(?) (?) daughter of Thane of Calder1

F, #9691, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 7 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505177

Celestine MacDonald of Lochalsh1

M, #9692, b. circa 1425

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Celestine MacDonald of Lochalsh was born circa 1425 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Nov 2016

Adelaide (?) of Alsace1

F, #9693, b. circa 965

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Henry (?) Count of Speyer b. c 965, d. 995

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Sir Robert de Holland of Upholland1

M, #9694, b. circa 1250

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Elizabeth (?) b. c 1250

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Holland,_1st_Baron_Holand.

Elizabeth (?)1

F, #9695, b. circa 1250

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Holland,_1st_Baron_Holand.

William de Samlesbury1

M, #9696, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William de Samlesbury was born circa 1225 in England.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Holland,_1st_Baron_Holand.

William I (?) Count of Geneva1

M, #9697, b. circa 1132, d. 25 July 1195

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Marguerite Beatrice de Faucigny b. c 1135

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Marguerite Beatrice de Faucigny1

F, #9698, b. circa 1135

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William I (?) Count of Geneva b. c 1132, d. 25 Jul 1195

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

James (?) Lord of Avesnes, Conde & Leuze1

M, #9699, b. 1152, d. 7 September 1191

James of Avesnes
Coat of Arms

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: James (also Jacques or Jacob; 1152 – 7 September 1191) was a son of Nicholas d'Oisy, Lord of Avesnes and Matilda de la Roche. He was the lord of Avesnes, Condé, and Leuze from 1171. In November 1187, James joined the Third Crusade as leader of a detachment of French, Flemish, and Frisian crusaders arriving by ship on the Israeli coast near Acre around 10 September 1189. James and his men came as military reinforcements for the Siege of Acre. At the Battle of Arsuf, James was thrown from his saddle and, after slaying fifteen enemy warriors, was himself cut down. The next day, a search party of Hospitallers and Templars found his body on the battlefield. It was taken back to Arsuf and buried there in a ceremony attended by Richard the Lionheart and Guy of Lusignan.

    He married Adela (died 1185), daughter of Bouchard of Guise, and was the father of:
    Walter II of Avesnes
    James, lord of Landrechies
    William (died 1219)
    Bouchard IV of Avesnes
    Matilda, married (1) Nicholas IV of Rumigny and (2) Louis IV of Chiny
    Adelaide, married Rogier of Rosoy (died 1246)
    Ida (1180–1216), married Engelbert IV of Edingen
    Adela, married (1) Henry III of Grandpré and (2) Ralph, Count of Soissons.1
  • Birth*: James (?) Lord of Avesnes, Conde & Leuze was born in 1152 in Avesnes, France*.1
  • Death*: He died on 7 September 1191 in Avesnes, France*.1
  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Roger de Clare 2nd Earl Hertford, 5th Lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan1,2

M, #9700, b. 1116, d. 1173

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  • Biography*: Roger de Clare, 2nd Earl of Hertford, 5th Lord of Clare, 5th lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan (1116–1173) was a powerful Norman noble during the 12th century England. He succeeded to the Earldom of Hertford and Honor of Clare, Tonbridge and Cardigan when his brother Gilbert died without issue.

    Life
    Roger was a son of Richard Fitz Gilbert de Clare and Alice de Gernon.[2] In 1153, he appears with his cousin, Richard Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, as one of the signatories to the Treaty of Wallingford, in which Stephen recognises Prince Henry as his successor. He is found signing charters at Canterbury and Dover in 1156. Next year, according to Powell, he received from Henry II a grant of whatever lands he could conquer in South Wales. This is probably only an expansion of the statement of the Welsh chronicles that in this year (about 1 June) he entered Cardigan and 'stored' the castles of Humfrey, Aberdovey, Dineir, and Rhystud. Rhys ap Gruffydd, the prince of South Wales, appears to have complained to Henry II of these encroachments ; but being unable to obtain redress from the king of England sent his nephew Einion ab Anarawd to attack Humfirey and the other Norman fortresses. The 'Annales Cambriæ seem to assign these events to the year 1159 ; and the 'Brut' adds that Prince Rhys burnt all the French castles in Cardigan.

    In 1158 or 1160, Clare advanced with an army to the relief of Carmarthen Castle, then besieged by Rhys, and pitched his camp at Dinweilir. Not daring to attack the Welsh prince, the English army offered peace and retired home. In 1163, Rhys again invaded the conquests of Clare, who, we learn incidentally, has at some earlier period caused Einion, the capturer of Humfrey Castle, to be murdered by domestic treachery. In 1164 he assisted with the Constitutions of Clarendon. From his munificence to the Church and his numerous acts of piety, Roger was called the "Good Earl of Hertford". He was the founder of Little Marcis Nunnery prior to 1163.

    A second time all Cardigan was wrested from the Norman hands ; and things now wore so threatening an aspect that Henry II led an army into Wales in 1165, although, according to one Welsh account, Rhys had made his peace with the king in 1164, and had even visited him in England. The causes assigned by the Welsh chronicle for this fresh outbreak of hostility are that Henry failed to keep his promises — presumably of restitution — and secondly that Roger, earl of Clare, was honourably receiving Walter, the murderer of Rhys's nephew Einion. For the third time we now read that Cardigan was overrun and the Norman castles burnt; but it is possible that the events assigned by the 'Annales Cambræ' to the year 1165 are the same as those assigned by the 'Brut y Tywysogion' to 1163.

    In the intervening years, Clare had been abroad, and is found signing charters at Le Mans, probably about Christmas 1160, and again at Rouen in 1161 (Eyton, pp. 52, 53). In July 1163 he was summoned by Becket to do homage in his capacity of steward to the archbishops of Canterbury for the castle of Tunbridge. In his refusal, which he based on the grounds that he held the castle of the king and not of the archbishop, he was supported by Henry II (Ralph de Diceto, i. 311; Gervase of Canterbury, i. 174, ii. 391). Next year he was one of the ‘recognisers’ of the constitutions of Clarendon (Select Charters, p. 138). Early in 1170 he was appointed one of a band of commissioners for Kent, Surrey, and other arts of southern England (Gerv. Cant. i. 216). His last known signature seems to belong to June or July 1171, and is dated abroad from Chevaillée. He appears to have died in 1173, and certainly before July or August 1174, when we find Richard, earl of Clare, his son, coming to the king at Northampton.

    Family
    Roger married Maud de St. Hilary, daughter of James de St. Hilary and Aveline. Together they had seven children:
    Mabel de Clare, d. 1204, m. (c. 1175), Nigel de Mowbray.
    Richard de Clare, b. c. 1153, Tonbridge Castle, Kent, England, d. 28 November 1217, 3rd Earl of Hertford
    James de Clare
    Eveline (Aveline) de Clare, d. 4 June 1225, m. (c. 1204), Geoffrey IV Fitz Piers (Fitz Peter), 1st Earl of Essex. m. Sir William Munchensy, (b. c. 1184), son of Warin de Munchensy and Agnes Fitz John.
    Roger de Clare, d. 1241, Middleton, Norfolk, England.
    John de Clare
    Henry de Clare.1
  • Birth*: Roger de Clare 2nd Earl Hertford, 5th Lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan was born in 1116 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married (?) Maude de St. Hilary, daughter of James de St. Hilary & Aveline, circa 1150 in England.1,4,5
  • Death*: Roger de Clare 2nd Earl Hertford, 5th Lord of Tonbridge, 5th Lord of Cardigan died in 1173 in England.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Clare,_2nd_Earl_of_Hertford.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p408.htm#i4074
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15835.htm#i158349
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_of_Avesnes
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p462.htm#i4617

(?) Maude de St. Hilary1

F, #9701, b. circa 1125

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Clare,_2nd_Earl_of_Hertford.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_of_Avesnes
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p462.htm#i4617

James de St. Hilary & Aveline1

M, #9702, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: James de St. Hilary & Aveline was born circa 1100 in England.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_de_Clare,_2nd_Earl_of_Hertford.

Richard fitz Gilbert1

M, #9703, b. circa 1084, d. 15 April 1136

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15835.htm#i158349

Edmund Fitz Alan 9th Earl of Arundel1

M, #9704, b. 1 May 1285, d. 17 November 1326

The Earl of Arundel

Arundel and Hugh Despenser the Elder before Queen Isabella. From Froissart's Chronicles.

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel (1 May 1285 – 17 November 1326) was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard FitzAlan,8th Earl of Arundel, died on 9 March 1301, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

    After Edward I's death, Arundel became part of the opposition to the new king Edward II, and his favourite Piers Gaveston. In 1311 he was one of the so-called Lords Ordainers who assumed control of government from the king. Together with Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was responsible for the death of Gaveston in 1312. From this point on, however, his relationship to the king became more friendly. This was to a large extent due to his association with the king's new favourite Hugh Despenser the Younger, whose daughter was married to Arundel's son. Arundel supported the king in suppressing rebellions by Roger Mortimer and other Marcher Lords, and eventually also Thomas of Lancaster. For this he was awarded with land and offices.

    His fortune changed, however, when the country was invaded in 1326 by Mortimer, who had made common cause with the king's wife, Queen Isabella. Immediately after the capture of Edward II, the queen, Edward III's regent, ordered Arundel executed, his title forfeit and his property confiscated. Arundel's son and heir Richard only recovered the title and lands in 1331, after Edward III had taken power from the regency of Isabella and Mortimer. In the 1390s, a cult emerged around the late earl. He was venerated as a martyr, though he was never canonised.

    Family and early life
    Edmund FitzAlan was born in the Castle of Marlborough, in Wiltshire, on 1 May 1285. He was the son of Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel, and his wife, Alice of Saluzzo, daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Richard had been in opposition to the king during the political crisis of 1295, and as a result he had incurred great debts and had parts of his land confiscated. When Richard died in 09/03/1301, Edmund's wardship was given to John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey. Warenne's only son, William, had died in 1286, so his daughter Alice was now heir apparent to the Warenne earldom. Alice was offered in marriage to Edmund, who for unknown reasons initially refused her. By 1305 he had changed his mind, however, and the two were married.

    In April 1306, shortly before turning twenty-one, Edmund was granted possession of his father's title and land. On 22 May 1306, he was knighted by Edward I, along with the young Prince Edward – the future Edward II. The knighting was done in expectation of military service the Scottish Wars, and after the campaign was over, Arundel was richly rewarded. Edward I pardoned the young earl a debt of £4,234. This flow of patronage continued after the death of Edward I in 1307; in 1308 Edward II returned the hundred of Purslow to Arundel, an honour that Edward I had confiscated from Edmund's father. There were also official honours in the early years of Edward II's reign. At the new king's coronation on 25 February 1308, Arundel officiated as chief butler (or pincerna), a hereditary office of the earls of Arundel.

    Opposition to Edward II
    Though the reign of Edward II was initially harmonious, he soon met with opposition from several of his earls and prelates. At the source of the discontent was the king's relationship with the young Gascon knight Piers Gaveston, who had been exiled by Edward I, but was recalled immediately upon Edward II's accession. Edward's favouritism towards the upstart Gaveston was an offence to the established nobility, and his elevation to the earldom of Cornwall was particularly offensive to the established nobility. A group of magnates led by Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, forced Gaveston into exile in 1308. By 1309, however, Edward had reconciled himself with the opposition, and Gaveston was allowed to return.

    Arundel joined the opposition at an early point, and did not attend the Stamford parliament in July 1309, where Gaveston's return was negotiated. After Gaveston returned, his behaviour became even more offensive, and opposition towards him grew. In addition to this, there was great discontent with Edward II's failure to follow up his father's Scottish campaigns. On 16 March 1310, the king had to agree to the appointment of a committee known as the Lords Ordainers, who were to be in charge of the reform of the royal government. Arundel was one of eight earls among the twenty-one Ordainers.

    The Ordainers once more sent Gaveston into exile in 1311, but by 1312 he was back. Now the king's favourite was officially an outlaw, and Arundel was among the earls who swore to hunt him down. The leader of the opposition – after Lincoln's death the year before – was now Thomas, Earl of Lancaster. In June 1312 Gaveston was captured, tried before Lancaster, Arundel and the earls of Warwick and Hereford, and executed. A reconciliation was achieved between the king and the offending magnates, and Arundel and the others received pardons, but animosity prevailed. In 1314 Arundel was among the magnates who refused to assist Edward in a campaign against the Scottish, resulting in the disastrous English defeat at the Battle of Bannockburn.

    Return to loyalty
    Around the time of Bannockburn, however, Arundel's loyalty began to shift back towards the king. Edward's rapprochement towards the earl had in fact started earlier, when on 2 November 1313, the king pardoned Arundel's royal debts. The most significant factor in this process though, was the marriage alliance between Arundel and the king's new favourites, the Despensers. Hugh Despenser the Younger and his father Hugh Despenser the elder were gradually taking over control of the government, and using their power to enrich themselves. While this alienated most of the nobility, Arundel's situation was different. At some point in 1314–1315, his son Richard was betrothed to Isabel, daughter of Hugh Despenser the Younger. Now that he found himself back in royal favour, Arundel started receiving rewards in the form of official appointments. In 1317 he was appointed Warden of the Marches of Scotland, and in August 1318, he helped negotiate the Treaty of Leake, which temporarily reconciled the king with Thomas of Lancaster.

    With Arundel's change of allegiance came a conflict of interest. In August 1321, a demand was made to the king that Hugh Despenser and his father, Hugh Despenser the elder, be sent into exile. The king, facing a rebellion in the Welsh Marches, had no choice but to assent. Arundel voted for the expulsion, but later he claimed that he did so under compulsion, and also supported their recall in December. Arundel had suffered personally from the rebellion, when Roger Mortimer seized his castle of Clun. Early in 1322, Arundel joined King Edward in a campaign against the Mortimer family. The opposition soon crumbled, and the king decided to move against Thomas of Lancaster, who had been supporting the marcher rebellion all along. Lancaster was defeated at the Battle of Boroughbridge in March, and executed.

    In the aftermath of the rebellion, the Despensers enriched themselves on the forfeited estates of the rebels, and Hugh Despenser the elder was created Earl of Winchester in May 1322. Also Arundel, who was now one of the king's principal supporters, was richly rewarded. After the capture of Roger Mortimer in 1322, he received the forfeited Mortimer lordship of Chirk in Wales. He was also trusted with important offices: he became Chief Justiciar of North and South Wales in 1323, and in 1325 he was made Warden of the Welsh Marches, responsible for the array in Wales. He also extended his influence through marriage alliances; in 1325 he secured marriages between two of his daughters and the sons and heirs of two of Lancaster's main allies: the deceased earls of Hereford and Warwick.

    Final years and death
    In 1323, Roger Mortimer, who had been held in captivity in the Tower of London, escaped and fled to France. Two years later, Queen Isabella travelled to Paris on an embassy to the French king. Here, Isabella and Mortimer developed a plan to invade England and replace Edward II on the throne with his son, the young Prince Edward, who was in the company of Isabella. Isabella and Mortimer landed in England on 24 September 1326, and due to the virulent resentment against the Despenser regime, few came to the king's aid. Arundel initially escaped the invading force in the company of the king, but was later dispatched to his estates in Shropshire to gather troops. At Shrewsbury he was captured by his old enemy John Charlton of Powys, and brought to Queen Isabella at Hereford. On 17 November – the day after Edward II had been taken captive – Arundel was executed, allegedly on the instigation of Mortimer. According to a chronicle account, the use of a blunt sword was ordered, and the executioner needed 22 strokes to sever the earl's head from his body.

    Arundel's body was initially interred at the Franciscan church in Hereford. It had been his wish, however, to be buried at the family's traditional resting place of Haughmond Abbey in Shropshire, and this is where he was finally buried. Though he was never canonised, a cult emerged around the late earl in the 1390s, associating him with the 9th-century martyr king St Edmund. This veneration may have been inspired by a similar cult around his grandson, Richard FitzAlan, 11th Earl of Arundel, who was executed by Richard II in 1397.
    Arundel was attainted at his execution; his estates were forfeited to the crown, and large parts of these were appropriated by Isabella and Mortimer. The castle and honour of Arundel was briefly held by Edward II's half-brother Edmund, Earl of Kent, who was executed on 3 September 1330. Edmund FitzAlan's son, Richard, failed in an attempted rebellion against the crown in June 1330, and had to flee to France. In October the same year, the guardianship of Isabella and Mortimer was supplanted by the personal rule of King Edward III. This allowed Richard to return and reclaim his inheritance, and on 8 February 1331, he was fully restored to his father's lands, and created Earl of Arundel.1
  • Birth*: Edmund Fitz Alan 9th Earl of Arundel was born on 1 May 1285 in Marlborough Castle, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.1,4
  • Marriage*: He married Alice de Warenne circa 1305 in England.4
  • Death*: Edmund Fitz Alan 9th Earl of Arundel died on 17 November 1326 in executed, Hereford, England, at age 41.1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 17 November 1326 in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.1

Family: Alice de Warenne b. c 1275, d. b 23 May 1338

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_FitzAlan,_9th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p358.htm#i3574
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_FitzAlan,_8th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p356.htm#i3560

Alice (?) of Saluzzo1

F, #9705, b. circa 1260, d. 25 September 1292

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Richard Fitz Alan 8th Earl of Arundel b. 3 Feb 1266, d. 9 Mar 1301

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_of_Saluzzo,_Countess_of_Arundel.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_FitzAlan,_8th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p358.htm#i3574

Alice de Warenne1

F, #9706, b. circa 1275, d. before 23 May 1338

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Edmund Fitz Alan 9th Earl of Arundel b. 1 May 1285, d. 17 Nov 1326

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p357.htm#i3561
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p356.htm#i3560

Richard Fitz Alan 8th Earl of Arundel1,2

M, #9707, b. 3 February 1266, d. 9 March 1301

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard Fitz Alan 8th Earl of Arundel was born on 3 February 1266 in England.1
  • Marriage*: He married Alice (?) of Saluzzo before 1285.1,2
  • Death*: Richard Fitz Alan 8th Earl of Arundel died on 9 March 1301 in England at age 35.1,2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 9 March 1301 in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.1
  • Biography*: Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel (7th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) (3 February 1266/7 – 9 March 1301/2) was an English Norman medieval nobleman.

    Lineage
    He was the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (6th Earl of Arundel per Ancestral Roots) and Isabella Mortimer, daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore and Maud de Braose. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, 6th Earl of Arundel and Maud le Botiller.

    Richard was feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches. After attaining his majority in 1289 he became the 8th Earl of Arundel, by being summoned to Parliament by a writ directed to the Earl of Arundel.

    He was knighted by King Edward I of England in 1289.

    Fought in Wales, Gascony & Scotland
    He fought in the Welsh wars, 1288 to 1294, when the Welsh castle of Castell y Bere (near modern-day Towyn) was besieged by Madog ap Llywelyn. He commanded the force sent to relieve the siege and he also took part in many other campaigns in Wales ; also in Gascony 1295-97; and furthermore in the Scottish wars, 1298-1300.

    Marriage & Issue
    He married sometime before 1285, Alice of Saluzzo (also known as Alesia di Saluzzo), daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo in Italy. Their issue:
    Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.
    John, a priest.
    Alice FitzAlan, married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave.
    Margaret FitzAlan, married William le Botiller (or Butler).
    Eleanor FitzAlan, married Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy.

    Burial
    Richard and his mother are buried together in the sanctuary of Haughmond Abbey, long closely associated with the FitzAlan family.1

Family: Alice (?) of Saluzzo b. c 1260, d. 25 Sep 1292

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_FitzAlan,_8th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p358.htm#i3574
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_FitzAlan,_7th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11649.htm#i116483
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2354.htm#i23536
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_Mortimer,_lady_of_Clun_and_Oswestry.

John Fitz Alan 7th Earl of Arundel1,2

M, #9708, b. 14 September 1246, d. 18 March 1272

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John Fitz Alan 7th Earl of Arundel was born on 14 September 1246 in Shropshire, England.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Isabel de Mortimer circa 1265 in England.5,6
  • Death*: John Fitz Alan 7th Earl of Arundel died on 18 March 1272 in England at age 25.1,2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 18 March 1272 in Haughmond Abbey, Shropshire, England.2
  • Biography*: John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel (14 September 1246 – 18 March 1272) was an English nobleman. He was also feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches.

    Family
    He was the son of John FitzAlan, 6th Earl of Arundel (d. 1267), and Maud de Verdun, daughter of Theobald le Botiller (or Boteler) and Rohese (or Rohesia) de Verdun. His paternal grandparents were John Fitzalan, Lord of Oswestry and Isabel d'Aubigny.

    Marriage
    Lord Arundel married Isabella Mortimer (died 1292), daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose in 1260. They had a son Richard FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel.1

Family: Isabel de Mortimer b. a 1247, d. b 1 Apr 1292

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_FitzAlan,_7th_Earl_of_Arundel.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11649.htm#i116483
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Fitzalan,_3rd_Lord_of_Oswestry.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2498.htm#i24979
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2354.htm#i23536
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_Mortimer,_lady_of_Clun_and_Oswestry.

Isabel de Mortimer1,2

F, #9709, b. after 1247, d. before 1 April 1292

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Isabel de Mortimer was born after 1247 in England.1,2
  • Marriage*: She married John Fitz Alan 7th Earl of Arundel, son of John Fitz Alan 3rd Lord of Oswestry and Isabel d'Aubigny, circa 1265 in England.1,2
  • Death*: Isabel de Mortimer died before 1 April 1292 in England.1,2
  • Biography*: Isabella Mortimer, Lady of Clun and Oswestry (born after 1247; died before 1 April 1292) was a noblewoman and a member of an important and powerful Welsh Marcher family. Although often overshadowed in modern historiography by her better-known parents, she is now known to have played an important part in her family's struggles against Llywelyn ap Gruffudd and to have helped to secure the frontline at Shropshire in the run-up to English conquest of Wales. She was the wife and widow of John III FitzAlan, baron of Clun and Oswestry and de jure earl of Arundel. After a lengthy widowhood, she married for a second time and largely disappeared from the records.

    Family
    Isabella was born some time after 1247, possibly at Wigmore Castle, Herefordshire, the daughter of Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and Maud de Braose. Her father was a celebrated soldier and Marcher baron; and her mother was a staunch royalist during the Second Barons' War who devised the plan for the escape of Prince Edward, the future King Edward I of England, from the custody of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. She had one sister and five brothers, including Ralph, would-be heir to the family estates, who predeceased his parents, and Edmund Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer.

    Marriages and issue
    Before 14 May 1260, Isabella married her first husband, John III FitzAlan, the son and heir of John II FitzAlan, baron of Clun and Oswestry and de jure earl of Arundel, and Maud de Verdun. In due course John the younger would succeed to the baronies of Clun and Oswestry, but as long as the dowager countess of Arundel remained alive the FitzAlans did not possess the complete earldom or its title. Consequently, Isabella Mortimer never held the title of countess of Arundel, which remained until 1282 with Isabella de Warenne, the childless widow of Hugh d'Aubigny (d.1243).

    Together Isabella Mortimer and John III FitzAlan had at least two children:
    Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel (3 February 1267- 9 March 1302), married Alice of Saluzzo, by whom he had issue.
    Maud Fitzalan (died after October 1298), married Sir Philip Burnell of Condover, Holgate, Acton Burnell, and Little Rissington, by whom she had issue.

    Isabella's husband died, aged around 25, in the spring of 1272, leaving underage children. The couple's son Richard FitzAlan was a boy of about five at the time of his father's death and was committed to the wardship of his maternal grandfather, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore. Serious errors in our nineteenth-century sources have led to the enduring misconception that Isabella Mortimer married Ralph d' Ardern soon after the death of John FitzAlan and had three husbands in all. In fact, she remained a widow for over twelve years and was a prominent and active contributor to Marcher society during that time.

    On 2 September 1285, in a private ceremony at Poling, Sussex, she married, as his second wife, Robert de Hastang. She was initially heavily penalized for having married without royal licence, before it was discovered that her late father had purchased her marriage rights many years earlier from King Henry III, and that she and her new husband had absolved themselves of any wrongdoing under the terms of this agreement, by paying a fine to the executors of father's will. She does not appear to have had any children from her second marriage.

    Widowhood and the Welsh Frontier
    It was during her protracted widowhood that Isabella Mortimer's contributions to Marcher society and Anglo-Welsh relations became clear. With dower and other rights, including royal appointments, in several border strongholds, she developed something of a working partnership alongside her father. Together they were responsible for the security of much of the frontier from the lower edge of Cheshire to southern Herefordshire. Among other things, Isabella was charged with victualing Oswestry Castle for the incoming garrison at the start of the Anglo-Welsh war of 1282 and, several years earlier, with overseeing much needed repairs to the same castle.

    In late 1282, as a second war with Llywelyn ap Gruffudd got under way, Isabella was replaced by her younger brother Edmund in most of her custodial interests, including the frontier fortresses. Although their father was as yet still alive, Edmund was now emerging as the new head of the Mortimer family of Wigmore and the natural leader of the family's war effort.
    Isabella died before 1 April 1292, on which date her husband was released by the Crown from paying outstanding sums relating to her own economic activities.2

Family: John Fitz Alan 7th Earl of Arundel b. 14 Sep 1246, d. 18 Mar 1272

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2354.htm#i23536
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_Mortimer,_lady_of_Clun_and_Oswestry.

John Fitz Alan 3rd Lord of Oswestry1

M, #9710, b. circa 1200, d. before 1267

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John Fitz Alan 3rd Lord of Oswestry was born circa 1200 in Shropshire, England.1,5
  • Marriage*: He married Isabel d'Aubigny circa 1245 in England.6
  • Death*: John Fitz Alan 3rd Lord of Oswestry died before 1267 in Shropshire, England.1,5
  • Biography*: John FitzAlan, 3rd Lord of Clun and Oswestry (1200–1240) in the Welsh Marches in the county of Shropshire.

    Family
    John succeeded his brother, William Fitz Alan, 2nd Lord of Oswestry and Clun, who died in 1216 without issue. They were sons of William Fitz Alan, 1st Lord of Oswestry and Clun (d. c1210) and the daughter of Hugh de Lacy, name unknown; The FitzAlans were descendants of Alan fitzFlaad, a Breton.

    Royal conflicts
    He was one of the feudal barons who became a target for the anger of King John of England, whose forces attacked Oswestry town and burned it in 1216. John FitzAlan was close to Llywelyn ap Iorwerth until 1217.

    He was also a representative of the Crown in a dispute between King Henry III of England and the Welsh leader, Llywelyn the Great in 1226. In the same year he mediated between a neighbour, William Pantulf, Lord of Wem in Shropshire and Madog ap Gruffydd (died 1236), Lord of Powys and a cousin to Llywelyn ap Iorwerth.

    In 1233/4 during the conflict between King Henry III, the Earl Marshal, and Llywelyn the Great, John FitzAlan sided firmly with the Crown and Oswestry was again attacked, this time by Welsh forces.

    Marriage
    He married Isabel d'Aubigny, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel of Chester, and they were parents of:
    John FitzAlan, Lord of Clun & Oswestry, who inherited jure matris, in 1243, the castle and honour of Arundel and became de jure Earl of Arundel.1

Family: Isabel d'Aubigny b. b 1221

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Fitzalan,_3rd_Lord_of_Oswestry.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_1st_Lord_of_Oswestry_and_Clun.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5106
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2498.htm#i24973
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116477
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2498.htm#i24979

Isabel d'Aubigny1

F, #9711, b. before 1221

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: John Fitz Alan 3rd Lord of Oswestry b. c 1200, d. b 1267

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2498.htm#i24979

William Fitz Alan 1st Lord of Oswestry & Clun1,2

M, #9712, b. circa 1150, d. 1210

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Fitz Alan 1st Lord of Oswestry & Clun was born circa 1150 in England.1
  • Death*: He died in 1210 in England.1,2
  • Biography*: William FitzAlan (d. 1210) was a Norman nobleman who lived in Oswestry and Clun, near Shrewsbury, along the medieval Welsh Marches. William was the son of William FitzAlan and Christiana (stepmother was Isabella de Say). His father's second wife brought the lordship of Clun into the family.

    He was the first FitzAlan to hold both the castles of Clun and Oswestry in his own right, and was responsible for the significant expansion of Clun Castle. William was still in his minority in 1160, and Guy Lestrange was appointed as his guardian. William later had two sons, the first also called William FitzAlan and a younger son, John by the daughter of Hugh de Lacy, whose name is not mentioned in any documents. Upon William's death in 1210, the eldest son succeded his father.1

Family: Isabel de Say b. c 1132, d. a 1199

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_1st_Lord_of_Oswestry_and_Clun.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5106
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_Lord_of_Oswestry.

Isabel de Say1

F, #9713, b. circa 1132, d. after 1199

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Isabel de Say was born circa 1132 in England.1
  • Death*: She died after 1199 in England.1
  • Biography*: Isabella de Say (c.1132-1199) was an Anglo-Norman heiress. Isabella was the only surviving child of Helias de Say upon his death in 1165; Helias was the third lord of Clun, a powerful Norman stronghold in Shropshire, England, along the Welsh border. She was also a niece of the influential Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester. She is notable for helping to create the powerful medieval house of the Fitz Allans. Isabella married William Fitz Alan, the lord of nearby Oswestry, as his second wife. William died in 1160, leaving a son by his first wife, Christiana, William Fitz Alan II. Isabella passed Clun Castle to him. The combined lordship of Oswestry and Clun was a significant power in the borderlands with Wales.

    Isabella had married Geoffrey de Vere II, brother of the earl of Oxford by early 1166. After de Vere's death in 1170 she married William Boterel, probably by 1175, the year her stepson William reached his majority. She was certainly married to him by 1188. Isabella's death date is disputed, but she probably lived to 1199.

    A charter of Isabella's to Wenlock Priory in Shropshire, purportedly issued on her deathbed, granted the church and chapels of Clun to that monastery. Her grant was confirmed by her third husband William Boterel.1
  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2498.htm#i24973

William Fitz Alan Lord of Oswestry1

M, #9714, b. 1105, d. 1160

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Fitz Alan Lord of Oswestry was born in 1105 in England.1
  • Death*: He died in 1160 in England.1
  • Biography*: William FitzAlan (1105–1160) was a nobleman of Breton ancestry. He was a major landowner, a Marcher lord with large holdings in Shropshire, where he was the Lord of Oswestry, as well as in Norfolk and Sussex. He took the side of Empress Matilda during the Anarchy and underwent considerable hardship in the Angevin cause before regaining his lands and former status. William's younger brother, Walter fitz Alan (d. 1177), became ancestor of the royal House of Stuart.

    Background and early life
    William was born around 1105. He was the eldest son and heir of Alan fitz Flaad, a Breton noble whose family were closely associated with the sacred environs of Dol-de-Bretagne, close to the border with Normandy and a short distance south-west of the great abbey of Mont Saint-Michel. Alan was a close ally of Henry I of England (1100-1135), who was determined to insert reliable supporters into strategically key areas after the disloyalty of Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, who had a strong support network in the Marches. Alan received extensive fiefs in Shropshire and Norfolk from around the beginning of Henry's reign and more as he proved his worth. Much of the Shropshire land was taken from the holdings of Rainald de Bailleul, ancestor of the House of Balliol, as was land around Peppering, near Arundel in Sussex.

    William's mother was Avelina de Hesdin. Her father was Ernulf de Hesdin (also transcribed as Arnulf), a crusader baron from Hesdin in Artois, which was a fief of the County of Flanders and only loosely attached to France. Ernulf built up large holdings in Staffordshire and Gloucestershire. After his death in the First Crusade, Aveline's brother, also called Ernulf, inherited his lands and titles.

    Baron and rebel
    William succeeded his father around 1114, probably still aged under 10. He was appointed the High Sheriff of Shropshire by Adeliza of Louvain, the second wife of Henry I. His first notable appearance is as a witness to King Stephen's charter to Shrewsbury Abbey in 1136.

    As Sheriff of the county, William was also castellan of Shrewsbury Castle. In 1138, he joined in the revolt against Stephen and garrisoned the castle against the king. After resisting the attacks of the royal army for a month, he fled with his family in August 1138, leaving the castle to be defended by his uncle, Ernulf de Hesdin. When the town fell, Stephen acted in anger, hanging Ernulf and 93 others immediately, frightening the local people and magnates into transferring their allegiance to him.

    William was deprived of his lands and titles and spent the next fifteen years in exile, until the accession of Henry II to power in place of Stephen in 1153-4. He was a close supporter of the Angevin cause, accompanying the Empress or her son on numerous occasions. He was present with Empress Matilda at Oxford in the summer of 1141, and shortly after at the siege of Winchester Castle. He remained in attendance on her at Devizes, witnessing the charter addressed to himself by which she grants Aston to Shrewsbury Abbey. In June 1153 he was present with Henry FitzEmpress, then Duke of Normandy, at Leicester. It was during this period that his younger brother, Walter, used the family's royal connections to make a new career in Scotland under David I of Scotland, an uncle of the Empress.

    William's active support did not end with Henry's accession to the throne. In July 1155, when the king marched against Hugh de Mortimer, a turbulent Marcher lord who had been a key supporter of Stephen, and recaptured the castles at Shrewsbury and Bridgnorth, William FitzAlan was the chief beneficiary. At Bridgnorth ‘the king restored his lands’ and William there received the feudal homage of his tenants. Thus he regained his paternal fief. He was also restored as High Sheriff of Shropshire in 1155, holding the post until his death in 1160.

    Benefactor
    It was probably between 1130 and 1138 that FitzAlan made the first recorded grant to Haughmond Abbey: a fishery at Preston Boats on the River Severn, near Shrewsbury. It is possible that there was a hermitage or a small religious community at Haughmond even in his father's time, and a small church from this earlier period has been revealed by excavations on the site, so it is not clear that William was the founder of the abbey. However, it was he who set it on a secure financial basis, with a series of important land grants in Shropshire and Sussex, which were reciprocated by other magnates in the region. Haughmond received lands from the Empress, confirmed by Stephen and Henry II. William continued to make benefactions to it when he returned from exile, including the wealthy portionary church of Wroxeter, declaring his intention to increase the number of priests there too. He also made grants to nearby Lilleshall Abbey, another Augustinian house. Though not the founder of Wombridge Priory, a smaller Augustinian house, he sanctioned its foundation by the Hadley family, his vassals. It was, however, Haughmond that became the FitzAlan shrine, with all heads of the family after William buried there for a century and a half.

    Death and burial
    William died around Easter 1160. He was buried at Shrewsbury Abbey, according to Eyton, noted in the Haughmond Abbey history ("After William FitzAlan (I), who left his body for burial in Shrewsbury Abbey").

    Family and heritage
    William's first wife was Christiana. She was the mother of his heir and other children.
    William's eldest son and heir was also called William FitzAlan.
    Christiana, their daughter married Hugh Pantulf, 4th Baron of Wem, a later High Sheriff of Shropshire.

    His wife Christiana died before William regained his ancestral estates in 1155. Henry II therefore gave him the hand of Isabel de Say. She was the sole heiress of Helias de Say, who held the lordship of Clun and was an early benefactor of Haughmond Abbey. Clun was to pass to the FitzAlans on the death of Helias, but he outlived William, so it passed to his son, the second William. Isabel brought prestige as well as land. She was the niece of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester, an illegitimate son of Henry I, and thus cousin to William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, who was a principal supporter of the Empress.

    The FitzAlans remained important Marcher lords and magnates in central England for several centuries. A strategic marriage with their Sussex neighbours, the d'Aubigny family, brought the FitzAlans the rich and important Earldom of Arundel. This they held from 1243 until 1580. It was as earls of Arundel that William FitzAlan's descendants made their most important mark on the history of England.

    In literature
    The taking of Shrewsbury in 1138 by King Stephen, including the escape of William FitzAlan and the hanging of the supporters who did not escape, was the historical background for the novel One Corpse Too Many by Ellis Peters. Agents of FitzAlan are characters in a few of the later novels in The Cadfael Chronicles.1

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_Lord_of_Oswestry.

Cennétig mac Lorcáin King of Thomond1,2

M, #9715, b. circa 900, d. 951

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Cennétig mac Lorcáin King of Thomond was born circa 900 in Clare, Ireland*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Be Binn ingen Aurchada, daughter of Aurchada (?) King of West Connacht, circa 940 in Ireland*.3
  • Death*: Cennétig mac Lorcáin King of Thomond died in 951 in Ireland*.1,2
  • Biography*: Cennétig mac Lorcáin, King of Tuadmumu, died 951. He was the father of Brian Boru.

    Reign
    Cennétig was king of the Dál gCais, one of the tribes of the Déisi, subject peoples in Munster. Their name was new, first recorded in the 930s, and they had previously been an undistinguished part of the northern Déisi. The kings of Munster at this time came from the Eóganachta, a vast, complex group of kindreds who claimed descent from Eógan Már. The learned men of the Dál gCais provided a new, and "improved", genealogy for their kings, tracing their descent from Eógan Már's brother Cormac Cass.

    The Dál gCais were based in eastern County Clare, part of the region known as Tuadmumu (later Thomond), a name which first appears in 944 in the report of the defeat of Cennétig at Gort Rotacháin by the Eóganachta king Cellachán Caisil.

    Death
    The report of Cennétig's death in 951 calls him "king of Tuadmumu".

    Children
    Cennétig appears to have had many children, perhaps 11 sons, including Brian Boru. His daughter Órlaith was the wife of the High King of Ireland Donnchad Donn. Órlaith was killed in 941, supposedly for adultery with her stepson Óengus.

    Two of his sons—Dub and Finn—are said to have died at Gort Rotacháin in 944, two—Donncuan and Echthighern—died in 950 during the invasion of Munster by Donnchad Donn's successor Congalach Cnogba. Lachtna apparently succeeded his father, but was killed soon after, and followed by his brother Mathgamain. When Mathgamain was killed in 976, Cennétig's last remaining son, Brian, took over leadership of the Dál gCais. He would go on to defeat the Eóganacht and become High King of Ireland. Another son, Marcán, was Abbot of Tuamgraney and later Inis Cealtra until his death in 1003.1

Family: Be Binn ingen Aurchada b. c 925

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18895.htm#i188941
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18895.htm#i188942

Be Binn ingen Aurchada1

F, #9716, b. circa 925

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Cennétig mac Lorcáin King of Thomond b. c 900, d. 951

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18895.htm#i188942

Aurchada (?) King of West Connacht1

M, #9717, b. circa 900, d. 943

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name-Gaelic: Aurchada (?) King of West Connacht was also known in Gaelic as Urchadh mac Murchadh King of Maigh Seóla.3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 900 in West Connacht, Ireland*.1
  • Death*: He died in 943 in Ireland*.3
  • Biography*: Urchadh mac Murchadh (died 943) was King of Maigh Seóla.

    Biography
    Urchadh is one of the earliest attested kings of Uí Briúin Seóla, whose rulers also seem to have exercised some authority over Iar Connacht. His dynasty, the Muintir Murchada, took their name from his father, Murchadh mac Maenach. The Ó Flaithbertaigh family would later claim him as an ancestor.

    Family
    Urchadh had an elder brother called Urumhain or Earca.

    In addition to his son and successor, Donnchadh, he had three known daughters who achieved notable marriages - Bé Binn inion Urchadh; Creassa inion Urchadh; Caineach inion Urchadh.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2016

Murchadh mac Maenach King of Maigh Seóla.1

M, #9718, b. circa 825, d. 891

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Murchadh mac Maenach King of Maigh Seóla. was born circa 825 in Ireland*.1
  • Death*: He died in 891 in Ireland*.1
  • Biography*: Murchadh is one of the earliest attested kings of his region. He is noteworthy as the person who gave his name to the Muintir Murchada, a dynasty whose leading family later took the surname Ó Flaithbertaigh (O'Flaherty). At this point in time, his people lived east of Lough Corrib, their territory centered on Lough Cime (Lough Hackett), Tuam, County Galway. They would be expelled by the O'Connors in the 1050s.

    The genealogies list two sons, Urchadh and Urumhain, with Urchadh listed as having descendants. A Cleirchin mac Murchadh of Uí Briúin Seóla is listed in the Annals of the Four Masters under 908, though he does not appear in any other source. Urchadh later became the grandfather of Brian Boru. Murchadh was also a descendant of Brion macEchach Muigmedoin King of Connacht" who was son of Eochaid Muigh Meadhoin mac Muiredach 122nd High king of Ireland who fathered the UiNeill dynasty and Brion's famous half brother Niall of the Nine Hostages.

    According to the genealogies, Murchard's great-great-great-greatgrandson was Flaithbheartaigh mac Emhin, whose grandson, Muredach Mór Ua Flaithbheartaigh, apparently became the first to bear the surname. Muredach Mór had three sons - Ruaidri of Lough Cime, Donough Aluinn and Aedh. From Ruaidri are the senior lines of the clan (those of Conmaicne Mara (latter known as Connemara), Moycullen and Sliocht Diarmaid.)1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Patrick de Chaworth Baron of Kidwelly1

M, #9719, b. circa 1254, d. circa 1283

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Isabella de Beauchamp b. c 1263, d. c 30 May 1306

  • Last Edited: 25 Nov 2016

Isabella de Beauchamp1

F, #9720, b. circa 1263, d. circa 30 May 1306

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Isabella de Beauchamp was born circa 1263 in Warwickshire, England.1,5
  • Marriage*: She married Patrick de Chaworth Baron of Kidwelly before 1281 in Carmarthenshire, Wales.1,5
  • Death*: Isabella de Beauchamp died circa 30 May 1306 in England.1
  • Biography*: Lady Isabella de Beauchamp, Lady Kidwelly, Baroness Despenser (born c. 1263 - died before 30 May 1306), was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress.

    Family
    Lady Isabella was born in about 1263 in Warwickshire, England. She was the only daughter of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn who appears to have married; two sisters who were nuns at Shouldham are mentioned in her father's will. She had a brother, Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick who married Alice de Toeni, by whom he had seven children. Her paternal grandparents were William de Beauchamp of Elmley Castle and Isabel Maudit, and her maternal grandparents were Sir John FitzGeoffrey, Lord of Shere, and Isabel Bigod.

    Marriages and issue
    Sometime before 1281, she married firstly Sir Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Kidwelly in Carmarthenshire, South Wales. The marriage produced one daughter:
    Maud Chaworth (2 February 1282- 1322), married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.

    Following Sir Patrick's death in 1286, Lady Isabella had in her possession four manors in Wiltshire and two manors in Berkshire, assigned to her until her dowry should be set forth along with the livery of Chedworth in Gloucestershire and the Hampshire manor of Hartley Mauditt which had been granted to her and Sir Patrick in frankmarriage by her father.
    That same year 1286, she married secondly Sir Hugh le Despenser without the King's licence for which Sir Hugh had to pay a fine of 2000 marks. He was created Baron Despenser by writ of summons to Parliament in 1295, thereby making Lady Isabella Baroness Despenser.

    Together Lord and Lady Despenser had four children:
    Hugh le Depenser, Lord Despenser the Younger (1286- executed 24 November 1326), married Eleanor de Clare, by whom he had issue.
    Aline le Despenser (died before 28 November 1353), married Edward Burnell, Lord Burnell
    Isabella le Despenser (died 4/5 December 1334), married firstly as his second wife, John Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings, by whom she had three children. Their descendants became the Lords Hastings; she married secondly as his second wife, Sir Ralph de Monthermer, 1st Baron Monthermer
    Phillip le Despenser (died 1313), married as his first wife Margaret de Goushill, by whom he had issue.

    Lady Despenser died sometime before 30 May 1306. Twenty years later, her husband and eldest son, favourites of King Edward II, were both executed by the orders of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and Queen Isabella. The couple were by that time the de facto rulers of England, and along with most of the people in the kingdom, they had resented the power both Despensers wielded over the King.

    As her husband had been made Earl of Winchester in 1322, Lady Despenser was never styled as the Countess of Winchester.5

Family: Patrick de Chaworth Baron of Kidwelly b. c 1254, d. c 1283

  • Last Edited: 25 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p356.htm
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Beauchamp,_9th_Earl_of_Warwick.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2648.htm#i26478
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p24461.htm#i244610
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella_de_Beauchamp