*: He died in 981 in monastery on Iona, Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Amlaíb mac Sitric (c. 927 – 981; Old Norse: Óláfr Sigtryggsson), commonly called Amlaíb Cuarán, in Old Norse: Óláfr kváran, was a 10th-century Norse-Gael who was King of Northumbria and Dublin. His byname, cuarán, is usually translated as "sandal". His name appears in a variety of anglicized forms, including Olaf Cuaran and Olaf Sihtricson, particularly in relation to his short-lived rule in York. He was the last of the Uí Ímair to play a major part in the politics of the British Isles.

    Amlaíb was twice, perhaps three times, ruler of Northumbria and twice ruler of Dublin and its dependencies. His reign over these territories spanned some forty years. He was a renowned warrior and a ruthless pillager of churches, but ended his days in retirement at Iona Abbey. Born when the Uí Ímair ruled over large areas of the British Isles, by his death the kingdom of Dublin was a minor power in Irish politics. At the same time, Dublin became a major centre of trade in Atlantic Europe and mastery over the city and its wealth became the supreme prize for ambitious Irish kings.

    In death Amlaíb was the prototype for the Middle English romance character Havelok the Dane. In life he was a patron of Irish poets and Scandinavian skalds who wrote verses praising their paymaster. Amlaíb was married at least twice, and had many children who married into Irish and Scandinavian royal families. His descendants were kings in the Isle of Man and the Hebrides until the 13th century.

    Background
    The earliest records of attacks by Vikings in Britain or Ireland are at the end of the eighth century. The monastery on Lindisfarne, in the kingdom of Northumbria, was sacked on 8 June 793, and the monastery of Iona in the kingdom of the Picts was attacked in 795 and 802. In Ireland Rathlin Island, off the north-east coast, was the target in 795, and so too was St Patrick's Island on the east coast in 798. Portland in the kingdom of Wessex in south-west Britain was attacked during the reign of King Beorhtric of Wessex (ruled from 786 to 802).

    These raids continued in a sporadic fashion throughout the first quarter of the ninth century. During the second quarter of the century the frequency and size of raids increased and the first permanent Viking settlements (called longphorts in Ireland) appeared.

    Origins
    The Ímar from whom the Uí Ímair were descended is generally presumed to be that Ímar (English pronunciation Ivar): "king of the Northmen of all Britain and Ireland", whose death is reported by the Annals of Ulster in 873. Whether this Ímar is to be identified with Ivar the Boneless, the leader of the Great Heathen Army, is rather less certain, although at the same time not unlikely.

    Amlaíb Cuarán was probably a great-grandson of Ímar. There is no contemporary evidence setting out the descent from Ímar to his grandsons, but it may be that the grandsons of Ímar recorded between 896 and 934—Amlaíb Cuarán's father Sitriuc (d. 927), Ragnall (d. 921), Gofraid (d. 934), Ímar (d. 904) and Amlaíb (d. 896)—were brothers rather than cousins. Amlaíb's father Sitriuc first appears in the record in 917 when he seized Dublin, a settlement which had probably been under the control of an Irish king since the expulsion of the previous Viking rulers in 902.

    Sitriuc ruled Northumbria until his death in 927. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records his marriage to King Æthelstan's sister at Tamworth on 30 January 926. According to some late sources, such as the chronicler John of Wallingford, Amlaíb was the son of Sitriuc and this West Saxon princess. Sitriuc's other sons included Gofraid (died 951), king of Dublin, Aralt (died 940), ruler of Limerick, and, less certainly, Sichfrith and Auisle, listed among those killed at the battle of Brunanburh in 937 by the Annals of Clonmacnoise. A daughter of Sitriuc named Gytha is said in the Heimskringla to have married Norwegian pirate king Olaf Tryggvason, but she was probably a daughter of Amlaíb Cuarán.

    Following Sitriuc's death, Amlaíb may have become king in York for a short time, but if he did it came to an end when Æthelstan took over the kingdom of Northumbria and defeated Sitriuc's brother Gofraid. According to William of Malmesbury, Amlaíb fled to Ireland while his uncle Gofraid made a second unsuccessful attempt to gain control of York. In 937 an attack on Æthelstan's kingdom by Gofraid's son Amlaíb, assisted by Constantín mac Áeda, the king of Alba, and Owen, the king of Strathclyde, ended in defeat at the battle of Brunanburh. William of Malmesbury wrote that Amlaíb was present at Brunanburh and spied out the English camp the night before the battle disguised as a skald.

    King Æthelstan died in 939 and his successor, his half-brother Edmund, was unable to keep control of York. Amlaíb mac Gofrith, ruling in Dublin, crossed to Britain where he was accepted as king of the Northumbrians. He died in 941, shortly after sacking the church of Saint Baldred at Tyninghame, struck dead by the saint's power according to the Historia de Sancto Cuthberto. This traditional view of Amlaíb mac Gofrith's later career has recently been disputed by Kevin Halloran. The basic argument presented is that Amlaíb mac Gofrith did not rule in York and the suggestion that only one Amlaíb, Amlaíb Cuarán, was king there may explain some of the apparent anomalies in the numismatic record.

    York
    Amlaíb Cuarán's career began in 941, following the death of his cousin Amlaíb mac Gofrith, when he became co-ruler of York, sharing power with his cousin Ragnall son of Gofraid. According to the Annals of Clonmacnoise, Amlaíb had been in Britain since 940, having left another son of Gofraid, Blácaire, as ruler of Dublin.

    Amlaíb and Ragnall ruled in York until 944. The dating of events in period between the death of Æthelstan and the expulsion of Amlaíb and Ragnall is uncertain as the various versions of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle are in conflict. It appears that after Æthelstan's death, not only did Edmund lose control of Northumbria, but that the Five Burghs of the Mercian Danelaw also pledged themselves to Amlaíb mac Gofrith. One of the Amlaíbs stormed Tamworth according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle:
    Here Olaf broke down Tamworth and a great slaughter fell on either side, and the Danes had the victory and led much war-booty away with them. Wulfrun was seized in the raid. Here King Edmund besieged King Olaf and Archbishop Wulfstan in Leicester, and he might have controlled them had they not escaped from the stronghold in the night.

    It is not clear when in the period between 940 and 943 these events took place, and as a result historians disagree as to whether they concern Amlaíb mac Gofrith or Amlaíb Cuarán.


    Edmund reconquered the Five Burghs in 942, an event celebrated in verse by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. The Chronicle reports the baptism of Amlaíb, with King Edmund becoming his godfather. This need not mean that Amlaíb was not already a Christian, nor would such a baptism have permanently committed him to Christianity, as such baptisms were often political acts. Alfred the Great, for example, had sponsored the confirmation of Christian Welsh king Anarawd ap Rhodri. Amlaíb was expelled from the kingship of York in 944. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle reports that "King Edmund conquered all Northumbria and caused to flee away two kings [or "royally-born men"], Olaf and Rægnald". It is possible that rivalry between Amlaíb and Ragnall contributed to their fall. Æthelweard's history reports that Amlaíb was deposed by a coup led by Wulfstan, Archbishop of York, and an unnamed Mercian ealdorman.

    Congalach and Ruaidrí
    After being driven out of Northumbria, Amlaíb returned to Ireland while Ragnall may have been killed at York. The Uí Ímair in Ireland had also suffered in 944 as Dublin was sacked that year by the High King of Ireland Congalach Cnogba, whose power base lay in Brega, north of Dublin on the lower reaches of the River Boyne. The following year, perhaps as a result of the sack of Dublin, Amlaíb's cousin Blácaire was driven out and Amlaíb replaced him as ruler of Dublin. Amlaíb was allied with Congalach and may have gained power with his assistance.

    Congalach and Amlaíb fought against Ruaidrí ua Canannáin, a rival for the High Kingship who belonged to the Cenél Conaill, based in modern County Donegal. In 945 the two defeated part of Ruaidrí's army in Conaille Muirtheimne (modern County Louth) and the following year Amlaíb raided Kilcullen in the province of Leinster. In 947 Ruaidrí routed Congalach and Amlaíb at Slane. Losses among the Dublin men were heavy, with many drowning while fleeing the battle. This defeat appears to have lost Amlaíb his kingship, as the annals record that Blácaire not Amlaíb was the leader of the Dublin forces in the following year. Blácaire was killed in 948 by Congalach, and was succeeded by Amlaíb's brother Gofraid.

    York again
    The course of events in Northumbria while Amlaíb was in Ireland is uncertain. While Edmund certainly controlled Northumbria after Amlaíb was expelled and Ragnall killed, he may soon after have lost control of the north to a Scandinavian king named Eiríkr, usually identified with Eric Bloodaxe. If Erik did rule in Northumbria before Edmund's death, it was only for a short time. Edmund was killed in 946, and succeeded by his brother Eadred. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that Eadred "reduced all the land of Northumbria to his control; and the Scots granted him oaths that they would do all that he wanted". The Northumbrian submission to Eadred led to a meeting with the notables of York led by Archbishop Wulfstan in 947, but the following year King Erik was back ruling Northumbria and Eadred laid waste to the southern parts of the kingdom— Ripon is mentioned as a particular target—to force the Northumbrians to expel Erik, which they did.

    The following year, 949, by which time Blacáire was dead and Amlaíb's brother ruling in Dublin, the Northumbrians invited Amlaíb to rule in York. His return to England may have been with Eadred's agreement. That year Máel Coluim mac Domnaill, the king of Alba, raided Northumbria as far south as the River Tees, capturing many slaves and much loot. Whether this invasion was directed against Amlaíb, or perhaps intended to support him by plundering only northern Northumbria which may have been outwith his control, is uncertain. A second invasion from the north in 952, this time an alliance including Máel Coluim's Scots and also Britons and Saxons, was defeated. Again, whether this was aimed against Amlaíb, who was deposed in 952 and replaced by Erik, or was mounted against King Erik in support of Amlaíb, is unclear. Erik's reign was short and the Viking kingdom of York was definitively incorporated into the kingdom of the English on his death in 954. Amlaíb returned to Ireland, never again to rule in York.

    From Dublin to Iona
    In 951, while Amlaíb was in Britain his brother Gofraid died in Dublin of disease. Congalach's rival Ruaidrí was also dead, leaving Amlaíb's former ally as undisputed High King and thus a serious threat to Dublin and the south-eastern Irish kingdom of Leinster. This threat was perhaps what led to Congalach's death in an ambush at Dún Ailinne (modern County Kildare) or at Tech Guigenn in the region of the River Liffey while collecting tribute in Leinster in 956. The main beneficiary was the brother of Amlaíb's new wife Dúnflaith, Domnall ua Néill, who became the next High King of Ireland. The marriage linked Amlaíb not only to the northern Uí Néill kindred of Cenél nEógain, but also to the southern Clann Cholmáin as he was now stepfather to Dúnflaith's young son Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill.

    In the early 960s Amlaíb Cuarán probably faced a challenge from the sons of his cousin Amlaíb mac Gofrith. In 960 the Annals of Ulster report that Cammán, son of Amlaíb mac Gofrith, was defeated at an unidentifiable place named Dub. Two years later one Sitriuc Cam—Cam means crooked or twisted and Cammán is simply the hypocoristic form of this byname, so that Sitriuc Cam and Cammán are presumed to be the same person—was defeated by the Dubliners led by Amlaíb Cuarán and the Leinstermen while raiding in Leinster. Amlaíb Cuarán was wounded in the battle but Sitriuc fled to his ships. Sitriuc and his brothers appear to have raided Munster after this, but disappear from the record soon afterwards and do not appear to have returned to Ireland.

    Amlaíb's activities in the early 960s seem largely to have been limited to occasional raids in Leinster. He attacked Kildare in 964, and it was a target again in 967 when Muiredach mac Faeláin, abbot of Kildare, a member of Uí Dúnlainge kindred which ruled Leinster, was killed by Amlaíb and Cerball mac Lorcáin, a kinsman of Muiredach's. Another raid south in 964 ended in a heavy defeat for Amlaíb near Inistogue (modern County Kildare) at the hands of the Osraige.

    Until the late 960s Domnall ua Néill, Congalach's successor as would-be High King, was occupied with enemies close to home, and in Connacht and Munster, and did not intervene in Leinster or the hinterlands of Dublin. Having defeated these, in 968 he marched south and plundered Leinster, killing several notables, and laid siege to Dublin for two months. While Domnall did not take the port, he carried off a great many cattle. Amlaíb, allied with the king of Leinster Murchad mac Finn, retaliated by attacking the abbey of Kells in 969. A pursuit by ua Néill's allies was defeated near Ardmulchan (County Meath).

    In 970 Domnall ua Néill and his allies attacked Amlaíb's new-found ally, Congalach's son Domnall, the king of Brega. Domnall mac Congalaig was married to a daughter of Amlaíb, perhaps at about this time. Churches in Brega, including Monasterboice and Dunleer, guarded by Amlaíb's soldiers, were a particular target of the raids. Domnall of Brega and Amlaíb fought against Domnall ua Néill's northern army at Kilmona in modern County Westmeath. Domnall's army, which included allies from Ulaid was defeated, and Ardgal mac Matudáin, king of Ulaid, and Cináed mac Crongilla, king of Conaille Muirtheimne, were among those killed. The battle at Kilmona did not end the war in the midlands. Monasterboice and Dunleer were burned after the battle and fighting spread to the lands of Clann Cholmáin the following year when Domnall ua Néill's enemies there drove him out, only for him to return with an army and ravage both Mide and the lands around Dublin before marching south to attack Leinster. This campaign appears to have established Domnall ua Néill as effective overlord of the midlands and Leinster for some years.

    In 977, in unknown circumstances, Domnall ua Néill's sons Congalach and Muirchertach were killed and Amlaíb is given credit for their deaths by the annals. Domnall made no effort to avenge the deaths, retiring to the monastery at Armagh where he died in 980. The Dubliners campaigned against Leinster the late 970s. The overking of Leinster, Úgaire mac Túathail, was captured in 976. He was evidently ransomed or released as he was killed, along with Muiredach mac Riain of Uí Cheinnselaig of south Leinster, fighting against the Dubliners in 978 at Belan (County Kildare). Úgaire's successor Domnall Claen was little more fortunate, being captured by the Dubliners the following year.

    Following the death of High King Domnall ua Néill, Amlaíb's stepson Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill claimed the title. Amlaíb's former ally Domnall son of Congalach had died in 976, removing one potential rival, and as Amlaíb had killed two of Domnall ua Néill's sons he may have cleared the way for Máel Sechnaill to take power. If so, it was unlikely to be by design. Máel Sechnaill had become king of Mide and head of Clann Cholmáin in 975 and had inaugurated his reign with an attack on his stepfather when he burned "Thor's Wood" outside Dublin. In 980 Máel Sechnaill had the support of the Leinstermen when he faced Amlaíb's sons—Amlaíb himself was by now an old man—near the hill of Tara. The Dubliners too had allies as the Irish annals record the presence of warriors from the Isle of Man or the Hebrides. Amlaíb's son Ragnall (Rögnvaldr) was among the dead in the battle which followed, and although several kings fighting alongside Máel Sechnaill were killed, the result was clearly a crushing blow for Dublin. Máel Sechnaill occupied the city and imposed a heavy tribute on the citizens.

    In the aftermath of this defeat Amlaíb abdicated, or was removed from power. He was replaced by a son named Glúniairn (Járnkné), a son of Dúnlaith and thus Máel Sechnaill's half-brother. Amlaíb retired to the monastery on Iona where he died soon afterwards.

    Marriages and children
    He was succeeded by his son Glúniairn (Járnkné, literally "Iron Knee"), son of his wife Dúnlaith, daughter of Muirchertach mac Néill. Among his wives was Gormflaith, daughter of Murchad mac Finn, King of Leinster, and future wife of Brian Boru. Gormflaith's son Sitric Silkbeard was king of Dublin after Glúniairn's death. Amlaíb's other children included Gytha, who married Olaf Tryggvason, Máel Muire, who married Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, and Harald, possibly the grandfather of Godred Crovan.

    Cuarán
    Amlaíb's byname, cuarán, is usually translated as "sandal" or "shoe". It derives from the Old Irish word cúar meaning bent or crooked. It is first applied to him in the report of the battle of Slane in 947 in the Annals of Ulster. The usual translation may be misleading. The epithet probably refers to a distinctive style of footwear. Benjamin Hudson points to the description of a cuarán in a twelfth-century satire, where it is made of leather folded seven times and has a pointed toe. In Aislinge Meic Con Glinne and Scél Baili Binnbérlaig, the cuarán is waterproof. In the first story Mac Con Glinne cleans his by dipping them in his bath; in the second, a cuarán serves as a vessel to drink from. That the cuarán was a piece of footwear specific to Dublin is suggested by statements in other stories that have cobblers in the town owing a cuarán in taxes.

    Icelandic sagas
    Amlaíb Cuarán (Olaf Kvaran) is referred to at least twice in the Icelandic sagas, once in Njal's Saga and again in Saga of Gunnlaugr Serpent-Tongue. It is from these references that Einar Hjorleifsson Kvaran and his siblings chose the name "Kvaran" as their own.1
  • Last Edited: 10 Sep 2017

John (?) Jarl of Orkney1

M, #9976, b. circa 1275, d. before 28 October 1312

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: John (?) Jarl of Orkney was born circa 1275 in Orkney, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married (?) Grahame, daughter of Sir David Grahame, circa 1300 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: John (?) Jarl of Orkney died before 28 October 1312.1
  • Biography*: Jón Magnússon was Earl of Orkney in 1284–c. 1312.

    Life
    Jón Magnússon was the son of Magnus III of Orkney, and succeeded his brother to the Earldom of Orkney and Earldom of Caithness in 1284. He was a signatory of the Treaty of Birgham/Salisbury in 1290, in which Margaret, Maid of Norway, was betrothed to Edward of Carnarfon. On 5 August 1296 he swore fealty to Edward I of England at Murkle, in Caithness.4

Family: (?) Grahame b. c 1275

  • Last Edited: 10 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19832.htm#i198312
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19832.htm#i198311
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50030.htm#i500294
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3n_Magn%C3%BAsson,_Earl_of_Orkney.

(?) Grahame1

F, #9977, b. circa 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: John (?) Jarl of Orkney b. c 1275, d. b 28 Oct 1312

  • Last Edited: 10 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50030.htm#i500294

Sir David Grahame1

M, #9978, b. circa 1250

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Sir David Grahame was born circa 1250 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 10 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50030.htm#i500294

Magnus III (?) Earl of Orkney1

M, #9979, b. circa 1250, d. circa 1284

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Name Variation: Magnus III (?) Earl of Orkney was also known as Malcolm (?) Jarl of Orkney.3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1250 in Orkney, Scotland.3
  • Death*: He died circa 1284 in Scotland.4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert,_Earl_of_Orkney.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p660.htm#i6591
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19832.htm#i198311
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…

unnamed daughter (?)1

F, #9981, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Gillbride (?) 2nd Earl of Angus b. c 1150, d. c 1187

  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p660.htm#i6591
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198306
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198304
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p660.htm#i6591
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p659.htm#i6589
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p659.htm#i6589

Erik Slagbrellir1

M, #9982, b. circa 1140

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Ingigerd (?) b. c 1140

  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198306
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198304

Ingigerd (?)1

F, #9983, b. circa 1140

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Erik Slagbrellir b. c 1140

  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198304
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198303

Rognvald Kolsson Jarl of Orkney1

M, #9984, b. circa 1103, d. 20 August 1158

St. Rögnvald

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Rognvald Kolsson Jarl of Orkney was born circa 1103 in Norway.1,3
  • Death*: He died on 20 August 1158 in Caithness, Scotland.1,3
  • Biography*: Rognvald Kale Kolsson (also known as St. Ronald or St. Ronald of Orkney) (c. 1103 - 1158) was an Earl of Orkney and a Norwegian saint.

    Life
    Rognvald's parents were lendmann Kol Kalisson and Gunnhild Erlendsdotter, the sister of Magnus Erlendsson. It was through his mother, Gunnhild that Rognvald had a claim on the Orkney earldom. Rognvald Kali Kolsson may have been born in Jæren, Norway. That is not most likely, since his family resided in Agder and Jæren is in Rogaland. Some researchers think that he may have been born in Fjære, a part of Grimstad. The kings estate at Lista is also estimated as birth- and childhood place. Rognvald's family owned several farms in Agder where the boy could have spent his childhood.

    Rognvald grew up in Norway where he was known as Kali Kolsson. He also had a sister, Ingirid. Kali was a fine poet and in one of his poem claims to possess nine exceptional skills; having mastered board games, runes, reading and writing, handicrafts such as metal work, carving and carpentry, skiing, archery, rowing, music and poetry. The sagas support this view of Kali as able and skilled: “Kali Kolsson was of average height, well proportioned and strong limbed, and had light chestnut hair. He was very popular and a man of more than average ability.”

    King Sigurd I of Norway appointed him Earl of Orkney and Shetland in 1129. When he became Earl, Kali was given the name Rognvald, after Earl Rognvald Brusason, who Rognvald's mother Gunnhild thought of as the most able of all the Earls of Orkney. It was thought this name would bring Rognvald luck. Rognvald should have had one half of Orkney as his uncle Magnus Erlendsson had, but his second cousin Paul Haakonsson had just made himself sole ruler of the islands and would not cede any of them.

    Rognvald remained in Norway as one of the leading men of King Harald Gille. His father counseled him to make a vow that if he were successful in establishing himself in Orkney, he would build a church in honour of his murdered uncle Magnus. By sabotating some beacons on Fair Isle and in the Orkneys, Rognvald made a successful landing unopposed. Through the intervention of the bishop an agreement was reached with Earl Paul. Later earl Paul Haakonsson was captured by Sweyn Asleifsson and delivered to the safe-keeping of Maddad, Earl of Athole, who was married to Paul's sister Margaret. What then happened to Earl Paul is unknown. Rognvald was hailed as jarl in 1136.

    In 1137, Rognvald initiated the building of St. Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Scotland. Rognvald also served as guardian to Harald Maddadsson, the five-year-old nephew of Paul Haakonsson. In 1138 Rognvald appointed Harald Maddadsson as Earl along with him. Harald had inherited Caithness, Scotland and thus was Rognvald master over this area.
    In 1151 Earl Rognvald set out on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. This celebrated enterprise takes up five complete chapters of Orkneyinga saga. The telling about their staying in the Holy Land is very short. It seems that the journey is the important part. But the description of the voyage is dominatet more by stories about fighting and feasting. The saga tells that the impulse for the pilgrimage came from a distant relative of Rognvald, Eindridi Ungi. There mentions prestige as a motivation for taking this big scale expedition. The earl, with Bishop William and other well-born companions, including Erling Skakki, left Orkney in the late summer of 1151 in fifteen ships. The fleet sailed through the Strait of Gibraltar, after which Eindridi Ungi went straight to Jerusalem with six ships while Rognvald tarried in Narbonne. During his stay there he composed several verses—included in the saga—in honour of the lovely lady Ermingard, verses which show strong influence from courtly love poetry, possibly the first such examples in skaldic verse.

    Having visited Jerusalem, the party made its way back north via Constantinople, where they were received by the emperor and his Varangian Guard, then sailed to Apulia where they took horses for the journey to Rome, arriving back in Orkney for Christmas 1153. This evidences the wide-ranging role of the earls of Orkney as players on the world scene of twelfth-century Europe. They were now participating in the cultural and religious activities of Christian Europe rather than threatening them from the periphery.

    While he was abroad, King David I of Scotland granted half of Caithness to the cousin of Harald Maddadsson, Erlend Haraldsson. Earl Harald subsequently displaced Erlend Haraldsson, who was killed in 1156. In August 1158, Rognvald was cut down with his company of eight men by Thorbjorn Klerk, the former friend and counselor of Harald, who had been made an outlaw by Earl Rognvald for a murder committed in Kirkwall, following a series of acts of violence. His body was taken to Kirkwall and buried in St. Magnus Cathedral. Alleged miracles shall have happened at his grave as well as on the stone where he died. Ragnvald was canonized 1192 by Pope Celestine III. But some doubts exist as to the validity of his sainthood, because no existing records seem to confirm it.

    Poet
    Rognvald was a skilled poet. The best known of his love poems is perhaps his exclamation of affection for Viscountess (or: Countess) Ermingerd of Narbonne. George Mackay Brown translates the poem as:
    Golden one, Tall one
    Moving in perfume and onyx
    Witty one, You with the shoulders
    Lapped in long silken hair/Listen: because of me
    The eagle has a red claw.

    Although the perfume and onyx are George Mackay Brown’s own invention, it is true to the spirit of the poem: Praising the lady in luxurious terms based on 12th century European aesthetics, while also bragging about himself using war-like Norse aesthetics.

    Another of his poems, translated by Ian Crockatt, reads:

    Vér h?fum vaðnar leirur
    vikur fimm megingrimmar;
    saurs vasa vant, es vârum,
    viðr, í Grímsbœ miðjum.
    Nús, þats mâs of mýrar
    meginkátliga lâtum
    branda elg á bylgjur
    Bj?rgynjar til dynja.

    Muck, slime, mud. We waded
    for five mired weeks, reeking,
    silt-fouled bilge-boards souring
    in Grimsby bay. Nimbly
    now, our proud-prowed Bergen-
    bound Sea-Elk pounds over
    wave-paved auk-moors – locks horns
    with foam-crests, bows booming.

    Other verses, record events which occurred during the rest of the journey, such as Rognvald's swim across the River Jordan.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 10 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198303
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198301
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%B6gnvald_Kali_Kolsson

Kol Kalison1

M, #9985, b. circa 1075

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Gunhild (?) b. c 1075

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198303
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198301

Gunhild (?)1

F, #9986, b. circa 1075

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Kol Kalison b. c 1075

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p19831.htm#i198301
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10772.htm#i107711

Erlend Thorfinnsson Jarl of Orkney1,2

M, #9987, b. circa 1040, d. after 1098

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Erlend Thorfinnsson Jarl of Orkney was born circa 1040 in Norway.1
  • Death*: He died after 1098 in Norway.1
  • Biography*: Paul Thorfinnsson (died after 1098) and Erlend Thorfinnsson (died after 1098) were brothers who ruled together as Earls of Orkney.

    Biography
    Paul and Erlend Thorfinnsson were the sons of Thorfinn Sigurdsson and Ingibiorg Finnsdottir. Through Ingibiorg's father Finn Arnesson and his wife, the family was related to the Norwegian Kings Olav II and Harald II.

    Their lives and times are recounted in the Orkneyinga Saga. The first mention of the brothers is when they accompanied the Norwegian king Harald Hardrade and Tostig Godwinson on the ill-fated expedition to England in 1066. Paul and Erlend were with Harald's son Olaf Kyrre, guarding the ships, when the battle of Stamford Bridge was fought. Along with Olaf they were allowed to leave by the English king Harold Godwinson. Olaf overwintered on Orkney with them and left on good terms with the Thorfinssons.

    The Orkneyinga saga says that Paul and Erlend were on good terms until their children grew to adulthood, after which the disputes between their sons led to a quarrel and open hostility between the brothers. As the disputes between the descendants of Paul and Erlend loomed large in the affairs of 12th century Orkney, the saga goes into some detail on their family relationships.

    Paul was married to an unnamed daughter of Norwegian earl Hakon Ivarsson. Two sons and four daughters are named. Of these, Hakon Paulsson played the greatest part in events.

    Erlend married Thora, daughter of Sumarlidi Ospaksson, and they had two sons and two daughters, while Erlend had a third, illegitimate daughter as well. Erland's daughter Gunnhild was married to Kol Kalison and Rognvald Kali Kolsson was their son. Erlend's son Magnus Erlendsson appears in the saga as earl, martyr and saint. The troubles between the earls began with rivalry between Hakon Paulsson and Magnus's brother Erling Erlendsson. Both are described as talented but also quarrelsome and arrogant.

    In 1098, King Magnus III of Norway took possession of the islands, deposing of both Erlend and Paul. Paul's son, Haakon Paulsson, then became regent on behalf of the Norwegian prince, the future King Sigurd I of Norway, who made Haakon earl in 1105.

    In literature
    The overthrow of Erland and Paul is a central plot point of Stephen Lawhead's novel The Iron Lance (HarperCollins Publishers; 1999.)2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Hugh Ross 3rd of Balnagowan1

M, #9988, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Janet (?) b. c 1375

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562418
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562417
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562416

Janet (?)1

F, #9989, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Janet (?) was born circa 1375 in Scotland.1
  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562418
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p68620.htm#i686200
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p68621.htm#i686201

William Ross 2nd of Balnagowan1

M, #9990, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Catherine McTyre b. c 1350

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562417
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562415
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56242.htm#i562416