Uisdean MacDonald 1st of Sleat1

M, #9811, b. circa 1425, d. 1498

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Uisdean MacDonald 1st of Sleat was also known as Hugh MacDonald 1st of Sleat.5
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1425 in Scotland.5
  • Death*: He died in 1498 in Sleat, Scotland.5
  • Biography: Hugh was the founder of the MacDonalds of Sleat.

    The first record of Ùisdean occur in the traditional histories of the shenachie MacVurich and Hugh Macdonald. According to the Sleat shenachie, Ùisdean, along with several young gentlemen from the Western Isles went on a raiding expedition to Orkney. The tradition runs that the Western Islesmen were victorious in their conflict with the Northern Islesmen, and that the Earl of Orkney was also slain. Ùisdean is then said to have ravaged Orkney, and carried off much loot. According to Angus and Archibald Macdonald, Ùisdean's expedition took place around 1460, when he did not appear to hold title to any of the lands his family who come to hold. In fact, in the year 1463, Eoin II, Lord of the Isles granted Ùisdean's older brother, Celestine, the 28 merklands of Sleat, in addition to extensive lands in west Ross given to him in the previous year. In 1469, Ùisdean received from the Earl of Ross the 30 merklands of Skeirhough in South Uist; the 12 merklands of Benbecula, and the merkland of Gergryminis also in Benbecula; the 2 merklands of Scolpig, the 4 merklands of Tallowmartin, the 6 merklands of Orinsay, the half merkland of Wanlis, all in North Uist; and also the 28 merklands of Sleat. The earliest Clann Ùisdein seat connected with the barony of Sleat was Dunscaith Castle, off the Sound of Sleat. Ùisdean played not a small part in securing the surrender of the Earl of Ross, for which he was promised by the king 20 pounds worth of land, in 1476. The lordship of the isles was forfeited in 1493, and Ùisdean obtained a royal confirmation for his lands granted to him by the Earl of Ross in 1469. Ùisdean died in 1498, and was buried at Sand, in North Uist.

    During his life, Ùisdean had several wives and several known children by other women. Some of Ùisdean's sons would go on to play a large part in the history of the clan in the early 16th century. His eldest son, Eoin, would go on to succeed him. Other notable sons included: Dòmhnall Gallach, son of the daughter of a prominent member of Clan Gunn (Caithness is called Gallaibh in Gaelic). Another son was Dòmhnall Hearach, so-called from the fact his mother was a daughter of Macleod of Harris, and where he probably spent a portion of his early life; Aonghas Collach, so-called from the fact his mother was a daughter of Maclean of Coll; Gilleasbaig Dubh was the son of a daughter of Torquil Macleod of the Lewes; and Aonghas Dubh was the son of a daughter Maurice Vicar of South Uist.6,7
  • Last Edited: 21 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p14697.htm#i146965
  2. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 150.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Islay,_Earl_of_Ross.
  4. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 88.
  5. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 154.
  6. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  7. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…

John MacDonald 2nd of Sleat1

M, #9812, b. circa 1450

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 21 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 154.

Countess Euphemia (?) of Ross1

F, #9813, b. circa 1325, d. between 1394 and 1398

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  • Biography*: Euphemia I (d. 1394 x 1398), also called Euphemia of Ross and Euphemia Ross, and sometimes incorrectly styled Euphemia Leslie and Euphemia Stewart (Scottish women in this period did not abandon natal names for married names), was a Countess of Ross in her own right.
    Biography
    Euphemia was the elder daughter of Uilleam III, the last O'Beolan Mormaer of Ross. Her first marriage was compelled against the wishes of her father. King David II desired to bestow an earldom on Walter de Leslie, who had distinguished himself in combat in Europe and in Alexandria, Egypt. To give the earldom of Ross to Leslie, he forced Euphemia to marry him and, on 23 October 1370, renewed the earldom of Ross to Euphemia’s father only on the condition that it pass to Euphemia and Leslie upon his death. The charter of the earldom of Ross and of the lands of Skye was made to them in their own favor and that of their heirs male and female in reversion.
    She married Leslie, by papal dispensation, dated 24 November 1366 (variously reported as December 1367), the dispensation being necessary in that Walter Leslie had had illicit intercourse with a woman related within the fourth degree of kinship with Euphemia.
    Leslie predeceased her in 1382, whereupon she married, secondly, Alexander Stewart, 1st Earl of Buchan, better known in history as "The Wolf of Badenoch." This marriage occurred on 24 or 25 July 1382. However, on 9 June 1392, Pope Clement VII issued a commission to dissolve this marriage and then on 5 and 15 December to grant a divorce. The date of Euphemia's death is not certain. She was still alive on 5 September 1394, and it is possible that 20 February 1394/5, usually assigned as the date of Stewart's death, was that of her own.
    Family
    By Sir Walter Leslie she had issue:
    Sir Alexander Leslie, Earl of Ross, who became Earl of Ross.
    Mariota, who married Donald (of Harlaw) Macdonald, and in her right, succeeded to the earldom of Ross, and carried it to a new family, the Macdonald Lords of the Isles.1
  • Birth*: Countess Euphemia (?) of Ross was born circa 1325 in Ross-shire, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: She married Sir Walter Leslie on 13 September 1366.2
  • Death*: Countess Euphemia (?) of Ross died between 1394 and 1398 in Scotland.1

Family: Sir Walter Leslie b. c 1325, d. 1382

  • Last Edited: 28 Mar 2017

Sir Walter Leslie1

M, #9814, b. circa 1325, d. 1382

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: Sir Walter Leslie (died 1382) was a 14th-century Scottish nobleman and crusader, one of the foremost knights of his time.
    Leslie was a younger son, probably the third son, of Sir Alexander Leslie of Leslie Castle in Aberdeenshire, by his wife Mary Abernethy, daughter and coheiress of Sir Alexander Abernethy. Along with his elder brother Norman, he obtained safe conduct through England on his way to Prussia to participate in a crusade against the pagans of that region. He had returned by 1356. He is then said to have gone to France, to aid the French in their wars with the English. He must have gone there more than once, for he was present at the Battle of Pontvallain in 1370, where he proved instrumental in the English defeat, and was rewarded by King Charles with a yearly pension of two hundred gold francs.
    He was present in Scotland in 1363, when King David granted him a pension of forty pounds sterling. Later that year, David obtained from Edward III of England a safe passage for Walter and Norman to travel to the Holy Land. They traveled via Italy; they appear as witnesses to a deal signed by the authorities of Florence with the notorious "White Band", a group of English mercenaries who had fought in the Hundred Years' War and were then plying their trade in Italy. Walter and Norman eventually joined the crusade of Peter King of Cyprus, as the latter attacked the Egyptian city of Alexandria. The city was captured, but King Peter was unable to hold it, and abandoned the city after looting it.
    Walter returned to Scotland in 1366, and was warmly welcomed by King David. The king was fascinated by the cult of the crusader, and Walter's previous exploits had already made him one of the royal favorites. As a reward for his latest exploits, David gave him permission to marry Euphemia, the daughter and heiress of the Earl of Ross, whom David coerced into allowing the marriage. The marriage took place on 13 September of the same year. After this, he appears to have remained in Scotland for a time, taking a prominent part in public affairs and frequently witnessing royal charters.
    When King David died in 1371, Walter may have been worried that the new king, Robert Stewart, who was an ally of the Earl of Ross, may have rescinded the patronage. However, the new king did not, and when Ross died in 1372, Euphemia inherited the title, and Walter became jure uxoris earl or lord of Ross.
    Walter died at Perth on 27 February 1382. He left two children, Alexander (the future Earl of Ross) and Mariota, who would marry Donald Lord of the Isles. Although Alexander did eventually inherit the earldom, de facto control of Ross passed into the hands of the Earl of Buchan, aka the "Wolf of Badenoch", who was Countess Euphemia's second husband before she divorced him in 1392.1
  • Birth*: Sir Walter Leslie was born circa 1325 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Countess Euphemia (?) of Ross on 13 September 1366.1
  • Death*: Sir Walter Leslie died in 1382 in Scotland.1

Family: Countess Euphemia (?) of Ross b. c 1325, d. bt 1394 - 1398

  • Last Edited: 28 Mar 2017

John Bisset Lord of the Glynns1

M, #9815, b. circa 1350, d. after 1380

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: The history of the Bissett family in Ireland can be studied independently from that of the originally identical family in Scotland, because of their unique experience following their arrival in Ulster in the early or mid-13th century. Here, while still remaining involved in Scottish affairs, the Bissetts would establish themselves as the Lords of the Glens of Antrim and quickly become equally, then eventually more involved in the politics of the Irish province, becoming among the most Gaelicised of all the so-called Anglo-Norman families in Ireland. The heads of the leading branch of the family soon adopted the Gaelic lineage style Mac Eoin Bissett (of the Glens), by which they are known in the Irish annals, and which translates as "Son/Descendant of John Byset", after a prominent ancestor born in Scotland. In a number of English and Anglo-Norman sources the same head of the family is referred to as the Baron Bissett, also with variants.

    This family style or title eventually split, in a manner, to provide both the modern County Antrim surname Mac Eoin, anglicised McKeon/McKeown, and the surname Bissett itself (in Ireland), the latter not easily distinguishable from the typically Scottish Bisset, for which the doubling of the final -t-, the typical practice in Ireland from the 16th century, has become more common in modern times. In the Irish language Bissett is usually written Bised (Biseid).2
  • Birth*: John Bisset Lord of the Glynns was born circa 1350 in Ireland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Sabia O'Neill, daughter of Hugh O'Neill, circa 1380 in Ireland.3
  • Death*: John Bisset Lord of the Glynns died after 1380 in Carrickfergus, Ireland; slain by the followers of Robert Savage.3

Family: Sabia O'Neill b. c 1350, d. 1387

  • Last Edited: 21 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 473.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_Eoin_Bissett_family
  3. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 22.

Sabia O'Neill1

F, #9816, b. circa 1350, d. 1387

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sabia O'Neill was born circa 1350 in Ireland.1
  • Marriage*: She married John Bisset Lord of the Glynns circa 1380 in Ireland.1
  • Married Name: As of circa 1380,her married name was Bisset.1
  • Death*: Sabia O'Neill died in 1387 in Ireland.1
  • Biography*: That the Bissetts were now formally allied to the O'Neills may be supported by several notices in 1387 of the death of one Sabia O'Neill (Sadhbh inghen Aodha Uí Néill), wife of the Mac Eoin Bissett, in which she is praised as "the choice woman of the descendants of Niall of the Nine Hostages in her time" and "a lady that far surpassed all the ladies of the Clanna Neill, in all good parts requisite for the character of a noble matron". All entries describe her as the daughter of one Aodh Ó Néill but who this might be is uncertain. The 19th century genealogist John O'Hart preserved the tradition that Aodh Reamhar Ó Néill, King of Ulster and King of Tyrone (died 1364), also called Aodh Mór, and the father Niall Mór above, also had four daughters but does not give their names nor whom they married.2

Family: John Bisset Lord of the Glynns b. c 1350, d. a 1380

  • Last Edited: 30 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 22.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_Eoin_Bissett_family

Hugh O'Neill1

M, #9817, b. circa 1325

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Hugh O'Neill was born circa 1325 in Ireland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 30 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 22.

Sir Patrick IV Dunbar 8th Earl of March1

M, #9818, b. 1242, d. 10 October 1308

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Patrick IV Dunbar 8th Earl of March was born in 1242 in Dunbar, Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died on 10 October 1308 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Ermengarde (?) circa 1350 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Patrick IV, Earl of March (1242 – 10 October 1308), sometimes called Patrick de Dunbar "8th" Earl of March, was the most important magnate in the border regions of Scotland. He was one of the Competitors for the Crown of Scotland.

    Late Succession
    Said to be aged 47 at his father's death, Sir Patrick de Dunbar, Knight, Earl of Dunbar, had livery of his father's lands on 14 May 1290. It appears that this Earl of Dunbar assumed the additional alternate title Earl of March, as he appeared designated Comes de Marchia at the parliament at Birgham in 1290, for the purpose of betrothing the Princess Margaret to the son of King Edward I of England. (This failed to come about).

    Ambition & Submission
    He was one of the Competitors for the Crown of Scotland in 1291, when he entered a formal claim in right of his great-grandmother, Ada, Countess of Dunbar, an illegitimate daughter of William The Lion, King of Scots. Like so many Scottish noblemen, including the Bruces, Dunbar held lands in England also which required knights' services, and he was summoned by King Edward I in 1294 to assist him at war in Gascony.

    Fealty Then Disobedience
    The Earl of Dunbar and March, with the Earl of Angus, Robert Bruce the elder, and his son the Earl of Carrick, swore fealty to the English King at Wark on 25 March 1296. In this turbulent year he appears to have been betrayed by his wife, who took the Scottish side and retained the castle of Dunbar for Balliol, but was obliged to surrender it to King Edward I of England in April 1296. In 1297 it appears that the Earl ceased his allegiance to Edward I, held his lands of the Scottish Crown, and was favourably received by Sir William Wallace, with whom he had been in bitter battle the previous year!

    In 1298 he was King's Lieutenant for Scotland, and in 1300 was present at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle, with his eldest son and heir, Patrick.

    Marriage
    The Earl married, before 1282, Marjorie, daughter of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan by his spouse Elizabeth, daughter of Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester by Ellen of Galloway.
    They had known issue:
    Patrick V, Earl of March (1285–1369).
    John de Dunbar of Derchester & Birkynside, father of George de Dunbar, 10th Earl of March.
    George de Dunbar, ancestor of the Mochrum family.
    Cecilia (married James Stewart, 5th High Steward)
    Isabella (married Roger Fitzjohn, 4th Baron Clavering.)1

Family 1: Marjorie Comyn b. c 1220

Family 2: Ermengarde (?) b. c 1325

  • Last Edited: 6 Dec 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_IV,_Earl_of_March.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_III,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39238.htm#i392377

Marjorie Comyn1

F, #9819, b. circa 1220

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Patrick IV Dunbar 8th Earl of March b. 1242, d. 10 Oct 1308

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_IV,_Earl_of_March.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10792.htm#i107919

Patrick III Dunbar 7th Earl of Dunbar1

M, #9820, b. 1213, d. 24 August 1289

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Patrick III Dunbar 7th Earl of Dunbar was born in 1213 in Dunbar, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Marjorie Comyn, daughter of Alexander Comyn 6th Earl of Buchan and Elizabeth de Quincy, circa 1240 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: Patrick III Dunbar 7th Earl of Dunbar died on 24 August 1289 in Whittingehame, Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Patrick III, 7th Earl of Dunbar (c. 1213 – 24 August 1289) was lord of the feudal barony of Dunbar and its castle, which dominated East Lothian, and the most important military personage in the Scottish Borders.

    Background
    Said to be aged 35 in 1248, he was the son of Patrick II, Earl of Dunbar (by Eupheme de Brus), who was son of Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar, who was son of Waltheof, Earl of Dunbar, who was descendant in male line of Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria. His successors controlled the marches, but the title Earl of March was only assumed by Patrick IV, Earl of March.

    Career
    Patrick did homage for his lands in England to King Henry III in 1249. The earl was part of the English faction who opposed the Comyns and in 1255 he and others procured the dismissal of the Comyns and their faction from power. The same year he was nominated Regent and Guardian of the King and Queen. In 1258 the Comyn's faction prevailed, and Earl Patrick was excluded from the government.

    In 1263 he founded a monastery for the Carmelites or White Friars in Dunbar; and led the left division of the Scottish army at the battle of Largs the same year. In 1266 when Magnus V of Norway ceded the Isle of Man and the Hebrides to King Alexander III of Scotland, the Earl of Dunbar's seal appears on the treaty, signed in Norway in 1266.

    Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, was second in the list of thirteen earls who signed the marriage contract of Princess Margaret of Scotland and King Eric of Norway in 1281. In 1284 he attended the parliament at Scone which declared the Princess Margaret of Norway to be heiress to the Scottish Crown.

    He died at Whittingehame, and was buried at Dunbar, East Lothian.

    Marriage
    He married firstly, before 1240, Cecily, daughter of John FitzRobert, Lord of Warkworth, Northumberland (died 1240).

    He married secondly Christiana, daughter of Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, the 'Competitor' (1210–1295), and had five known children:
    Patrick IV, Earl of March, a 'Competitor' (1242–1308), son and heir.
    Sir John de Dunbar, Knt.
    Sir Alexander de Dunbar, Knt.
    Agnes de Dunbar, who married Christell de Seton, 'in Jedburgh Forrest' (died c. 1300)
    Cecily (or Cecilia) de Dunbar, who married Sir James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland.

    Although some sources show Christiana de Brus as Patrick's wife and the mother of his children, other sources are in disagreement with this. According to The Scots Peerage, 'Cecilia filia Johannis' was his only recorded wife and mother of his sons, based on a charter by her eldest son. The Complete Peerage shows 'Cecil, da. of John' as his wife and states that Christian Bruce was erroneously assigned as his wife in Wood's Douglas.1

Family 1: Marjorie Comyn b. c 1220

Family 2: Christena de Brus b. c 1225

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_III,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_II,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10792.htm#i107919

Christena de Brus1

F, #9821, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Patrick III Dunbar 7th Earl of Dunbar b. 1213, d. 24 Aug 1289

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_III,_Earl_of_Dunbar.

Patrick II Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar1

M, #9822, b. 1185, d. 1249

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Patrick II Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar was born in 1185 in Dunbar, East Lothian, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Euphemia Stewart, daughter of Walter Stewart 3rd High Steward of Scotland and Beatrix Stewart of Angus, before 1213 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Patrick II Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar died in 1249 in the siege of Damietta, Egypt.1
  • Biography*: Patrick II (1185–1249), called "5th Earl of Dunbar", lord of Beanley, was a 13th-century Anglo-Scottish noble, and one of the leading figures during the reign of King Alexander II of Scotland.

    Said to be aged forty-six at the time of his father's death, this Patrick was the eldest son of Patrick I, Earl of Dunbar and Ada, daughter of King William I of Scotland. He probably succeeded to his father's lands some time before the latter's death on 31 December 1232, as his father was elderly and had been ill for some time.

    He renounced his claim to some disputed Marches in lower Lauderdale to the monks of Melrose, and in 1235 he, with Adam, Abbot of Melrose, and Gilbert, Bishop of Galloway, led an expedition against an uprising in Galloway. He accompanied King Alexander II of Scotland to York and was a witness and guarantor to the treaty with King Henry III of England, in 1237.

    Shortly after 1242 the Earl of Dunbar was sent to subdue the rebellious Thane of Argyll. The Earl held first rank among the twenty-four barons who guaranteed the Treaty of Peace with England in 1244.

    Holinshed relates, he accompanied Lindsay of Glenesk, and Stewart of Dundonald to crusade, where he died in 1249 at the siege of Damietta in Egypt.

    Before 1213, he married Euphemia (d. 1267 at Whittingehame), whom historians had previously believed to be daughter of Walter FitzAlan, 3rd High Steward of Scotland and lord of Kyle (i.e. Kyle Stewart), Strathgryfe and Bute.

    Euphemia's father was, however, certainly not Walter FitzAlan.
    Issue by Euphemia:
    Patrick, 7th Earl of Dunbar.
    Isabel de Dunbar, who married Roger FitzJohn, of Warkworth, Northumberland son of John FitzRobert(he d. before 22 June 1249 in Normandy).1

Family: Euphemia Stewart b. c 1190, d. 1267

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_II,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_I,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10781.htm

Euphemia Stewart1,2

F, #9823, b. circa 1190, d. 1267

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Patrick II Dunbar 5th Earl of Dunbar b. 1185, d. 1249

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_II,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p514.htm#i5132

Patrick I Dunbar 4th Earl of Dunbar1,2

M, #9824, b. 1152, d. 31 December 1232

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Patrick I Dunbar 4th Earl of Dunbar was born in 1152 in Dunbar, Scotland.1,2
  • Death*: He died on 31 December 1232 in Scotland.1,2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 31 December 1232 in the Cistercian nunnery of Eccles, Berwickshire, Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Patrick I (1152 – 1232), Earl of Dunbar and lord of Beanley, was a 13th-century Anglo-Scottish noble.

    He was the eldest son of Waltheof, Earl of Dunbar and Alina, and succeeded to his father's titles upon the latter's death in 1182.

    Patrick was one of the most important magnates to Kings William and Alexander II of Scotland, frequently witnessing their charters and traveling in their entourages whenever they went to the south of England to perform homage to the King of England for the properties in that realm.

    Patrick also served as Justiciar of Lothian as well as Warden of Berwick-upon-Tweed. Patrick held, like his predecessors (who were originally of the kindred of the native English earls of Northumberland), some of his most important lands were in northern England. Patrick's close association with the Scottish kings in fact got him in trouble, and perhaps because of Alexander II's pursuit of claims to the earldom of Northumberland, Waltheof found himself temporarily deprived of some of his lands by King John of England.

    Patrick married Ada (died 1200), an illegitimate daughter of King William the Lion, by whom he had four sons:
    Patrick (his successor),
    William, who witnessed a charter as "fratre Comitis" c1240-1248
    Robert,
    Fergus.

    His first wife predeceasing him, Patrick married again: Christina, widow of William de Brus, 3rd Lord of Annandale. No children are known by this marriage.
    The Earl of Dunbar died on 31 December 1232. He was buried at the Cistercian nunnery of Eccles, Berwickshire.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_I,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10781.htm
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltheof,_Earl_of_Dunbar.

Waltheof (?) Earl of Lothian or 'Dunbar'1

M, #9825, b. circa 1100, d. 1182

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Waltheof (?) Earl of Lothian or 'Dunbar' was born circa 1100 in Lothian, Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1182 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Waltheof (died 1182), Earl of Lothian or "Dunbar" and lord of Beanley, was a 12th-century Anglo-Scottish noble. He was the eldest son of Gospatric III, Earl of Lothian by his Scottish wife Deirdre.

    Waltheof's grandfather Gospatric II died at the Battle of the Standard in 1138, and Waltheof's father Gospatric III became earl. Richard of Hexham reported that in 1139 the son of Earl Gospatric served as a hostage to King Stephen of England after the following peace agreement. It is generally believed, although there can be no proof, that this son was the young Waltheof. Exactly how long Waltheof would have stayed as a hostage is not known, but Waltheof's father Gospatric died in 1166 and Waltheof was apparently earl already in 1165. This was probably because Gospatric had retired to Durham as a monk some time before his actual death.

    Waltheof's activities as earl included trying to persuade King William of Scotland not to invade England, which William did anyway in 1174; and arbitrating a dispute between the Abbot of Melrose and Richard de Morville. Waltheof married a woman named Alina, possibly Scottish, and by her fathered three children, Patrick (his successor), Causantín (Constantine) and Helen. He died in 1182, and is styled "Earl of Dunbar" by the Chronicle of Melrose. He was the first man to be called "earl of Dunbar" rather than "earl of Lothian".1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waltheof,_Earl_of_Dunbar.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10781.htm

Olaf the Black (?) King of Man & the Isles1

M, #9826, b. circa 1177

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Olaf the Black (?) King of Man & the Isles was born circa 1177 in Scotland*.1
  • Biography*: Óláfr Guðrøðarson, commonly known in English as Olaf the Black, was a mid 13th century sea-king who ruled the Isle of Man (Mann) and parts of the Hebrides. Óláfr was the son of Guðrøðr Óláfsson, King of the Isles, King of Dublin, and his wife Finnguala, granddaughter of Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland, King of Cenél nEógain. Óláfr was a younger son of his father; his elder brother Rögnvaldr more than likely had a different mother. According to the Chronicle of Mann, Guðrøðr appointed Óláfr as heir since he had been born "in lawful wedlock". Whether or not this is the case, on Guðrøðr's death in 1187 the Manxmen instead appointed Rögnvaldr as king, as he was a capable adult and Óláfr was a mere child. Rögnvaldr ruled the Crovan dynasty's island-kingdom for almost 40 years, during which time the half-brothers vied for the kingship.

    At one point Óláfr, who had been given possession of Lewis, complained to Rögnvaldr that his lands were not enough. Rögnvaldr's response was seize Óláfr and send him to the King of Scots, where he was imprisoned for almost seven years. Upon his release, Óláfr undertook a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, after which the half-brothers were reconciled and Rögnvaldr had Óláfr married to Lauon, the sister of his own wife. Sometime after 1217 this marriage was nullified by Reginald, Bishop of the Isles, who may have been an ally of Óláfr against Rögnvaldr. Óláfr then married Christina, a daughter of the King of Scots' protégé Ferchar, Earl of Ross. The chronicle claims that Rögnvaldr's bitter wife tricked their own son, Guðrøðr, into attempting to kill Óláfr; however, Óláfr narrowly escaped with his life and fled to the protection of his father-in-law on the mainland. Together with a loyal follower, one Páll Bálkason, Óláfr later defeated Guðrøðr on Skye.

    In the 1220s Rögnvaldr formed an alliance with Alan, Lord of Galloway, in an attempt to fend off Óláfr. Rögnvaldr married his daughter to one of Alan's sons, and it has been theorised that this son was intended to inherit the island-kingdom. Rögnvaldr's actions enraged the Manxmen and in 1226 they deposed him in favour of Óláfr. Rögnvaldr was later killed battling Óláfr in 1229.

    In 1230 Óláfr fled to Norway to seek military assistance against Alan and members of Clann Somairle. The Norwegian king's response was to send a fleet into the Isles under the command of Óspakr-Hákon, a member of Clann Somairle. Óspakr-Hákon was slain early in the campaign, after which Óláfr took control of the fleet and secured himself on Mann. The island-kingdom was divided between him and his mutilated nephew Guðrøðr, with the latter ruling the Hebridean portion and Óláfr ruling Mann itself. Guðrøðr was soon after killed on Lewis, and Óláfr ruled the whole Kingdom of Mann and the Isles peacefully, until his death in 1237. Óláfr's restoration on Mann was seen as a success by the Norwegians, and likely favourably viewed by the Scots as well; since the internal struggle between him and his rivals had been brought to an end. Óláfr was succeeded by his son, Haraldr. In all, three of Óláfr's sons ruled the Crovan dynasty's island-kingdom—the last of which, Magnús Óláfsson, was also the last of the dynasty to rule

    Background
    Óláfr was a member of the Crovan dynasty of sea-kings, a younger son of Guðrøðr Óláfsson, King of Dublin and the Isles (d. 1187), and grandson of Óláfr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles (d. 1153). Guðrøðr inherited a vast island-kingdom from his father, which encompassed the Hebrides—situated on the western seaboard of Scotland—and the Isle of Man (Mann), located in the middle of the northern Irish Sea, a strategically important point approximately equidistant from the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. In the mid 12th century Guðrøðr lost control of much of the Inner Hebrides to Somairle, Lord of Argyll, and was unable to regain these islands on Somairle's death in 1164. Like his predecessors, Guðrøðr is sometimes anachronistically styled "King of Mann" in secondary sources.[4] This is because Guðrøðr, his sons Rögnvaldr and Óláfr, and his father Óláfr styled themselves Rex Insularum ("King of the Isles"); it was not until the reigns of Guðrøðr's grandsons (Óláfr's sons) that the leading members of the dynasty adopted the Latin title Rex Mannie et Insularum ("King of Mann and the Isles").

    Óláfr's epithet "the black", considered to refer to his hair colour, is recorded in the Orkneyinga saga and within a 13th-century English document, the Close Roll.

    Ascension of Rögnvaldr Guðrøðarson
    According to the Chronicle of Mann Guðrøðr, in 1187, instructed that his younger son Óláfr should succeed to the kingdom, since Óláfr had been born "in lawful wedlock". Other contemporary sources record that two decades prior to this the papal legate, Vivian Cardinal priest of St Stephen in Celio Monte, visited Mann for a fortnight in late December 1176, as he sailed from Scotland to Ireland. The chronicle records that during his visit the cardinal formally married Guðrøðr to Finnguala, daughter of an unnamed son of Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland (d. 1166). Finnguala's father was more than likely Niall Mac Lochlainn, King of Cenél nEógain (died 1176). Since the chronicle contradicts itself in detailing Óláfr's age, it is uncertain whether he was born during the year of his father's marriage, or a few years before—what is certain, however, is that Rögnvaldr was older than Óláfr.

    Although the chronicle indirectly implies that Rögnvaldr was also a son of Finnguala, there is evidence that strongly suggests that he had a different mother. Within a letter from Óláfr to Henry II, King of England, Óláfr describes Rögnvaldr as a bastard. Further evidence is found within a Gaelic praise-poem of Rögnvaldr, which states that he was a son of Sadb, an otherwise unknown Irishwoman who may have been an unrecorded wife or concubine of Guðrøðr.[8] The chronicle records that because Óláfr was only a child at the time of his father's death, the Manxmen chose Rögnvaldr to rule instead, describing him as a vigorous and hardier man. The chronicle states that Rögnvaldr began his reign the following year, in 1188.

    In the Outer Isles, and imprisonment
    The Chronicle of Mann states that Rögnvaldr gave Óláfr possession of Lewis, which is described as an island; Lewis is in fact the northern part of the island of Lewis and Harris, which is by far the largest island in Scotland. The northern part of the island is rather flat and boggy, while the southern part, Harris, is more mountainous. The chronicle seems, however, to have conflated the northern and southern parts as it describes Óláfr's island as being mountainous and rocky, completely unsuitable for cultivation, and declares that the island's small population lived mostly by hunting and fishing. The chronicle relates that Óláfr was unable to support himself and his followers, because of his poor land, and states that he led "a sorry life".

    Óláfr's time in the Isles is confirmed by several Icelandic sources which recount how, in 1202, Guðmundr Arason attempted to sail from Iceland to Norway to become consecrated as the Bishop of Hólar. These saga accounts relate how the Icelanders encountered a severe storm and were blown far off course before being forced to make landfall in the Hebrides. The island they landed upon was almost certainly Sanday, a tiny tidal island linked to its larger neighbour Canna, the westernmost of the Small Isles. According to the saga the Icelanders were pressured numerous times to pay a landing-tax to a king named Óláfr. The king encountered by the Icelanders is considered to have been Óláfr, although at this point in history the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles is not known to have encompassed the Small Isles. One possibility is that Óláfr, like the Icelanders, may have been temporarily stranded on the tidal island, and that he may have taken advantage of the storm-stricken churchmen to offset the poverty that is assigned to him by the chronicle.

    The chronicle also relates that Óláfr went to Rögnvaldr, who was also living in the Hebrides, and asked him for more land. Rögnvaldr's response was, according to the chronicle, to have Óláfr seized and sent to William I, King of Scots, who kept him imprisoned for almost seven years. The chronicle states that, on the seventh year, William died and that just before his death ordered the release of all his political prisoners. William is known to have died on 4 December 1214. The chronicle relates that upon gaining his freedom, Óláfr met with Rögnvaldr on Mann, and then set out on a pilgrimage with a significant number of noblemen.[11] Óláfr's intended destination is considered to have been the shrine of St James at Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

    Marriages, and nephew Guðrøðr Rögnvaldsson
    Upon Óláfr's return the chronicle says that Rögnvaldr welcomed him back and had him marry Lauon, the daughter of a certain nobleman from Kintyre, who was also the sister of his own wife. The precise identification of the father-in-law of Óláfr and Rögnvaldr is uncertain, but he may have been a member of Clann Somairle; possibly Ragnall mac Somairle, or his son Ruaidrí, who are both styled Lord of Kintyre in documents contemporaneous to their reigns. The chronicle states that Rögnvaldr then gave Lewis back to Óláfr, where the newly-weds proceeded to live until the arrival of Reginald, Bishop of the Isles (d. c. 1226), sometime later. According to the chronicle the bishop disapproved of Óláfr's marriage, as Óláfr had formerly had a concubine who was a cousin of Lauon. A synod was then assembled and the chronicle records that the marriage was nullified. Although at first glance the marriage appears to have been doomed, as it was deemed "as being within prohibited degree of kinship", it may be that this was merely a convenient excuse, and that the contention between the half-brothers may have played a part in its demise. It is also possible that Bishop Reginald may have released Óláfr from an arranged marriage which had been forced upon him; the bishop and Óláfr appear to have been close, as the chronicle describes Bishop Reginald as a son of Óláfr's sister, and notes that Óláfr was glad at his coming to Lewis. Furthermore, it was Bishop Reginald who annulled the marriage which Rögnvaldr had arranged for Óláfr. In fact, when the previous Bishop of the Isles died in 1217, Bishop Reginald had vied with a rival candidate for the position—a certain Nicholas—and there is evidence to suggest that Reginald was supported by Óláfr, while Óláfr's half-brother Rögnvaldr supported the bid of Nicholas.

    The chronicle states that Óláfr then married Christina, daughter of Ferchar mac an t-sagairt (d. c. 1251). Óláfr's father-in-law emerges from historical obscurity in 1215 and, by the mid 1220s (about the time of, or not long after, the marriage), Ferchar had obtained the Earldom of Ross from Alexander II, King of Scots (d. 1249) for his part in defeating the Meic Uilleim northern rebellion in 1215. The chronicle declares that Óláfr's separation from Lauon had enraged her sister, and Rögnvaldr's bitter queen sought to sow discord between the half-brothers. If the chronicle is to be believed, the queen secretly wrote under her husband's name to their son Guðrøðr, ordering him to seize and kill Óláfr. The chronicle states that Guðrøðr dutifully gathered a force on Skye and proceeded to Lewis, where he laid waste to most of the island before returning to Skye—Óláfr had narrowly escaped with a few men and fled to the protection of his father-in-law, on the mainland in Ross.

    One of the more powerful men in the Isles at this time, according to the chronicle, was a sheriff on Skye named Páll Bálkason. Páll refused to take up arms against Óláfr and he left Skye to live in Ross with Óláfr. After several days Páll and Óláfr secretly returned to Skye, according to the chronicle, and learned that Guðrøðr was stationed on the "island of St Columba". The location and identity of the island are unknown for certain, although Iona and various places and islands on Skye are possible. The chronicle tells how Óláfr and Páll rounded up their forces and dragged five ships from the seashore, which is described as being about two furlongs from the island, and subsequently surrounded Guðrøðr's island. The chronicle states that Óláfr and Páll assaulted the island at about 2–3 pm, and that everyone one of Guðrøðr's followers who was captured outside of the enclosure of the church was slain. Guðrøðr was seized, blinded and castrated. The chronicle claims that Óláfr did not consent to Guðrøðr's brutal mutilation, but was unable to prevent it due to Páll.

    Rise of Óláfr, and fall of Rögnvaldr
    Óláfr's marriage to the daughter of one of Alexander the King of Scots' most trusted northern lords, and the lord's assistance rendered to Óláfr and Páll, may suggest that Óláfr had gained Alexander's approval against Rögnvaldr. In the summer following the defeat of Guðrøðr on Skye, the chronicle states that Óláfr took hostages from the Hebridean portion of the kingdom and, with a fleet of 32 ships, landed on Mann and confronted Rögnvaldr directly. It was then agreed that the kingdom would be split between the two—with Rögnvaldr keeping Mann itself along with the title of king, and Óláfr retaining the Hebridean portions. In the 1220s Alexander began to extend Scottish royal authority into what is today the western coast Scotland, making several expeditions into Argyll. A this time Ruaidrí may have been forced from his lands in Kintyre and replaced by Alexander, installing Domnall mac Ragnaill, a more palatable member of Clann Somairle, in his place. Óláfr's control of Lewis and Skye, bordering the domains of Clann Somairle, may have made him appear as a potentially valuable ally to Alexander's eyes, who wished to rein in the more dangerous members of Clann Somairle.

    Alexander played both sides in the struggle between Óláfr and Rögnvaldr however, and encouraged one of his most powerful lords Alan, Lord of Galloway (d. 1234), to enter into the fray as an ally of Rögnvaldr. In 1225, according to the chronicle, Rögnvaldr and Alan attempted to take possession of Óláfr's Hebridean portion of the kingdom; however, the Manxmen were unwilling to wholeheartedly aid the cause and nothing came of the expedition. A short time later the chronicle records that Rögnvaldr's daughter was married to Alan's son. Such a marriage, between Rögnvaldr's daughter and Alan's illegitimate son Thomas, gave Alan a stake in the kingship since Thomas was likely to succeed. The possibility of control over a future ruler on Mann led Alexander to lend his consent to the union. The marriage was beneficial to Rögnvaldr as well, since he could rely on Alan's military might to fend off his troublesome half-brother. Unfortunately for Rögnvaldr, the chronicle records that the Manxmen were angered by the marriage and they consequently appointed Óláfr as their king. At this point Rögnvaldr seems to have gone into exile in Galloway, at the court of his ally, Alan. The chronicle dates Óláfr's kingship to have begun in 1226, and that he ruled the kingdom peacefully for the next two years.

    The chronicle records that in 1228, while Óláfr and his chiefs were away from Mann, the island was attacked and devastated by Alan, his brother Thomas, Earl of Atholl (d. 1231), and Rögnvaldr. It was only when Alan left with most of his force that Óláfr was able to regain control of the island. Rögnvaldr sailed from Galloway in the winter of the same year, landed on Mann, and burnt all the ships of Óláfr and his chiefs. The chronicle states that Rögnvaldr stayed at Ronaldsway for forty days; and that he won over the hearts of the southern inhabitants of the island. Óláfr and his forces arrived at Tynwald on 14 February 1229, where they attacked Rögnvaldr and his men. The chronicle claims that Rögnvaldr was treacherously killed by his own men, without the prior knowledge of Óláfr, and also notes that Óláfr never avenged his half-brother's death.

    Norwegian intervention into the Isles
    The Chronicle of Lanercost states that a Norwegian fleet sailed down the west coast of Scotland in 1230 with a certain Óspakr-Hákon (d. 1230), who had been appointed King of the Isles by the King of Norway; also amongst the fleet were Óláfr and Guðrøðr. The Eirspennill version of Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar, the most authoritative version of the saga, gives a much more illustrative account; although it does not specifically state that Guðrøðr travelled with the fleet from Norway. The saga states that in the summer before the fleet left Norway, news of warring in the Isles reached the Norwegian king, Hákon Hákonarson (d. 1263). Óláfr is described as a faithful vassal of the Norwegian king, while two Hebridean noblemen, Donnchad and Dubgall—both sons of Dubgall mac Somairle (fl. 1175)—are described as unfaithful. The saga relates how the Norwegian king summoned an assembly that winter, appointed Óspakr-Hákon King of the Isles, and decided upon a plan to give him a military force to command in the Isles.

    Members of Clann Somairle seem to have been attacking parts of the Crovan dynasty's island-kingdom, possibly taking advantage of the warring between Rögnvaldr and Óláfr. It may have been that they were also lending support to Alan's destabilising incursions into the Isles. Whatever the case, it is clear that the state of affairs in the Isles was chaotic and, because of Óláfr's inability to control of the situation, the formidable Hákon decided to pacify the region using Óspakr-Hákon. In fact, the saga notes that Óspakr-Hákon was also a son of Dubgall, and it is likely that his family connections would have made him a palatable over-king of the unruly Clann Somairle. Óspakr-Hákon's kingdom was likely meant to encompass the territories of Clann Somairle, and control of the Crovan dynasty's domain may have been retained by the dynasty.

    The saga states that, with the coming of spring, Hákon ordered the preparation of Óspakr-Hákon's fleet. While preparations were under way Óláfr came to the king at Bergen, and reported the unrest in the Isles, noting that Alan had assembled a powerful army and was causing unrest in the region. When the fleet left Norway for Orkney, Óláfr accompanied it on-board Páll Bálkason's ship. When the fleet reached Orkney, several ship-commanders sailed to Skye, where they defeated a certain Þórkell Þórmóðsson in a sea-battle. The fleet then united at Islay, and was strengthened by Óspakr-Hákon's brothers and their followers, and swelled in size to 80 ships. The fleet then sailed south and around the Mull of Kintyre to Bute, where the force invaded the island and took the castle whilst suffering heavy casualties. The fleet then sailed to Kintyre, and Óspakr-Hákon fell ill and died. The Chronicle of Mann, however, specifically states that Óspakr-Hákon was struck by a stone and killed, and later buried on Iona.

    The chronicle continues by stating that Óláfr then took control of the fleet whereupon he led it to Mann, where he and Guðrøðr divided the kingdom between themselves—with Óláfr retaining Mann, and Guðrøðr controlling the Hebridean portions; in fact, it is possible that Hákon may have originally intended for Óláfr and Guðrøðr to split the kingdom of Mann and the Isles between themselves. According to the saga the Norwegians left in the spring, sailing north to Kintyre where they encountered and battled a strong force of Scots with both sides losing many men during the ensuing battle. The saga then recounts how the fleet sailed north to Lewis and displaced a certain Þórmóðr Þórkelson, before travelling to Orkney, from where most of the fleet sailed back to Norway. Páll, however, is stated to have remained behind, and to have been slain by Guðrøðr several weeks later. The saga notes that Guðrøðr was also slain in the Isles a short time after this. The Chronicle of Mann specifically places Guðrøðr's death on Lewis, although it does not cast any light upon the circumstances. Even so, what is certain is that it was only after Guðrøðr's death that Óláfr's kingship was safe from any rival claim.

    The campaign is regarded to have been the gravest threat to the Scottish kingdom since John, King of England's (d. 1216) northern campaigning and invasion in 1216. Although Óláfr's restoration on Mann was claimed as a success by the Norwegians, it was probably accepted gladly by the Scots as well; considering Óláfr's familial relationship with Alexander's protégé Ferchar and the consolidation of the Crovan dynasty after years of chaos. Óláfr consequently ruled the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles peacefully until his death, seven years later. At some point during his reign, he is known to have granted certain commercial rights and protections to the monks of the monastery of Holm Cultram. The chronicle states that he died on St Patrick's Isle on 21 May 1237 and was buried at St Mary's Abbey, Rushen. There is a possibility that a coffin-lid or grave-slab found at Rushen may be associated with Óláfr, or of two of his sons who are known to have been buried there (Rögnvaldr and Magnús).

    Family
    Óláfr is known to have been survived by three children; Haraldr (d. 1248), Rögnvaldr (d. 1249), and Magnús (d. 1265)—all of whom ruled as kings in their own right. Although the mother of Óláfr's children is not known for certain, she is thought to have been Christina. The Chronicle of Mann states that Óláfr's immediate successor, Haraldr, was only fourteen years old at the time of his father's death, which dates his birth to about the time of the marriage of Óláfr and Christina.

    There is evidence to suggest that Óláfr might have had a fourth son named Guðrøðr. For example, the chronicle relates how the governor of Mann, described as a kinsman of Haraldr, fled from the king in 1238 and set sail for Wales, taking with him his foster-son Guðrøðr Óláfsson. When the fleeing ship reached the Welsh coast it was wrecked and, according to the chronicle, Guðrøðr perished on board. Furthermore, amongst the names of witnesses within a quitclaim between Llywelyn ap Gruffudd (d. 1282) and Ralph de Mortimer (d. 1246), thought to date to about 1241, there is a certain Guðrøðr who appears in Latin as Godredo filio regis Mannie ("Guðrøðr, son of the King of Mann"). Although the possibility has been raised that the two sources may refer to the same man, there is no further evidence to confirm it.

    Legacy
    The Manx Sword of State, a ceremonial sword used at the annual Tynwald Day sittings at St John's, Isle of Man, and whenever the Tynwald sits at the Legislative Chambers in Douglas, Isle of Man, is popularly said to have belonged to Óláfr. The sword, which has a 29 in (74 cm) steel blade and 9 in (23 cm) inch hardwood hilt, is sometimes said to have been brought back from Spain when Óláfr returned from his pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela; however, recent analysis of the sword has determined that it dates no earlier than the 15th century, and that the blade dates only to the 17th century. The current understanding is that the sword itself was made for the Tynwald meetings of 1417 or 1422.

    Several Scottish clans that were historically seated on Lewis have traditionally been ascribed a descent from Óláfr. The MacLeods claim a descent from Leod (Old Norse Ljótr), who is popularly said to have been a son of Óláfr. Clan traditions dating to the late 18th century link Leod with Óláfr, and heraldic evidence dating to the late 17th century may be the earliest indication of such a claim; however, recent research into the MacLeods' traditional ancestry has determined such claims of descent from Óláfr are unsupportable. Other Lewis clans have been linked with Óláfr in various traditions, such as the Morrisons of Ness and their adversaries the Macaulays of Uig, although there is no supporting evidence that Óláfr left any descendants on the island.3




Family:

  • Last Edited: 18 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S927] F.S.A., Scot Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacLeods, page 5.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olaf_the_Black

Sir Gilbert Keith 3rd of Inverugie, 1st of Ludquhairn1

M, #9827, b. circa 1425, d. 20 May 1527

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: (?) Ogston of Ludquhairn b. c 1425

  • Last Edited: 22 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56243.htm#i562423
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p46352.htm#i463515

(?) Ogston of Ludquhairn1

F, #9828, b. circa 1425

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Sir Gilbert Keith 3rd of Inverugie, 1st of Ludquhairn b. c 1425, d. 20 May 1527

  • Last Edited: 22 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56243.htm#i562423
  2. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…

Sir Patrick Keith 2nd of Inverugie1

M, #9829, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 22 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p46352.htm#i463515

Elizabeth Ogilvy of Lintrathen1

F, #9830, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 22 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p46352.htm#i463515
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p264.htm#i2635

Sir John Ogilvy of Lintrathen1

M, #9831, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p264.htm#i2635

William Sutherland of Berriedale1

M, #9832, b. circa 1435

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: William Sutherland of Berriedale was born circa 1435 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392088

Alexander Sutherland of Duffus1

M, #9833, b. circa 1400, d. circa 1484

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 21 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392088
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392085
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Duffus

Morella Chisholm1

F, #9834, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Alexander Sutherland of Duffus b. c 1400, d. c 1484

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392088
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392086

Henry Sutherland of Torboll1

M, #9835, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Henry Sutherland of Torboll was born circa 1375 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392085
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392084
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392083

Nicholas Sutherland1

M, #9836, b. before 1333

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Mary le Cheyne b. c 1350

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392084
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2587.htm#i25864
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_de_Moravia,_4th_Earl_of_Sutherland.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392083

Mary le Cheyne1

F, #9837, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p39209.htm#i392083

Kenneth de Moravia 4th Earl of Sutherland1

M, #9838, b. circa 1300, d. 19 July 1333

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Kenneth de Moravia 4th Earl of Sutherland was born circa 1300 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died on 19 July 1333 in killed at the Battle of Halidon Hill.2
  • Biography*: Kenneth de Moravia (also known as Kenneth Sutherland) (died 19 July 1333) was the 4th Earl of Sutherland and chief of Clan Sutherland. He was the second son of William de Moravia, 2nd Earl of Sutherland. Kenneth’s mother is unknown.

    Kenneth succeeded to the earldom on the death of his brother William de Moravia, 3rd Earl of Sutherland, in about December 1330.

    Kenneth is thought to have married Mary (or Marjorie) of Mar, the widow of John of Strathbogie, Earl of Atholl who was executed by the English in London on 7 November 1306. She was the daughter of Domhnall I, Earl of Mar and Helen verch Llewellyn, a daughter of Llewelyn the Great. Mary’s sister, Isabella of Mar, was the first wife of Robert the Bruce (Robert I, King of Scotland).

    Kenneth had issue:
    1. William, 5th Earl of Sutherland.
    2. Nicolas Sutherland, the surname being now fully adopted, ancestor of the Sutherlands, Lords Duffus.
    3. Eustachia, married, about December 1330, to Gilbert Moray, son and heir of Reginald Moray of Culbin.

    Kenneth de Moravia was killed at the Battle of Halidon Hill on 19 July 1333 during the Wars of Scottish Independence, where together with Hugh, Earl of Ross, he led the vanguard of the Scottish army.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 21 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2587.htm#i25864
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_de_Moravia,_4th_Earl_of_Sutherland.

William de Moravia 2nd Earl of Sutherland1

M, #9839, b. 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Margaret (?) of Mar b. c 1275

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_de_Moravia,_4th_Earl_of_Sutherland.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2587.htm#i25864

Margaret (?) of Mar1

F, #9840, b. circa 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2587.htm#i25864