Judith von Luxemberg1

F, #9391, b. 1040

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Walram I 'Udo' (?) Count of Limburg b. 1040, d. 1081

  • Last Edited: 9 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p60445.htm#i604442

Walram (?) Count of Arlon1

M, #9392, b. circa 1010

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p60444.htm#i604438
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p60444.htm#i604439

Adele de Haute-Lorraine1

F, #9393, b. circa 1010

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 9 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p60444.htm#i604439

Floris IV (?) Count of Holland & Zealand1

M, #9394, b. 24 June 1210, d. 19 July 1234

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Floris IV (?) Count of Holland & Zealand was born on 24 June 1210 in Holland*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Mathilde van Brabant before 6 February 1224.4
  • Death*: Floris IV (?) Count of Holland & Zealand died on 19 July 1234 in Corbie, France*, at age 24.1

Family: Mathilde van Brabant b. 1205, d. 21 Dec 1267

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p365.htm#i3647
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p795.htm#i7950
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p59438.htm#i594378
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p365.htm#i3648

Mathilde van Brabant1

F, #9395, b. 1205, d. 21 December 1267

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Floris IV (?) Count of Holland & Zealand b. 24 Jun 1210, d. 19 Jul 1234

  • Last Edited: 15 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p365.htm#i3648

William I (?) Count of Holland & Zealand

M, #9396, b. 1168, d. 4 February 1222

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: William I (?) Count of Holland & Zealand was also known as Willem I (?) Graaf van Hollant en Zeeland, Comte de Hollande.3
  • Birth*: He was born in 1168 in Holland*.3
  • Marriage*: He married Aleida van Gelre in 1197 in Stavoren, The Netherlands*.4
  • Death*: William I (?) Count of Holland & Zealand died on 4 February 1222.3

Family: Aleida van Gelre b. 1187, d. 12 Feb 1218

  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10778.htm#i107771
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10777.htm#i107770
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p795.htm#i7950
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p59438.htm#i594378

Aleida van Gelre1

F, #9397, b. 1187, d. 12 February 1218

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William I (?) Count of Holland & Zealand b. 1168, d. 4 Feb 1222

  • Last Edited: 15 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p59438.htm#i594378

Floris III (?) Count of Holland1

M, #9398, b. 1140, d. 1 August 1190

Floris III of Holland
Count of Holland

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Floris III (?) Count of Holland was born in 1140 in Holland*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Ada of Huntingdon, daughter of Henry (?) Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, on 28 August 1162.4
  • Death*: Floris III (?) Count of Holland died on 1 August 1190 in Antioch, Turkey*.1,5
  • Biography*: Floris III of Holland (1141 – August 1, 1190), Count of Holland from 1157 to 1190. He was a son of Dirk VI and Sophia of Rheineck, heiress of Bentheim.

    Life
    On September 28, 1162, he married Ada, sister of King William I of Scotland, also known as William the Lion. The county of Holland adopted from him the rampant lion in the coat of arms and the name of William.

    Floris III was a loyal vassal to Frederick I Barbarossa. He accompanied the emperor on two expeditions to Italy in 1158 and 1176–1178. Frederick thanked him by making Floris part of the imperial nobility.

    The emperor gave Floris the toll right of Geervliet, the most important toll station in Holland at that time. This was actually the legalisation of an existing situation, because the counts of Holland had charged tolls illegally since the start of the 11th century.

    Many farmers came to Holland to turn the swamps into agricultural lands. Dikes and dams were built and the border between Holland and the bishopric of Utrecht had to be determined. There was a dispute between Floris and the bishop of Utrecht about a new dam in the Rhine at Zwammerdam in 1165, which had to be settled by emperor Frederick. The brother of Floris, Baldwin became bishop of Utrecht in 1178.

    War broke out between Flanders and Holland. Count Philip of Flanders wanted to have Zeeland back. Floris was captured in Brugge and had to accept Flemish overlordship in Zeeland as ransom in 1167.

    During his reign Floris III had troubles with West Friesland and a war with Philip count of Flanders concerning their respective rights in West Zeeland, in which he was beaten. In 1170 a great flood caused immense devastation in the north and helped to form the Zuider Zee.

    In 1189 Floris accompanied Frederick Barbarossa upon the third Crusade, of which he was a distinguished leader. He died in 1190 at Antioch of pestilence and was buried there.

    Two sons of Floris III became Count of Holland: Dirk VII in 1190 and William I in 1203.

    Family and children
    He married 28 August 1162 Ada of Huntingdon, daughter of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne.[1] Their children were:
    Ada of Holland (died after 1205), married 1176 Margrave Otto I of Brandenburg.
    Margaret (died after 1203), married 1182 Count Dietrich IV of Cleves.
    Dirk VII, Count of Holland.
    William I, Count of Holland.
    Floris (died 1210), bishop of Glasgow.
    Baldwin (died 1204).
    Robert
    Beatrix
    Elisabeth
    Hedwig
    Agnes (died 1228), Abbess at Rijnsburg.5

Family: Ada of Huntingdon b. bt 1140 - 1146, d. 11 Jan 1208

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10778.htm#i107771
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15048.htm#i150479
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p22868.htm#i228678
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10777.htm#i107770
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_III,_Count_of_Holland.

Ada of Huntingdon1

F, #9399, b. between 1140 and 1146, d. 11 January 1208

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ada of Huntingdon was born between 1140 and 1146 in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, England.1
  • Marriage*: She married Floris III (?) Count of Holland, son of Dirk VI (?) Count of Holland and Petronella d'Alsace-Lorraine, on 28 August 1162.1
  • Death*: Ada of Huntingdon died on 11 January 1208.1
  • Biography*: Ada of Huntingdon (c.?1146 – after 1206) was a Scottish noblewoman and Countess of Holland by marriage.

    Ada was born in Scotland, the daughter of Henry of Huntingdon (1114–1152) and Ada de Warenne (died c.?1178). Henry was the son of King David I of Scotland and Maud, Countess of Huntingdon, and Ada's siblings include the Scottish kings Malcolm IV, William the Lion, and David I.

    Marriage
    In 1162 she was asked for her hand in marriage to Floris III, Count of Holland (c.?1132–1190) by the Abbot of Egmond, Holland. Together, the Abbot and Ada traveled back to Holland, where the wedding ceremony occurred, probably in Egmond, on 28 August 1162. Ada received the County of Ross in the Scottish Highlands as a wedding gift.

    Ada was not actively involved in the governance of the County of Holland but was occasionally mentioned in documents. Floris, her husband was a loyal ally of the Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick II, and often went with him into battle. Dutch chronicler Melis Stoke states that she supported her son in the war with William of Cleves during the War of Succession. In addition, Ada is known to have read Latin. Ada died after 1206 and was probably buried in the Abbey of Middelburg, to which she had already made donations of £64.

    Ada and Floris had 8 or 10 children, of whom some died young, including the following issue:
    Ada (died after 1205), married 1176 Margrave Otto I of Brandenburg
    Margaret (died after 1203), married 1182 Count Dietrich IV of Cleves
    Dirk VII, Count of Holland
    William I, Count of Holland
    Floris (died 1210), bishop of Glasgow
    Baldwin (died 1204)
    Robert
    Beatrix
    Elisabeth
    Hedwig
    Agnes (died 1228), Abbess at Rijnsburg.2

Family: Floris III (?) Count of Holland b. 1140, d. 1 Aug 1190

  • Last Edited: 15 Jun 2015

Dirk VI (?) Count of Holland1

M, #9400, b. 1110, d. 5 August 1157

Dirk VI of Holland
Count of Holland

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Dirk VI (?) Count of Holland was born in 1110 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Petronella d'Alsace-Lorraine in 1113.4
  • Death*: Dirk VI (?) Count of Holland died on 5 August 1157.1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 5 August 1157 in Rijnsburg, Germany*.5
  • Biography*: Dirk VI of Holland (c. 1114 – 5 August 1157), also known as Dietrich in German, Thierry in French, and Theodoric in English, was Count of Holland between 1121 and 1157, at first, during his minority, under the regency of his mother Petronilla. He was the son of Count Floris II. After his death he was succeeded by his eldest son Floris III. He married Sofie of Salm, Countess of Rheineck and Bentheim. She was heiress of Bentheim, which she ruled together with her husband and which was inherited by the couple's second son Otto after his parents' death.

    Petronilla's regency
    When his father died in 1122, Dirk was only 7 years old and his mother, Petronilla, governed the county as regent. In 1123 she supported the uprising of her half-brother, Lothair of Süpplingenburg, Duke of Saxony against Emperor Henry V. After Lothair had been elected king of Germany himself in 1125 he returned Leiden and Rijnland to Holland, which had both been awarded to the Bishop of Utrecht in 1064 (Later on during Dirk's reign the wooden fortifications at Leiden would be replaced by a stone castle). Because Petronilla saw little ability or ambition in Dirk as he grew up, she stalled letting go of the regency when he reached adulthood (fifteen years old), until her favourite son Floris could attempt to take over the county.

    Floris the Black
    This Floris, called "the Black" (Dutch: de Zwarte) did possess those qualities which his older brother seemed to lack. He openly revolted against him and was from 1129 to 1131 recognised as Count of Holland by, amongst others, King Lothair and Andreas of Kuyk, Bishop of Utrecht. After March 1131 Dirk again appears as count of Holland alongside him, the brothers apparently having reached an agreement. Only a few months later, however, in August 1131 Floris accepted an offer from the West-Frisians to become lord of their entire territory, which reignited the conflict with his brother. After this the people from Kennemerland joined the revolt as well. A year later, in August 1132 King Lothair intervened and managed to reconcile the brothers. This did not pacify the Frisians however, who continued their revolt, which was nonetheless eventually suppressed. Later that year, on 26 October Floris was ambushed near Utrecht and murdered by Herman and Godfried of Kuyk, leaving Dirk to rule the county on his own. King Lothair punished this act by having Herman and Godfried's castle razed and banishing the two. Floris was buried at Rijnsburg Abbey.


    Imperial affairs
    Count Dirk had supported his relative Lothair of Saxony against Henry V and with his assistance parts of Holland were regained that had been awarded to and occupied by the Bishopric of Utrecht in 1064. Furthermore, with help from King Conrad III and support of the counts of Cleves and Guelders and his brother-in-law Otto II, Count of Rheineck, he was able to get a candidate of his own (Herman of Horne) recognised as bishop of Utrecht.

    Ecclesiastical affairs and pilgrimage
    Dirk and his mother supported the abbeys of Egmond and Rijnsburg, which flourished in this period. The nunnery at Rijnsburg was established by Petronilla in 1133. Two of her granddaughters, Sophie and Hedwig later joined it, one of them as abbess.

    Dirk and Sophie went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1138 and it was on this pilgrimage that their first son Dirk, called Peregrinus ("Pilgrim"), was born, but he died when he was only 12 years old. On the return journey, in 1139, Dirk visited Pope Innocent II and asked for the abbeys of Egmond and Rijnsburg to be placed under direct papal authority and this request was granted. In this way Dirk removed the Bishop of Utrecht's influence over those abbeys. Dirk's mother, Petronilla, died in 1144 and was buried at Rijnsburg.

    In 1155 the Frisians revolted again and plundered the area of Santpoort nearby Haarlem, but they were beaten back by the knights of Haarlem and Osdorp.

    In 1156 Count Dirk VI resolved the protracted conflict between the abbeys of Egmond and Echternach, which had been ongoing ever since the establishment of Egmond in 923 by Count Dirk I. At the time of the establishment the Count had granted Egmond the rights over all the churches in the area, which had previously belonged to Echternach. Repeated attempts were made to regain these lost rights, initially with little result, but in 1063 William I, Bishop of Utrecht, decided to split the rights between the two abbeys. This division was unacceptable to Egmond however, and its abbots pressed the counts for compensation. Finally, in 1156, Dirk VI resolved to give all the rights over the churches to Egmond again, compensating Echternach with the rights over the proceeds of the church in Vlaardingen and lands on the island of Schouwen. Although the abbot of Egmond was a witness at the agreement, it seems he may have attended under pressure, as only a little while later he excommunicated both Count Dirk and his son Floris. This perhaps is the reason that Dirk, unlike his forefathers, was not buried at Egmond, but at Rijnsburg.

    Family
    Count Dirk VI married Sophie of Salm, Countess of Bentheim some time before 1137. She was a daughter of Otto of Salm, Count of Rheineck and Bentheim, son of Hermann of Salm, King of Germany. Dirk and Sophie had (at least) nine children:
    Dirk, known as Pilgrim (Peregrinus), born 1138/1139 – died 1151.
    Floris, born ca. 1140 – died 1 August 1190 at Antioch (succeeded his father as Floris III, Count of Holland, in 1157).
    Otto, born 1140/1145 – died 1208 or after (inherited his mother's county and became Count of Bentheim).
    Baldwin, born ca. 1149 – died 30 April 1196 (firstly, Provost at St Maria in Utrecht; secondly, Bishop of Utrecht from 1178 until his death).
    Dirk, born ca. 1152 – died 28 August 1197 in Pavia (also became Bishop of Utrecht, in 1197, but died the same year).
    Sophie (in 1186 she became abbess of Rijnsburg Abbey, established by her grandmother).
    Hedwig, died 28 August 1167 (a nun at Rijnsburg).
    Gertrud (died in infancy).
    Petronilla.

    Also, it was alleged that Count Dirk had fathered an illegitimate son, whose name was Robert.5

Family: Petronella d'Alsace-Lorraine b. 1086, d. 24 May 1144

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15048.htm#i150479
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15048.htm#i150480
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p33275.htm#i332749
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p22868.htm#i228678
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirk_VI,_Count_of_Holland.

Petronella d'Alsace-Lorraine1

F, #9401, b. 1086, d. 24 May 1144

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Dirk VI (?) Count of Holland b. 1110, d. 5 Aug 1157

  • Last Edited: 17 Jun 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p22868.htm#i228678

Floris II 'de vette' (?) Count of Holland1

M, #9402, b. before 1080, d. 2 March 1121

Floris II, Count of Holland

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Floris II 'de vette' (?) Count of Holland was born before 1080 in Holland, The Netherlands*.1
  • Death*: He died on 2 March 1121.1
  • Biography*: Floris II, Count of Holland (or Floris the Fat) (born ca. 1085 in Vlaardingen, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands; reigned 1091 – March 2, 1121) was the first from the native dynasty of Holland to be called Count of Holland.

    He was the son of his predecessor Dirk V and Othilde. Floris II ended the conflict with the Bishop of Utrecht (which he inherited from his father, and should be seen in light of the power struggle between the Pope and the Holy Roman Emperor), most likely by becoming his vassal. In 1101 he was endowed with the title of Count of Holland by the bishop of Utrecht, after acquiring Rhineland (Leiden and surroundings) ('comes de Hollant', up until that time the counts' dominion had been officially referred to as Frisia).
    Around 1108, Floris II married Gertrude, the daughter of Theodoric II, Duke of Lorraine. Gertrude changed her name to Petronila (which is derived from Peter), in recognition of her loyalty to the Holy See. Petronila and Floris II had four children, three boys and one girl: Dirk, Floris, Simon and Hedwig, respectively. Dirk became his successor, Dirk VI of Holland, while Floris became known as Floris the Black and contested his brother's power.4

Family: Othilde von Sachsen b. c 1065, d. 18 Nov 1120

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15048.htm#i150480
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p33275.htm#i332749
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15049.htm#i150481
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_II,_Count_of_Holland.

Othilde von Sachsen1

F, #9403, b. circa 1065, d. 18 November 1120

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family 1: Dirk V (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland b. 1054, d. 17 Jun 1091

Family 2: Floris II 'de vette' (?) Count of Holland b. b 1080, d. 2 Mar 1121

  • Last Edited: 30 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p33275.htm#i332749
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15049.htm#i150481

Dirk V (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland1

M, #9404, b. 1054, d. 17 June 1091

Dirk V, Count of Holland

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Dirk V (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland was born in 1054 in Vlaardingen, The Netherlands*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Othilde von Sachsen before 1083.1
  • Death*: Dirk V (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland died on 17 June 1091.1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 17 June 1091 in Egmond Abbey, Bergen, North Holland, Holland*.3
  • Biography*: Dirk V (1052 – June 17, 1091) was Count of Holland (which was called Frisia at that time) from 1061 to 1091.

    Dirk V succeeded Floris I, under the guardianship of his mother, Gertrude of Saxony. William I, Bishop of Utrecht, took advantage of the young ruler, occupying territory that he had claimed in Holland. William's claim was confirmed by two charters of the emperor Henry IV. (April 30, 1064 and May 2, 1064). Dirk only retained possession of lands west of the Vlie and around the mouths of the Rhine.

    Gertrude and her son withdrew to the islands of Frisia (Zeeland), leaving William to occupy the disputed lands. In 1063 Gertrude married Robert of Flanders (Robert the Frisian), the second son of Baldwin V of Flanders. Baldwin gave Dirk the Imperial Flanders as an appanage - including the islands of Frisia west of the Frisian Scheldt river. Robert then became his stepson's guardian, gaining control of the islands east of the Scheldt. Robert managed to conquer Kennemerland (north of North Holland), but held it only briefly.

    Robert therefore, in both his own right and that of Dirk, was now the ruler of all Frisia. The death of his brother Baldwin VI in 1070 led to civil war in Flanders. The claim of Robert to the guardianship of his nephew Arnulf III was disputed by Richilde, Countess of Mons and Hainaut, the widow of Baldwin VI. The issue was decided by Robert's victory at Cassel (February 1071), where Arnulf was killed and Richilda taken prisoner.

    The war in Holland and Frisia became part of a large conflict from 1075 onwards. The pope had excommunicated the emperor. The bishop of Utrecht supported the emperor, while the count of Holland supported Pope Gregory VII and anti-king Rudolphe.

    While Robert was thus engaged in Flanders, an effort was made to recover the County of Holland and other lands now held by William of Utrecht. The people rose in revolt, but were brought back under Episcopal rule by an army under the command of Godfrey IV (the Hunchback), duke of Lower Lorraine, by order of the emperor (Henry IV). In 1076, at the request of William, Duke Godfrey visited his domains in the Frisian borderland. At Delft, the duke was murdered by revolutionaries (February 26, 1076). William of Utrecht died on April 17, 1076.

    Dirk V, now managing his own estate, was quick to take advantage of this favorable juncture. With the help of Robert (his stepfather) he raised an army and besieged Conrad of Utrecht, the successor of William, in the castle of Ysselmonde, taking him prisoner. The bishop purchased his liberty by surrendering all claim to the disputed lands.
    Dirk V was succeeded by Floris II upon his death in 1091. He was buried in the Egmond Abbey.3

Family: Othilde von Sachsen b. c 1065, d. 18 Nov 1120

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15049.htm#i150481
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11359.htm#i113584
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirk_V,_Count_of_Holland.

Florent I (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland1

M, #9405, b. circa 1025, d. 18 June 1061

Floris I of Holland
Count in Frisia

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Florent I (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland was also known as Floris I (?) Count of Holland.3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1025 in Vlaardingen, The Netherlands*.4,3
  • Marriage: He married Gertrude (?) of Saxony, daughter of Bernard II (?) Duke of Saxony and Eilika (?) of Schweinfurt, circa 1050.3
  • Death*: Florent I (?) Count of Holland & West Friesland died on 18 June 1061 in Nederhemert, The Netherlands*.1
  • Biography*: Floris I of Holland (born in Vlaardingen – killed June 28, 1061 in Guelders (Gelderland), Netherlands) was Count of Holland, then called Frisia west of the Vlie, from 1049 to 1061. He was a son of Dirk III and Othelindis.

    He succeeded his brother Dirk IV, Count of Holland, who was murdered in 1049. He was involved in a war of a few Lotharingian vassals against the imperial authority. On a retreat from Zaltbommel he was ambushed and killed in battle at Nederhemert (called Hamerth at the time), on 28 June 1061.

    Family and children
    He married ca. 1050 Princess Gertrude of Saxony, daughter of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony and Eilika of Schweinfurt, and had at least three children by her:
    Dirk V (c. 1052, Vlaardingen – 17 June 1091).
    Bertha (c. 1055–1094, Montreuil-sur-Mer), who married Philip I of France in 1072.
    Floris (b. c. 1055), a canon at Liége.

    Gertrude married secondly in 1063 Robert the Frisian, Count of Flanders, who also acted as guardian for the children of her previous marriage and as regent for his stepson until 1071.5

Family 1: Gertrude (?) of Saxony b. c 1030

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 31 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11359.htm#i113584
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Dreux.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_I,_Count_of_Holland.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10310.htm#i103095
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_I,_Count_of_Holland.

Baudouin VI (IX) (?) Count of Hainaut Emperor of Constantinople1

M, #9406, b. July 1172, d. 1205

Baldwin I of Constantinople
Seal of Baldwin I
Latin Emperor of Constantinople

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Baudouin VI (IX) (?) Count of Hainaut Emperor of Constantinople was born in July 1172 in Valenciennes, France.1
  • Marriage*: He married Marie de Blois-Champagne on 13 January 1186.4
  • Death*: Baudouin VI (IX) (?) Count of Hainaut Emperor of Constantinople died in 1205 in while imprisoned, Bulgaria*.1
  • Biography*: Baldwin I (July 1172 – c.?1205), the first emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople, as Baldwin IX Count of Flanders and as Baldwin VI Count of Hainaut, was one of the most prominent leaders of the catastrophic Fourth Crusade, which resulted in the sack of Constantinople and the conquest of large parts of the Byzantine Empire, and the foundation of the Latin Empire, also known as Romània. He lost his final battle to Kaloyan, the emperor of Bulgaria, and spent his last days as his prisoner.

    Early life and family history
    Baldwin was the son of Baldwin V of Hainaut and Margaret I, Countess of Flanders. When the childless Philip of Alsace left on the last of his personal crusades in 1177, he designated his brother-in-law Baldwin V his heir. When Philip returned in 1179 after an unsuccessful siege of Harim during a joint campaign on behalf of the Principality of Antioch, he was designated as the chief adviser of prince Philip II Augustus by his sickly father Louis VII of France. One year later, Philip of Alsace had his protégé married to his niece, Isabelle of Hainaut, offering the County of Artois and other Flemish territories as dowry, much to the dismay of Baldwin V. In 1180, war broke out between Philip II and his mentor, resulting in the devastation of Picardy and Île-de-France; King Philip refused to give open battle and gained the upper hand, and Baldwin V, at first allied with his brother-in-law (Philip of Alsace), intervened on behalf of his son-in-law in 1184, in support of his daughter's interests.

    Count Philip's wife Elisabeth died in 1183, and Philip Augustus seized the province of Vermandois on behalf of Elisabeth's sister, Eleonore. Philip then remarried, to Matilda of Portugal. Philip gave Matilda a dower of a number of major Flemish towns, in an apparent slight to Baldwin V. Fearing that he would be surrounded by the royal domain of France and the County of Hainaut, Count Philip signed a peace treaty with Philip Augustus and Count Baldwin V on 10 March 1186, recognizing the cession of Vermandois to the king, although he was allowed to retain the title Count of Vermandois for the remainder of his life. Philip died without further issue of disease on the Third Crusade at the siege of Acre in 1191, he was succeeded in Flanders by Baldwin V of Hainaut, although the two had been on seemingly uncordial terms since the 1186 treaty. Baldwin V thereupon ruled as Baldwin VIII of Flanders by right of marriage. When Countess Margaret I died in 1194, Flanders descended to her eldest son Baldwin, who ruled as Baldwin IX, Count of Flanders.

    In 1186, the younger Baldwin had married Marie of Champagne, daughter of Count Henry I of Champagne and Countess Marie of France. The chronicler Gislebert describes Baldwin as being infatuated with his young bride, who nevertheless preferred prayer to the marital bed.

    Immediately after this arrangement, the count of Hainaut's son Baldwin, thirteen years old, received as wife Marie, the count of Champagne's sister, twelve years old, at Château-Thierry. This Marie began sufficiently young to devote herself to divine obedience in prayers, vigils, fasts and alms. Her husband Baldwin, a young knight, by chaste living, scorning all other women, began to love her alone with a fervent love, which is rarely found in any man, so that he devoted himself to his sole wife only and was content with her alone. The solemn rejoicing of the wedding was celebrated at Valenciennes with an abundance of knights and ladies and men of whatever status.

    Through Marie, Baldwin had additional connections and obligations to the defenders of the Holy Land: her brother Henry II of Champagne had been King of Jerusalem in the 1190s (leaving a widow and two daughters who needed help to keep and regain their territories in Palestine). Marie's uncles Richard I of England and Philip II of France had just been on the Third Crusade.

    Baldwin's own family had also been involved in the defence of Jerusalem: his uncle Philip had died on Crusade. Baldwin's mother's mother was great-aunt of Isabella, Queen of Jerusalem and the Counts of Flanders had tried to help Jerusalem relatives in their struggle. Baldwin wanted to continue the tradition. Margaret died in 1194, and the younger Baldwin became Count of Flanders. His father died the next year, and he succeeded to Hainaut.

    Count of Flanders and Hainaut
    Baldwin took possession of a much-reduced Flanders, lessened by the large chunk, including Artois, given by Philip of Alsace as dowry to Baldwin's sister Isabelle of Hainaut, and another significant piece to his own wife. Isabelle had died in 1190, but King Philip still retained her dowry, on behalf of Isabelle's son, the future Louis VIII of France. The eight years of Baldwin's rule in Flanders were dominated by his attempts to recover some of this land. After Philip II of France took Baldwin's brother, Philippe of Namur, prisoner, Baldwin was forced to agree to a truce to ensure his safety. The Treaty of Péronne was signed in January 1200 on the condition that Baldwin receive the territories he had won during the war. Baldwin was made the vassal of Philip II, and the king returned portions of Artois to Baldwin.

    In this fight against the French king, Baldwin allied with others who had quarrels with Philip, including kings Richard I and John of England, and the German King Otto IV. A month after the treaty, on 23 February 1200, Baldwin took the cross—that is, he committed to embark on a crusade. He spent the next two years preparing, finally leaving on 14 April 1202.

    As part of his effort to leave his domains in good order, Baldwin issued two notable charters for Hainaut. One detailed an extensive criminal code, and appears to be based on a now-lost charter of his father. The other laid down specific rules for inheritance. These are an important part of the legal tradition in Belgium.

    Baldwin left behind his two-year-old daughter and his pregnant wife, Countess Marie. Marie was regent for Baldwin for the two years she remained in Flanders and Hainaut, but by early 1204, she had left both her children behind to join him in the East. They expected to return in a couple of years, but in the end neither would see their children or their homeland again. In their absence Baldwin's younger brother Philip of Namur was regent in Flanders, with custody of the daughters. Baldwin's uncle William of Thy (an illegitimate son of Baldwin IV of Hainaut) was regent for Hainaut.

    Meanwhile, desperate for funds to support themselves and pay for their expenses, the leaders of the Fourth Crusade were persuaded to diverted to Constantinople in large part due to the exiled Byzantine prince Alexios (future Emperor Alexios IV Angelos) who promised them supplies and money in return for their help in ousting his uncle Emperor Alexios III Angelos, and freeing his father Isaac II Angelus. In April 1204, after numerous negotiations attempting to obtain the promised funds from the Byzantines, the Crusaders conquered the most powerfully protected city in the world. Stunned at their own success and unsure of what to do next, the leaders adopted a similar track as their forefathers had during the First Crusade. They elected one of their own, Count Baldwin of Flanders as Emperor (of what modern historians refer to as the Latin Empire) and divided imperial lands into feudal counties.

    Latin Emperor
    The imperial crown was at first offered to Enrico Dandolo, Doge of Venice, who refused it. The choice then lay between Baldwin and the nominal leader of the crusade, Boniface of Montferrat. While Boniface was considered the most probable choice, due to his connections with the Byzantine court, Baldwin was young, gallant, pious, and virtuous, one of the few who interpreted and observed his crusading vows strictly, and the most popular leader in the host. With Venetian support he was elected on 9 May 1204, and crowned on 16 May in the Hagia Sophia at a ceremony which closely followed Byzantine practices. During his coronation, Baldwin wore a very rich jewel that had been bought by Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Komnenos for 62,000 silver marks. Baldwin's wife Marie, unaware of these events, had sailed to Acre. There she learned of her husband's election as emperor, but died in August 1204 before she could join him.

    The Latin Empire was organized on feudal principles; the emperor was feudal superior of the princes who received portions of the conquered territory. His own special portion consisted of the city of Constantinople, the adjacent regions both on the European and the Asiatic side, along with some outlying districts, and several islands including Lemnos, Lesbos, Chios and Tenos. The territories still had to be conquered; first of all it was necessary to break the resistance of the Greeks in Thrace and secure Thessalonica. In this enterprise in the summer of 1204, Baldwin came into collision with Boniface of Montferrat, the rival candidate for the empire, who received a large territory in Macedonia with the title of King of Thessalonica.

    Boniface hoped to make himself quite independent of the empire, to do no homage for his kingdom, and he opposed Baldwin's proposal to march to Thessalonica. The antagonism between Flemings and Lombards aggravated the quarrel. Baldwin insisted on going to Thessalonica; Boniface laid siege to Adrianople, where Baldwin had established a governor; civil war seemed inevitable. An agreement was effected by the efforts of Dandolo and the count of Blois. Boniface received Thessalonica as a fief from the emperor, and was appointed commander of the forces which were to march to the conquest of Greece.

    During the following winter (1204–1205) the Franks prosecuted conquests in Bithynia, in which Henry, Baldwin's brother, took part. But in February the Greeks revolted in Thrace, relying on the assistance of Kaloyan, tsar of Bulgaria, whose overtures of alliance had been rejected by the emperor. The garrison of Adrianople was expelled. Baldwin along with Dandolo, the count of Blois, and Marshal Villehardouin, the historian, marched to besiege that city. The Frankish knights were defeated (14 April 1205); the count of Blois was slain, and the emperor captured by the Bulgarians (see Battle of Adrianople).

    For some time his fate was uncertain, and in the meanwhile Henry, his brother, assumed the regency. Not until the middle of July the following year was it ascertained that he was dead. The circumstances of Baldwin's death are not exactly known. It seems that he was at first treated well as a valuable hostage, but was sacrificed by the Bulgarian monarch in a sudden outburst of rage, perhaps in consequence of the revolt of Philippopolis, which passed into the hands of the Franks. According to a Bulgarian legend, Baldwin had caused his own downfall by trying to seduce Kaloyan's wife. The historian George Acropolites reports that the Tsar had Baldwin's skull made into a drinking cup, just as had happened to Nicephorus I almost four hundred years before.

    Tsar Kaloyan wrote to Pope Innocent III, reporting that Baldwin had died in prison. A tower of the Tsarevets fortress of the medieval Bulgarian capital, Veliko Tarnovo, is still called Baldwin's Tower; supposedly, it was the tower where he was interned.

    Family
    It was not until July 1206 that the Latins in Constantinople had reliable information that Baldwin was dead. His brother Henry was crowned emperor in August.

    Back in Flanders, however, there seemed to be doubt whether Baldwin was truly dead. In any case, Baldwin's other brother Philip of Namur remained as regent, and eventually both of Baldwin's daughters, Joan and Margaret II, were to rule as countesses of Flanders.

    The false Baldwin
    Twenty years later, in 1225, a man appeared in Flanders claiming to be the presumed dead Baldwin. His claim soon became entangled in a series of rebellions and revolts in Flanders against the rule of Baldwin's daughter Jeanne. A number of people who had known Baldwin before the crusade rejected his claim, but he nonetheless attracted many followers from the ranks of the peasantry. Eventually unmasked as a Burgundian serf named Bertrand of Ray, the false Baldwin was executed in 1226.5

Family: Marie de Blois-Champagne b. 1174, d. 9 Aug 1204

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p365.htm#i3646
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_V,_Count_of_Hainaut.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_I,_Countess_of_Flanders.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p3111.htm#i31101
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_I_of_Constantinople

Marie de Blois-Champagne1

F, #9407, b. 1174, d. 9 August 1204

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Marie de Blois-Champagne was born in 1174 in Champagne, France.1
  • Marriage*: She married Baudouin VI (IX) (?) Count of Hainaut Emperor of Constantinople, son of Baudouin V (VIII) (?) Count of Hainaut, Margrave of Namur and Margaret I (?) Countess of Flanders, on 13 January 1186.1
  • Death*: Marie de Blois-Champagne died on 9 August 1204 in the Holy Land.1,2
  • Biography*: Marie of Champagne (c.?1174 – 9 August 1204) was the Empress consort of Baldwin I of Constantinople.

    Family
    She was a daughter of Henry I, Count of Champagne and Marie of France, Countess of Champagne. Her maternal grandparents were Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine.

    Her brothers were Henry II of Champagne and Theobald III, Count of Champagne. Her sister Scholastique of Champagne married William V of Macon. Both sisters are mentioned by name in the chronicle of Alberic of Trois-Fontaines.

    Marriage
    According to the chronicle of Gislebert of Mons, Marie was bethrothed to "Theobald", son of the count of Flanders and Hainaut in 1179. Gislebert is presumed to have misrecorded the name of Baldwin. Her betrothed was Baldwin VI, son of Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut and Margaret I, Countess of Flanders.

    On 6 January 1186, Marie and Baldwin were married. They had two known children:
    Joan, Countess of Flanders (1199/1200 – 5 December 1244).
    Margaret II, Countess of Flanders (2 June 1202 – 10 February 1280).

    Empress consort
    On 14 April 1202 her husband left Flanders to join the Fourth Crusade. This Crusade was diverted to Constantinople, capital of the Byzantine Empire. The crusaders captured and sacked the city. Then they decided to set up a Latin Empire in place of the fallen Greek one. On 9 May 1204, Baldwin was elected its first emperor making Marie the empress consort.

    Marie herself left Flanders to join her husband but decided to visit Outremer first. According to Geoffrey of Villehardouin she could not join him in the crusade earlier as she was pregnant at the time of his departure. After delivery of the child, Margaret and sufficient recovery, she set forth to join him.

    She set sail from the port of Marseille and landed in Acre. There she received tribute by Bohemond IV of Antioch.[2] In Acre news reached her of the fall of Constantinople and the proclamation of Baldwin as the new emperor. She wanted to set sail for Constantinople but fell sick and died in the Holy Land.

    News of her death reached Constantinople through Crusading reinforcements from Syria. Baldwin was reportedly afflicted by the death of his wife. Villehardouin reports that Marie "was a gracious and virtuous lady and greatly honoured."2







  • Last Edited: 18 Jun 2015

Henry I (?) King of Navarre1

M, #9408, b. circa 1240, d. 22 July 1274

Henry I
King of Navarre
Count of Champagne

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Henry I (?) King of Navarre was also known as Enrique I (III) (?) Rey de Nevarre.2
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1240 in Navarre, Spain*.2
  • Marriage*: He married Blanche d'Artois, daughter of Robert I de France Count of Artois and Matilda (?) of Brabant, in 1269.3
  • Death*: Henry I (?) King of Navarre died on 22 July 1274 in Pamplona, Spain*.2,1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 22 July 1274 in Pamplona Catherdral, Pamplona, Spain*.1
  • Biography*: Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. 1244 – 22 July 1274) was the Count of Champagne and Brie (as Henry III) and King of Navarre from 1270. After a brief reign, characterised, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

    Henry was the youngest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Bourbon. During the reign of his older brother Theobald II he held the regency during many of Theobald's numerous absences and was declared heir by his childless brother, whom he succeeded in December 1270. His proclamation at Pamplona, however, did not take place till March of the following year (1271), and his coronation was delayed until May 1273. His first act was the swear to uphold the Fueros of Navarre and then go to perform homage to Philip III of France for Champagne.

    In 1269 Henry had married Blanche of Artois, daughter of Robert I of Artois and niece of Louis IX of France. He was thus in the "Angevin" circle in international politics. He came to the throne at the height of an economic boom in Navarre that was not happening elsewhere in Spain at as great a rate. But by the Treaty of Paris (1259), the English had been ceded rights in Gascony that effectively cut off Navarrese access to the ocean (since France, Navarre's ally, was at odds with England).

    Henry allowed the Pamplonese burg of Navarrería to disentangle itself from the union of San Cernin and San Nicolás, effected in 1266. He also granted privileges to the towns of Estella, Arcos, and Viana, fostering urban growth. His relations with the nobility were, on the whole, friendly, though he was prepared to maintain the peace of his realm at nearly any cost.

    Henry initially sought to recover territory lost to Castile by assisting the revolt of Philip, brother of Alfonso X of Castile, in 1270, but eventually declined, preferring to establish an alliance with Castile through the marriage of his son Theobald to Violant of Castile, daughter of Alfonso X. This failed with the death of the young Theobald after he fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella in 1273.

    Henry did not long outlive his son. He died with no male heir; the male line of the house of Champagne became extinct. He was thus succeeded by his only legitimate child, a one-year-old daughter named Joan, under the regency of her mother Blanche. Joan's 1284 marriage to Philip the Fair, the future King of France, in the same year united the crown of Navarre to that of France and saw Champagne devolve to the French royal domain.

    In the Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri, a younger contemporary, sees Henry's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory, where he is grouped with a number of other European monarchs of the 13th century. Henry is not named directly, but is referred to as "the kindly-faced" and "the father-in-law of the Pest of France".1

Family: Blanche d'Artois b. 1248, d. 2 May 1302

  • Last Edited: 7 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_of_Navarre
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10686.htm#i106854
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10214.htm#i102137

Blanche d'Artois1

F, #9409, b. 1248, d. 2 May 1302

Blanche of Artois
Queen consort of Navarre

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Blanche d'Artois was also known as Blanche (?) of Artois.4
  • Birth*: She was born in 1248 in Artois, France.4
  • Marriage*: She married Henry I (?) King of Navarre in 1269.1
  • Marriage: Blanche d'Artois married Edward Crouchback (?) 1st Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry III Plantagenet King of England and Eleanor (?) of Provence, in 1276.4
  • Death*: Blanche d'Artois died on 2 May 1302 in Paris, France.1
  • Biography*: Blanche of Artois (Blanche d'Artois) (1248 – 2 May 1302) was the queen consort of Navarre; after her husband Henry I of Navarre's death, she served as regent from 1274 to 1284 on behalf of her daughter, Joan I. Besides Navarre, she ruled the counties of Brie, Champagne, Troyes and Meaux.

    In 1276, she became Countess of Lancaster by marrying into the English royal family.

    She was the daughter of Matilda of Brabant and Robert I, Count of Artois.

    First marriage
    Blanche married Henry I of Navarre who died in 1274. This marriage was politically advantageous for Navarre, Blanche having been the niece of Louis IX of France. Together they had two children:
    Theobald - d. 1270 fell from a battlement at the castle of Estella
    Joan I of Navarre, Queen regnant of Navarre and Queen consort of France

    Second marriage
    After Henry's death, Blanche married Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, in 1276. Edmund was also a widower. Edmund and Blanche had three children:
    Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster
    Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster
    John of Lancaster, seigneur of Beaufort (present day Montmorency, Aube, arrond. d’Arcis-sur-Aube, canton de Chavanges) and Nogent-l’Artaud (Aisne, arrond. de Château-Thierry, canton de Charly). Before July 1312 he married Alix de Joinville.5

Family 1: Henry I (?) King of Navarre b. c 1240, d. 22 Jul 1274

Family 2: Edward Crouchback (?) 1st Earl of Lancaster b. 16 Jan 1245, d. 5 Jun 1296

  • Last Edited: 19 Jun 2015

Daniel Regan1

M, #9410, b. circa 1870

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Mary Matilda MacFarlane b. 29 Jul 1871, d. 27 Feb 1976

  • Last Edited: 12 Jul 2015

Citations

  1. [S611] Alex Gillis, "Alex Gillis to Don MacFarlane," e-mail to Donald James MacFarlane, April 20, 2004, July 11, 2015.
  2. [S835] Maryknoll Mission Archives, online http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/, http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/
  3. [S835] Maryknoll Mission Archives, online http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/, http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/

Bishop William Daniel Regan1

M, #9411, b. 5 April 1904, d. 24 October 1994

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Bishop William Daniel Regan was born on 5 April 1904 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.1
  • Death*: He died on 24 October 1994 in Daveo, Phillipines, at age 90.1
  • Burial*: He was buried on 31 October 1994 in in the vault of Christ the King Cathedral of the Diocese of Tagum, Davao Province, Phillipines.1
  • Biography*: Bishop Joseph W. Regan died at San Pedro hospital in Davao City, Philippines, on October 24 at 2:20 p.m. He was 89 years old, a Maryknoll priest for 65 years and Bishop for 32 years, giving the longest overseas service of any Maryknoller in the history of the Society.

    Joseph William Regan was born April 5, 1905, in Boston, Massachusetts, son of William D. and Mary McFarlane Regan. His sister, two years younger, became Sister Rita Marie Regan, M.M. and served in South China and Taiwan until her retirement in 1994. Their father was a railroad car inspector on the New York-New Haven Railroad. He belonged to the choir in St. James Church in Boston. Their mother served as a catechist in the Cathedral as well as in a neighboring parish.

    Joseph first attended public school for three years and then enrolled in St. Joseph’s Parochial School. He graduated from Fairhaven High School in June 1921 and in June 1925 from Boston College with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He studied at St. Bernard’s Seminary in Rochester, New York, as a priesthood candidate for the Fall River Diocese. He was attracted to Maryknoll through his devotion to St. Teresa the Little Flower, a desire to serve as a missionary to China, and the biography of Theophane Venard, A Modern Martyr, written by Father James A, Walsh, co-founder of the Maryknoll Society. He entered Maryknoll Seminary in Ossining, New York, in September, 1927 and was ordained a priest on January 27, 1929.

    After his ordination Father Regan left for South China where he served a total of 22 years from 1929 through 1951. His first task was to study the Cantonese language; then he was assigned to Wuchow, South China, where he served for about three years. In 1934 he was transferred to the neighboring Kweilin Mission and took up pastoral work among the Mandarin speaking people in Laipo. In 1935 he was given additional duties, serving as Vicar Delegate to Wuchow for the Kweilin area for two five-year terms from 1938 through 1948. He served in the Laipo mission for 16 years in pastoral ministry.

    When Communist forces took over South China, Father Regan was placed under house arrest on December 15, 1950. He was taken to jail on Christmas Day. Two of his six months in jail were spent in solitary confinement. He was expelled from China on June 20, 1951 and returned to the United States.

    While recuperating at Maryknoll headquarters in New York, Father Regan was asked by his superiors to lead a group of Maryknollers to a new mission in the Philippines, where he served for the rest of his life. Appointed Group Superior Dec. 14, 1951, he led the first 11 Maryknoll priests in Lipa Diocese, Laguna Province, near Manila. There he learned the Tagalog language and served for eight years in Pakil and Paete. On October 4, 1956 he was appointed Regional Superior for all Maryknoll Society Members in the Philippines.

    According to Father Regan, the Maryknollers soon found the Laguna mission “too established,” and in April 1958 the Society accepted a new mission in the Davao Province on the Island of Mindanao. Due to postwar migrations of Filipinos, the southern island of Mindanao had experienced a population explosion and priests already were in short supply to serve this rapidly expanding populace.

    Father Regan moved to Davao and learned his fourth language, Cebuano. In 1959 the Congregation of Propaganda Fide in Rome created a Prelature Nullius in the northeastern part of Davao, appointing Father Regan as the Prelate to administer this district.

    On February 2, 1962, Monsignor Regan was appointed Titular Bishop of Isinda (Pamphylia) and Ordinary of the Prelature of Tagum, a vast frontier to the northeast of Davao City. He was consecrated Bishop on April 25, 1962 in Tagum and served as Ordinary until 1980, when he reached the retirement age of 75. As Bishop he established parishes, schools, a hospital, a radio station and a seminary. He stressed the training of local seminarians for the growth of the local Church.

    The Church in Tagum became known in the 1970s and 1980s throughout the Philippines as a cradle of the basic eccesial communities movement. Lay leadership formation, the volunteer catechists movement, social action projects, and youth formation were also hallmarks of the Church in Tagum under the leadership of Bishop Regan.

    The Bishop’s responsibilities also took him outside Tagum. He attended the Second Vatican Council from 1962 to 1965. He participated in the Maryknoll General Chapters of 1946, 1956 and 1972 at the Maryknoll Center in New York. He was an active member of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines. The Jesuit University in Davao City granted him an honorary doctorate in 1979.

    Bishop Regan had many qualities that endeared him to the people he served. He had a quiet sense of humor; he manifested pastoral care and solicitude, particularly by visiting his beloved diocesan clergy and the indigenous sisters. He became affectionately known as “Lolo” or grandfather, and, with advancing age, he was often called “Super Lolo.”

    In the 1980s and 1990s, “retired” Bishop Regan continued as active resident Chaplain of Christ the King Hospital in Tagum which he founded. He filled in for the three succeeding Bishops of Tagum Diocese and the newly formed Mati Diocese. In offering school Masses he encouraged the students in both Catholic and public schools to offer material support for the diocesan seminary and to consider active involvement in the Church. Each Spring he systematically attended the graduation ceremonies of all the Catholic high schools in the diocese, conferring diplomas on thousands of graduating Filipinos.

    On April 28, 1987, there was a great celebration in Tagum and Davao City on the occasion of his 25th anniversary as Bishop. Similar celebrations were held in 1989 and 1994 on his sixtieth and sixty-fifth anniversaries of priesthood. His sister, Sister Rita Marie, M.M. came to be with him on both these happy occasions. She was with him again in his last days and at the time of his death.

    A Mass of Christian Burial was concelebrated on October 31, 1994 in Christ the King Cathedral of the Diocese of Tagum in Davao Province of the Philippines. Bishop Wilfredo Manlapaz, Bishop of Tagum, was the Principal Celebrant and Homilist. Participating in the Mass were five Archbishops, seven Bishops, 128 priests (many of whom had been ordained by Bishop Regan), some 200 Sisters and Brothers, and thousands of lay people, both inside and outside the Cathedral. Following the Mass, Bishop Regan’s body was interred in the vault inside Christ the King Cathedral.1
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S835] Maryknoll Mission Archives, online http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/, http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/

Sister Rita Marie Regan MM1

F, #9412, b. 22 May 1907, d. 4 November 2006

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sister Rita Marie Regan MM was born on 22 May 1907 in Massachusetts, USA.1
  • Death*: She died on 4 November 2006 in Ossining, Westchester, New York, USA, at age 99.1
  • Biography*: On Saturday, November 4, 2006, at approximately 11:30 pm, Sister Rita Marie Regan died in her room in Residential Caare III at Maryknoll, New York. Sister Rita Marie turned 99 this year and celebrated her 75 anniversary as a Maryknoll Sister.

    Marie E. Regan, the second child of Mary McFarlane Regan and William Regan, was born in Fairhaven, MA. on May 22, 1907. Her one sibling, Maryknoll Bishop Joseph W. Regan, MM has predeceased her. Marie attended Sacred Hearts Academy and Fairhaven High School, graduating in 1924. She then studied for a year at Chandler Secretarial School, and for five years worked at C.C. Buchard & Co., in Boston, before entering the Maryknoll Sisters Congregation on July 2, 1931. Her brother had entered the Maryknoll Society four years earlier. Years later their home Diocese of Fall River, MA, would refer to them as the “remarkable Regans” and the “dynamic duo”.

    Marie made her First Profession of Vows on January 6, 1934, receiving the religious name of Sr. Rita Marie, which she kept for the rest of her life. Like her brother, she was assigned to China and it was in Hong Kong that she made her Final Vows on January 6, 1937.

    Sister Rita Marie’s long life has spanned much of the life of Maryknoll itself. Her 1934 and 1951, envelop a very significant period of Maryknoll history, including World War II and two years of Chinese communism. During this time, Sister served in Tungshek and Shuichai dedicating herself to direct evangelization, i.e., home visiting and catechetics, following the missionary ideals and methods of Maryknoll Bishop Francis X. Ford. She and the other Sisters lived closely among the Chinese people spending time in their villages, learning from them, teaching them and loving them. From 1946 to 1951, Sister Rita Marie was named Superior of the Maryknoll Sisters in the Vicariate of Kaying, and was known for being wise, organized and warmly caring of the Sisters. The Sisters remember her as adaptable and accepting of many things without complaint, praying for understanding rather than say an unkind word about anyone. In Kaying, along with four other Maryknoll Sisters, she was placed under house arrest for several months until being expelled in 1951 by the communist government.

    At that time, Sister Rita Marie returned to the United States for her first home visit in 17 years. For two years she worked in the Promotion Department, being called on to give many talks about China. From 1953 to 1971, she was assigned to Taiwan, and worked again in direct postolate in Miaoli where she was both Mission Superior and Local Superior. To enhance her work with adults, she took a Social Leadership course at Coady International Institute in Antigonish, Canada, receiving a diploma in May 1967.

    In 1971, Sister returned to Maryknoll to complete studies in Community Service at Rogers College while working part-time as a secretary in the Development Department. She received her Bachelor’s degree in 1973 and returned again to Taiwan. In Toufen she engaged once more in home visiting and teaching catechetics, and set up an adult education program for women and young workers. By 1989 she was culminating 34 years in the Miaoli area, when she retired to Taichung, Taiwan, to a more reduced schedule of pastoral work. When she left Toufen, it was said that she would probably always be remembered as “the Sister who rode her bicycle until she was 80!”

    In the same serene and peaceful way in which she is said to have lived her whole life, Sister Rita Marie knew when to adjust to her various steps of retirement. She accompanied her beloved brother for some months prior to his death in the Philippines in 1994, and then retired to Maryknoll. N.Y. She never lost interest in all that was going on in the Maryknoll world and was faithful to her prayer ministries for the Orientation Program and the Maryknoll Lay Missioners.

    A highlight of Sister Rita Marie’s life came in 1988, when, after 37 years absence, Sister had the joy of returning to mainland China with four other Maryknoll Sisters who had served in Kaying. She wrote of how impressed she was by the number of young people present at the dedication of a new church the Sisters attended in Hingning. Visiting their former mission in Kaying, the Sisters renewed bonds of faith and friendship with catechists, priests, sisters and other Catholics, the faces of many of whom revealed the suffering and years of imprisonment endured during the revolution. Yet no bitterness was expressed, only happiness in the sharing of tears and laughter with old friends, and in seeing the blessed fruits of Maryknollers’ labor several decades earlier.

    Today we express our sympathy to Sister’s many friends, particularly to the Sisters and priests who served with her in mission in China and Taiwan, as well as to the caring staff and companions in Maryknoll Residential Care who had come to know and love Sister Rita Marie during her later years.

    We welcome and express our gratitude to all who have come this morning and to Maryknoll Father J. David Sullivan who will preside at the Liturgy of Christian Burial for Sister Rita Marie.1
  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S835] Maryknoll Mission Archives, online http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/, http://maryknollmissionarchives.org/

Jaime I (?) King of Aragon1

M, #9413, b. 2 February 1208, d. 25 July 1276

James I
King of Aragon

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Jaime I (?) King of Aragon was born on 2 February 1208 in Montpellier, France.1,4
  • Marriage*: He married Yolande Arpad Queen consort of Aragon on 8 September 1235.5
  • Death*: Jaime I (?) King of Aragon died on 25 July 1276 in Aragon, Spain*, at age 68.1
  • Biography*: James I the Conqueror (Catalan: Jaume el Conqueridor, Occitan: Jacme lo Conquistaire, Aragonese: Chaime lo Conqueridor, Spanish: Jaime el Conquistador; 2 February 1208 – 27 July 1276) was King of Aragon, Valencia and Majorca, Count of Barcelona and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276. His long reign saw the expansion of the House of Aragón on all sides: into Valencia to the south, Languedoc to the north, and the Balearic Islands to the east. By a treaty with Louis IX of France, he wrested the county of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown. His part in the Reconquista was similar in Mediterranean Spain to that of his contemporary Ferdinand III of Castile in Andalusia.

    As a legislator and organiser, he occupies a high place among the Spanish kings. James compiled the Llibre del Consulat de Mar, which governed maritime trade and helped establish Catalan supremacy in the western Mediterranean. He was an important figure in the development of Catalan, sponsoring Catalan literature and writing a quasi-autobiographical chronicle of his reign: the Llibre dels fets.

    Early life and reign until majority
    James was born at Montpellier as the only son of Peter II of Aragon and Marie of Montpellier. As a child, James was a pawn in the power politics of Provence, where his father was engaged in struggles helping the Cathar heretics of Albi against the Albigensian Crusaders led by Simon IV de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, who were trying to exterminate them. Peter endeavoured to placate the northern crusaders by arranging a marriage between his son James and Simon's daughter. He entrusted the boy to be educated in Montfort's care in 1211, but was soon forced to take up arms against him, dying at the Battle of Muret on 12 September 1213. Montfort would willingly have used James as a means of extending his own power had not the Aragonese appealed to Pope Innocent III, who insisted that Montfort surrender him. James was handed over, at Carcassonne, in May or June 1214, to the papal legate Peter of Benevento.

    James was then sent to Monzón, where he was entrusted to the care of Guillem de Montredó, the head of the Knights Templar in Spain and Provence; the regency meanwhile fell to his great-uncle Sancho, Count of Roussillon, and his son, the king's cousin, Nuño. The kingdom was given over to confusion until, in 1217, the Templars and some of the more loyal nobles brought the young king to Zaragoza.

    In 1221, he was married to Eleanor, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile. The next six years of his reign were full of rebellions on the part of the nobles. By the Peace of Alais of 31 March 1227, the nobles and the king came to terms.

    Acquisition of Urgell
    In 1228, James faced the sternest opposition from a vassal yet. Guerau IV de Cabrera had occupied the County of Urgell in opposition to Aurembiax, the heiress of Ermengol VIII, who had died without sons in 1208. Although Aurembiax's mother, Elvira, had made herself a protegée of James's father, upon her death in 1220 Guerau had occupied the county and displaced Aurembiax, claiming that a woman could not inherit.

    James intervened on behalf of Aurembiax, whom he owed protection. He bought Guerau off and allowed Aurembiax to reclaim her territory, which she did at Lleida, probably also becoming one of James' earliest mistresses. She surrendered Lleida to James and agreed to hold Urgell in fief for him. On her death in 1231, James exchanged the Balearic Islands for Urgell with her widower, Peter of Portugal.

    Relations with France and Navarre
    From 1230 to 1232, James negotiated with Sancho VII of Navarre, who desired his help against his nephew and closest living male relative, Theobald IV of Champagne. James and Sancho negotiated a treaty whereby James would inherit Navarre on the old Sancho's death, but when this did occur, the Navarrese nobles instead elevated Theobald to the throne (1234), and James disputed it. Pope Gregory IX was required to intervene. In the end, James accepted Theobald's succession.

    James endeavoured to form a state straddling the Pyrenees in order to counterbalance the power of France north of the Loire. As with the much earlier Visigothic attempt, this policy was victim to physical, cultural, and political obstacles. As in the case of Navarre, he declined to launch into perilous adventures. By the Treaty of Corbeil, signed in May 1258, he ended his conflict with Louis IX of France, securing the renunciation of French claims to sovereignty over Catalonia.

    Reconquest
    After his false start at uniting Aragon with the Kingdom of Navarre through a scheme of mutual adoption, James turned to the south and the Mediterranean Sea where he conquered Majorca on 31 December in 1229 and the rest of the Balearic Islands. Although a group of Aragonese knights took part in the campaign because of their obligations to the king, the conquest of Majorca was mainly a Catalan undertaking (Catalans would later make up the majority of Majorca's settlers). On 5 September 1229, the troops from Aragon, consisting of 155 ships, 1,500 horsemen and 15,000 soldiers, set sail from Tarragona, Salou, and Cambrils to conquer Majorca from Abú Yahya, the semi-independent Almohad governor of the island.

    Also acquired during the reconquest were Minorca 1232 and Ibiza 1235). Valencia capitulated to Aragonese rule on 28 September 1238, following an extensive campaign that included the Siege of Burriana and the decisive Battle of the Puig, where the Aragonese commander, Bernardo Guillermo de Entenza, who was also the king's cousin, died from wounds received in action. Chroniclers say he used gunpowder in the siege of Museros castle.

    During his remaining two decades after Corbeil, James warred with the Moors in Murcia, on behalf of his son-in-law Alfonso X of Castile. On 26 March 1244, the two monarchs signed the Treaty of Almizra to establish their zones of expansion into Andalusia so as to prevent squabbling between them. Specifically, it defined the borders of the newly created Kingdom of Valencia. James signed it on that date, but Alfonso did not affirm it until much later. According to the treaty, all lands south of a line from Biar to Villajoyosa through Busot were reserved for Castile.

    Crusade of 1269
    The "Khan of Tartary" (actually the Ilkhan) Abaqa corresponded with James in early 1267, inviting him to join forces with the Mongols and go on crusade. James sent an ambassador to Abaqa in the person of Jayme Alaric de Perpignan, who returned with a Mongol embassy in 1269. Pope Clement IV tried to dissuade James from crusading, regarding his moral character as sub-par, and Alfonso X did the same. Nonetheless, James, who was then campaigning in Murcia, made peace with Mohammed I ibn Nasr, the Sultan of Granada, and set about collecting funds for a crusade. After organising the government for his absence and assembling a fleet at Barcelona in September 1269, he was ready to sail east. The troubadour Olivier lo Templier composed a song praising the voyage and hoping for its success. A storm, however, drove him off course, and he landed at Aigues-Mortes. According to the continuator of William of Tyre, he returned via Montpellier por l'amor de sa dame Berenguiere ("for the love his lady Berengaria") and abandoned any further effort at a crusade.

    James's sons Pedro Fernández and Fernán Sánchez, who had been given command of part of the fleet, did continue on their way to Acre, where they arrived in December. They found that Baibars, the Mameluke Sultan of Egypt, had broken his truce with the Kingdom of Jerusalem and was making a demonstration of his military power in front of Acre. During the demonstration, Egyptian troops hidden in the bushes ambushed a returning Frankish force that had been in Galilee. James's sons, initially eager for a fight, changed their minds after this spectacle and returned home via Sicily, where Fernán Sánchez was knighted by Charles of Anjou.

    Patronage of art, learning, and literature
    James built and consecrated the Cathedral of Lleida, which was constructed in a style transitional between Romanesque and Gothic with little influence from Moorish styles.
    James was a patron of the University of Montpellier, which owed much of its development to his impetus. He also founded a studium at Valencia in 1245 and received privileges for it from Pope Innocent IV, but it did not develop as splendidly. In 1263, James presided over a debate in Barcelona between the Jewish rabbi Nahmanides and Pablo Christiani, a prominent converso.

    James was the first great sponsor and patron of vernacular Catalan literature. Indeed, he may himself be called "the first of the Catalan prose writers." James wrote or dictated at various stages a chronicle of his own life in Catalan, Llibre dels fets, the first autobiography by a Christian king. As well as being a fine example of autobiography, the "Book of Deeds" expresses concepts of the power and purpose of monarchy, examples of loyalty and treachery in the feudal order, and medieval military tactics. More controversially, some historians have looked at these writings as a source of Catalan identity, separate from that of Occitania and Rome.

    James also wrote the Libre de la Saviesa or "Book of Wisdom." The book contains proverbs from various authors, reaching from the time of King Solomon to nearly his own time with Albertus Magnus. It even contains maxims from the medieval Arab philosophers and from the Apophthegmata Philosophorum of Honein ben Ishak, which was probably translated at Barcelona during his reign. A Hebrew translator by the name of Jehuda was employed at James's court during this period.

    Though James was himself a prose writer and sponsored mostly prose works, he had an appreciation of verse. In consequence of the Albigensian Crusade, many troubadours were forced to flee southern France and many found refuge in Aragon. Notwithstanding his early patronage of poetry, by the influence of his confessor Ramon de Penyafort, James brought the Inquisition into his realm in 1233 to prevent any vernacular translation of the Bible.

    Succession
    The favour James showed his illegitimate offspring led to protest from the nobles, and to conflicts between his legitimate and illegitimate sons. When one of the latter, Fernán Sánchez, who had behaved with gross ingratitude and treason toward his father, was slain by the legitimate son Peter, the old king recorded his grim satisfaction.

    In his will, James divided his states between his sons by Yolanda of Hungary: the aforementioned Peter received the Hispanic possessions on the mainland and James, the Kingdom of Majorca (including the Balearic Islands and the counties of Roussillon and Cerdanya) and the Lordship of Montpellier. The division inevitably produced fratricidal conflicts. In 1276, the king fell very ill at Alzira and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet, but he died at Valencia on 27 July.

    His mummified body was later exhumed in 1856, when the monastery was under repair. A photograph of the king was taken. The photograph of the head of the mummy clearly shows the wound in the left eyebrow that the king himself explained in a passage from his Llibre dels fets (Book of Deeds):
    As I was coming with the men, I happened to turn my head towards the town in order to look at the Saracens, who had come out in great force, when a cross-bowman shot at me, and hit me beside the sun-hood, and the shot struck me on the head, the bolt lighting near the forehead. It was God's will it did not pass through the head, but the point of the arrow went half through it. In anger I struck the arrow so with my hand that I broke it: the blood came out down my face; I wiped it off with a mantle of "sendal" I had, and went away laughing, that the army might not take alarm.

    Marriages and children
    James first married, in 1221, Eleanor, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England. Though he later had the marriage annulled, his one son by her was declared legitimate:
    Alfonso (1229–1260), married Constance of Béarn, Viscountess of Marsan

    In 1235, James remarried to Yolanda, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary by his second wife Yolande de Courtenay. She bore him numerous children:
    Yolanda, also known as Violant, (1236–1301), married Alfonso X of Castile
    Constance (1239–1269), married Manuel of Castile, son of Ferdinand III
    Peter (1240–1285), successor in Aragon, Catalonia, and Valencia
    James (1243–1311), successor in Balearics and Languedoc
    Ferdinand (1245–1250)
    Sancha (1246–before 1275), died in the Holy Land.
    Isabella (1248–1271), married Philip III of France
    Mary (1248–1267), nun
    Sancho, Archbishop of Toledo (1250–1279)
    Eleanor (born 1251, died young)

    James married thirdly Teresa Gil de Vidaure, but only by a private document, and left her when she developed leprosy.
    James (c.1255–1285), lord of Xèrica
    Peter (1259–1318), lord of Ayerbe

    The children in the third marriage were recognised in his last will as being in the line of succession to the throne, should the senior lines fail.

    James also had several lovers, both during and after his marriages, and a few bore him illegitimate sons.
    By Blanca d'Antillón:
    Ferran Sanchis (or Fernando Sánchez; 1240–1275), baron of Castro
    By Berenguela Fernández:
    Pedro Fernández, baron of Híjar
    By Elvira Sarroca:
    Jaume Sarroca (born 1248), Archbishop of Huesca.4

Family: Yolande Arpad Queen consort of Aragon b. c 1200, d. c 1251

  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2015

Yolande Arpad Queen consort of Aragon1,2

F, #9414, b. circa 1200, d. circa 1251

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: Violant of Hungary (c. 1215–1251) was a Queen consort of Aragon and the second wife of King James I of Aragon. She is also called Jolánta in Hungarian, Iolanda or Violant d'Hongria in Catalan and Yolanda or Violante de Hungría in Spanish.

    Family
    Violant was born at Esztergom circa 1215, the only child of King Andrew II of Hungary and his second wife Yolanda of Courtenay.

    Marriage
    Violant married James in 1235. James had already been married to Eleanor of Castile, but he had this marriage annulled on the basis of consanguinity in 1229. He and Eleanor had a son named Alfonso, who was considered legitimate, but who died prior to his father.

    James and Violant had ten children:
    Violant of Aragon (1236–1301), Queen of Castile by her marriage to Alfonso X of Castile
    Constance of Aragon, Lady of Villena (1239-1269)
    Peter III of Aragon (1240–1285)
    James II of Majorca (1243–1311)
    Ferdinand of Aragon (1245–1250)
    Sancha of Aragon (1246–1251)
    Isabella of Aragon (1247–1271), Queen of France by her marriage to Philip III of France
    Maria of Aragon (1248–1267), nun
    Sancho (1250–1275), Archbishop of Toledo
    Eleanor of Aragon (born 1251, date of death unknown; died young)
    Violant was the grandmother of King Philip IV of France and Charles, Count of Valois through her daughter Isabella. Charles was the father of Philip VI of France.

    Public Activity
    Violant was a woman of talent and character. Next to James I, she had an important political role in the Crown of Aragon. She was one of the most valuable advisors of the king, on whom she had a strong influence.

    She intervened decisively in international agreements as important as the Treaty of Almizra with Castile (1244). It was signed with the condition that Zayyan ibn Mardanish surrender of the city of Valencia, into which she triumphantly entered with her husband on 9 October 1238.

    Death and burial
    Violant reportedly died 1n 1251, although there is some doubt about the exact year. Jerónimo Zurita, in his Anales de Aragon, mentions this discrepancy, and writes that while some annals state that Violant died in Santa María de Salas in 1251, others report that she lived for a few years after (the probable sources of the 1253 date), and that she only made her will and testament in Huesca in 1251. Zurita continues that her will stipulated her burial at Vallbona, bequeathed the county of Posana (Poszony) to her sons Peter, James, and Sancho (Poszony being in the possession of her half-brother Béla IV of Hungary, but apparently left to her by her mother Queen Yolanda), and mentioned that she had 5 daughters with the king.

    Violant and her daughter Sancha's remains are at the Monastery of Santa Maria de Vallbona in Vallbona de les Monges, Catalonia. Violant chose burial in that monastery as she was a benefactor. Her tomb, placed along the wall on the right of the chancel, is fairly simple. It is raised on two pillars decorated with individual gold crosses inscribed in red (gules) circles, and has a gabled lid of white stone. In the center of the lid is a cross with the same characteristics as those on the pillars, but larger and without color. The only ornamentations on the box itself are three depictions of her husband's royal coat of arms - one on the visible side and one at each end. The Queen's remains were moved to the tomb in 1275, as indicated by the inscription on the visible side of the box: Fuit translata donna | Violán regina | Aragonum | anno 1275. In 2002, the Hungarian government financed a restoration of her tomb, costing 12,000 euros, but the monastic community denied permission to study its interior. Violant is the only member of the Árpád dynasty whose remains are undisturbed.

    James I remarried one more time, to Teresa Gil de Vidaure, who was previously his mistress.2
  • Name Variation: Yolande Arpad Queen consort of Aragon was also known as Violant of Hungary Queen consort of Aragon.2
  • Birth*: She was born circa 1200 in Hungary.1
  • Marriage*: She married Jaime I (?) King of Aragon, son of Pedro II (?) King of Aragon and Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon, on 8 September 1235.1
  • Death*: Yolande Arpad Queen consort of Aragon died circa 1251 in Aragon, Spain*.1,2

Family: Jaime I (?) King of Aragon b. 2 Feb 1208, d. 25 Jul 1276

  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2015

Pedro II (?) King of Aragon1

M, #9415, b. 1176, d. 13 September 1213

Peter II
King of Aragon
Count of Barcelona

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Pedro II (?) King of Aragon was born in 1176 in Aragon, Spain*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon in 1204.2
  • Death*: Pedro II (?) King of Aragon died on 13 September 1213 in killed in action, Murat, France.1
  • Biography*: Peter II the Catholic (July 1178 – 12 September 1213) was the King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona from 1196 to 1213.

    He was born in Huesca, the son of Alfonso II of Aragon and Sancha of Castile. In 1205 he acknowledged the feudal supremacy of the papacy and was crowned in Rome by Pope Innocent III, swearing to defend the Catholic faith (hence his surname, "the Catholic"). He was the first king of Aragon to be crowned by the pope.

    In the first decade of the thirteenth century he commissioned the Liber feudorum Ceritaniae, an illustrated codex cartulary for the counties of Cerdagne, Conflent, and Roussillon.

    On June 15, 1204 he married (as her third husband) Marie of Montpellier, daughter and heiress of William VIII of Montpellier by Eudocia Comnena. She gave him a son, James, but Peter soon repudiated her. Marie was popularly venerated as a saint for her piety and marital suffering, but was never canonized; she died in Rome in 1213.

    He participated in the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa in 1212 that marked the turning point of Arab domination on the Iberian peninsula.

    The Crown of Aragon was widespread in the area that is now southernwestern France, but which at that time was under the control of vassal local princes, such as the Counts of Toulouse. The Cathars or Albingenses rejected the authority and the teachings of the Catholic Church. Innocent called upon Louis VIII of France to suppress the Albigenses. Under the leadership of Simon of Montfort a campaign was launched. The Albigensian Crusade, which led to the slaughter of approximately 20,000 men, women and children, Cathar and Catholic alike, essentially destroyed the previously flourishing civilization of Occitania and brought the region firmly under the control of the King of France, and the Capetian dynasty from the north of France.

    Peter returned from Las Navas in autumn 1212 to find that Simon de Montfort had conquered Toulouse, exiling Count Raymond VI of Toulouse, who was Peter's brother-in-law and vassal. Peter crossed the Pyrenees and arrived at Muret in September 1213 to confront Montfort's army. He was accompanied by Raymond of Toulouse, who tried to persuade Peter to avoid battle and instead starve out Montfort's forces. This suggestion was rejected.

    The Battle of Muret began on September 12, 1213. The Aragonese forces were disorganized and disintegrated under the assault of Montfort's squadrons. Peter himself was caught in the thick of fighting, and died as a result of a foolhardy act of bravado. He was thrown to the ground and killed. The Aragonese forces broke in panic when their king was slain and Montfort's crusaders won a crushing victory.

    The nobility of Toulouse, vassals of the Crown of Aragon, were defeated. The conflict culminated in the Treaty of Meaux-Paris in 1229, in which the integration of the Occitan territory into the French crown was agreed upon.

    Upon Peter's death, the kingdom passed to his only son by Marie of Montpellier, the future James the Conqueror.3

Family: Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon b. 1182, d. 21 Apr 1213

  • Last Edited: 27 Jul 2015

Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon1

F, #9416, b. 1182, d. 21 April 1213

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Biography*: Marie of Montpellier (adapted from Occitan: Maria de Montpelhièr) (1182 – 21 April 1213) was Lady of Montpellier and by her three marriages Viscountess of Marseille, Countess of Comminges and Queen of Aragon.

    She was the daughter of William VIII, Lord of Montpellier, by his wife Eudokia Komnene, a niece of Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Komnenos.

    Life
    Since her birth, Marie was the legitimate heiress of the Lordship of Montpellier, because a clausule of the marriage contract of her parents established that the firstborn child, boy or girl, would succeed in Montpellier on William VIII's death.

    In April 1187, William VIII repudiated Eudokia Komnene and married with certain Agnes, a relative of the Kings of Aragon. She bore him eight children, six sons and two daughters. Although Eudokia entered in a convent in Aniane as a Benedictine nun, William VIII's second marriage was declared invalid and all the children born from this union declared illegitimate, so Marie remained as the undisputed heiress of Montpellier.

    Marie married Viscount Raymond Geoffrey II of Marseille, also named Barral, in 1192 or shortly before, but was widowed at the end of that year. Her second marriage, in December 1197, was to Count Bernard IV of Comminges, and at the insistence of her father, Marie renounced to her rights over Montpellier in favor of her eldest half-brother William (IX), son of Agnes.

    From her marriage with Bernard IV, Marie had two daughters, Mathilde (by marriage Viscountess de la Barthe) and Petronille (by marriage Countess of Astarac). The marriage was, however, notoriously polygamous (Bernard IV had two other living wives) and was finally annulled (some say on Marie's insistence, some say on that of King Peter II of Aragon) in 1201. With this annulment, Marie was once more heir to Montpellier, but her father never recognized her and openly acknowledge his son William IX as his heir.
    William VIII died in 1202. Marie's half-brother William IX had taken control of the city, but she asserted her right to it. On 15 June 1204 Marie married Peter II of Aragon and thanks to a revolt against William IX, she was recognised as Lady of Montpellier.

    From her marriage with Peter II, Marie gave birth two children: Infanta Sancha (born in 1205, died aged one) and Infante James, the future King James I the Conqueror (born on 1 February 1208). Peter II immediately attempted to divorce her, hoping both to marry Maria of Montferrat, Queen of Jerusalem, and to claim Montpellier for himself. Marie's last years were spent in combating these political and matrimonial manoeuvres. Pope Innocent III finally decided in her favour, refusing to permit the divorce. Marie died in Rome (21 April 1213) in her way back to Aragon, and Peter II a few months later (14 September 1213) at the Battle of Muret. Marie and Peter II's only surviving child, James I, inherited Aragon and Montpellier.1
  • Birth*: Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon was born in 1182 in Montpellier, France.1
  • Marriage*: She married Pedro II (?) King of Aragon, son of Alphonso Raimond II (?) King of Aragon and Sanchia de Castilla, in 1204.1
  • Death*: Maud de Montpellier Queen of Aragon died on 21 April 1213 in Rome, Italy.1

Family: Pedro II (?) King of Aragon b. 1176, d. 13 Sep 1213

  • Last Edited: 11 Jan 2016

Alfonso VIII (?) King of Castile1,2

M, #9417, b. 11 November 1155, d. 22 September 1214

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Alfonso VIII (?) King of Castile was born on 11 November 1155 in Castile, Spain*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Eleanor (?) of England, Queen of Castile, daughter of Henry II 'Curtmantle' d'Anjou King of England and Eleanor (?) Dutchess of Aquitaine, before 17 September 1177 in Burgos, Spain*.4
  • Death*: Alfonso VIII (?) King of Castile died on 22 September 1214 in Gutierre-Munoz, Spain*, at age 58.1
  • Biography*: Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155[2] – 5 October 1214), called the Noble or el de las Navas, was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo. He is most remembered for his part in the Reconquista and the downfall of the Almohad Caliphate. After having suffered a great defeat with his own army at Alarcos against the Almohads in 1195 he led the coalition of Christian princes and foreign crusaders who broke the power of the Almohads in the Battle of the Navas de Tolosa in 1212, an event which marked the arrival of a tide of Christian supremacy on the Iberian peninsula.

    His reign saw the domination of Castile over León and, by his alliance with Aragon, he drew those two spheres of Christian Iberia into close connection.

    Regency and civil war
    Alfonso was born to Sancho III of Castile and Blanche, in Soria on 11 November 1155. He was named after his grandfather Alfonso VII of León and Castile, who divided his kingdoms between his sons. This division set the stage for conflict in the family until the kingdoms were re-united by Alfonso VIII's grandson, Ferdinand III of Castile.

    His early life resembled that of other medieval kings. His father died in 1158. Though proclaimed king when only three years of age, Alfonso was regarded as merely nominal by the unruly nobles to whom a minority was convenient. Immediately, Castile was plunged into conflicts between the various noble houses vying for ascendancy in the inevitable regency. The devotion of a squire of his household, who carried him on the pommel of his saddle to the stronghold of San Esteban de Gormaz, saved him from falling into the hands of the contending factions. The noble houses of Lara and Castro both claimed the regency, as did the boy's uncle, Ferdinand II of León. In 1159 the young Alfonso was put briefly in the custody of García Garcés de Aza, who was not wealthy enough to support him. In March 1160 the Castro and Lara met at the Battle of Lobregal and the Castro were victorious, but the guardianship of Alfonso and the regency fell to Manrique Pérez de Lara.

    Alfonso was put in the custody of the loyal village Ávila. At barely fifteen, he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo from the hands of the Laras.

    Marriage and Foreign Relations
    During the regency, his uncle Sancho VI of Navarre took advantage of the chaos and the king's minority to seize lands along the border, including much of La Rioja. In 1170, Alfonso sent an embassy to Bordeaux to Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine to seek the hand of their daughter Eleanor. Due to the bride's young age of 9, the marriage was finalized at Burgos, before 17 September 1177. The marriage treaty helped provide Alfonso with a powerful ally against his uncle. In 1176, Alfonso asked his father-in-law to arbitrate the disputed border territories. While Alfonso received back much which had been taken from him, he did have to pay significant monetary compensation.

    In 1186, he recuperated part of La Rioja from the Kingdom of Navarre.

    In 1187, Alfonso negotiated with Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor who was seeking to marry his son Conrad to Alfonso's eldest child and heir, Berengaria. In April of 1188 they agreed on a treaty in Seligenstadt which made clear that she was the heir of Castile after any sons of Alfonso, and that Conrad would only co-rule as her spouse. This became relevant in her ultimate succession to the throne, even though the marriage to Conrad was never consummated and later annulled. The treaty also documented traditional rights and obligations between the sovereign and the nobles in Castile. In July of 1188, Alfonso convened his court in Carrión de los Condes to allow the nobles to review and ratify the treaty. At that court, Alfonso knighted both Conrad and Alfonso IX of León, who would ultimately marry Berengaria. The younger Alfonso had come to seek the support and acknowledgement of his ascent to the throne of León from his older cousin. The elder Alfonso granted this in exchange for acknowledgement that the king of Castile was overlord of the king of León.

    The relationship between the cousins Alfonso continued to be filled with conflict. In 1194, the papal legate negotiated a treaty between them to temporarily end the conflict. However, after Castile was defeated at the Battle of Alarcos, the younger Alfonso seized the opportunity to again attack his cousin. Castille defended itself with papal support. A more lasting peace was achieved finally by the older Alfonso's daughter Berengaria getting married to the younger Alfonso in 1197. The annulment of this marriage by the pope drove the younger Alfonso to again attack his cousin in 1204, but treaties made in 1205, 1207, and 1209 each forced him to concede further territories and rights. The treaty in 1207 is the first existing public document in the Castilian dialect.

    Around 1200 when his brother in law John was on the English throne, Alfonso began to claim that Gascony was part of Eleanor's dowry, though there was nothing in the marriage treaty to indicate this. In 1205, he invaded, hoping to make good on his claim. By 1208, he gave up on the venture, though his heirs would come back to this claim generations later.

    Reconquista
    In 1174, he ceded Uclés to the Order of Santiago and afterwards this became the order's principal seat. From Uclés, he began a campaign which culminated in the reconquest of Cuenca in 1177. The city surrendered on 21 September, the feast of Saint Matthew, ever afterwards celebrated by the citizens of the town.

    Alfonso took the initiative to ally all Christian kingdoms of the peninsula — Navarre, León, Portugal, and Aragon — against the Almohads. By the Treaty of Cazola of 1179, the zones of expansion of each kingdom were defined.

    After founding Plasencia (Cáceres) in 1186, he embarked on a major initiative to unite the Castilian nobility around the Reconquista.

    In 1195, after the treaty with the Almohads was broken, he came to the defence of Alarcos on the river Guadiana, then the principal Castilian town in the region. At the subsequent Battle of Alarcos, he was roundly defeated by the caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf al-Mansur. The reoccupation of the surrounding territory by the Almohads was quickly commenced with Calatrava falling first. For the next seventeen years, the frontier between Moor and Castilian was fixed in the hill country just outside Toledo.

    Finally, in 1212, through the mediation of Pope Innocent III, a crusade was called against the Almohads. Castilians under Alfonso, Aragonese and Catalans under Peter II, Navarrese under Sancho VII, and Franks under the archbishop of Narbonne, Arnaud Amalric, all flocked to the effort. The military orders also lent their support. Calatrava first, then Alarcos, and finally Benavente were captured before a final battle was fought at Las Navas de Tolosa near Santa Elena on 16 July. The caliph Muhammad an-Nasir was routed and Almohad power broken.

    Cultural legacy
    Alfonso was the founder of the first Spanish university, a studium generale at Palencia, which, however, did not survive him. His court also served as an important instrument for Spanish cultural achievement.

    Alfonso died at Gutierre-Muñoz and was succeeded by his surviving son, Henry I.

    Alfonso was the subject for Lion Feuchtwanger's novel Die Jüdin von Toledo (The Jewess of Toledo), in which is narrated an affair with a Jewish subject in medieval Toledo in a time when Spain was known to be the land of tolerance and learning for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. The titular Jewish woman of the novel is based on Alfonso's paramour, Rahel la Fermosa. Scholars continue to debate the historical truth of this relationship. The 1919 film The Jewess of Toledo by Franz Höbling is also based on this relationship.1


Family: Eleanor (?) of England, Queen of Castile b. 13 Oct 1162, d. 31 Oct 1214

  • Last Edited: 27 Jul 2015

Eleanor (?) of England, Queen of Castile1

F, #9418, b. 13 October 1162, d. 31 October 1214

Eleanor of England
Queen consort of Castile

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Eleanor (?) of England, Queen of Castile was born on 13 October 1162 in in the castle at Domfront, Normandy, France*.1
  • Marriage*: She married Alfonso VIII (?) King of Castile, son of Sancho III (?) King of Castile, before 17 September 1177 in Burgos, Spain*.1
  • Death*: Eleanor (?) of England, Queen of Castile died on 31 October 1214 in Castile, Spain*, at age 52.1
  • Biography*: Eleanor of England (Spanish: Leonor; 13 October 1162 – 31 October 1214) was Queen of Castile and Toledo as wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile. She was the sixth child and second daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine and received her first name as a namesake of her mother.

    Early life and family
    She was born in the castle at Domfront, Normandy on 13 October 1161, and was baptised by Henry of Marcy. Her half-siblings were Marie and Alix of France, and her full siblings were Henry the Young, Duchess Matilda, King Richard, Duke Geoffrey, Queen Joan and Prince John.

    Queenship
    When she was 14 years old, before 17 September 1177, Eleanor was married to King Alfonso VIII of Castile in Burgos. The marriage had been arranged some years earlier; the couple were betrothed in 1170 but, because of Eleanor’s youth at that time, the wedding was delayed. Her parents' purpose in arranging the marriage was to secure Aquitaine’s Pyrenean border, while Alfonso was seeking an ally in his struggles with his uncle, Sancho VI of Navarre. In 1177, this led to Henry overseeing arbitration of the border dispute.

    Around the year 1200, Alfonso began to claim that the duchy of Gascony was part of Eleanor's dowry, but there is no documented foundation for that claim. It is highly unlikely that Henry II would have parted with so significant a portion of his domains. At most, Gascony may have been pledged as security for the full payment of his daughter’s dowry. Her husband went so far on this claim as to invade Gascony in her name in 1205. In 1206, her brother John, King of England granted her safe passage to visit him, perhaps to try opening peace negotiations. In 1208, Alfonso yielded on the claim. Decades later, their great-grandson Alfonso X of Castile would claim the duchy on the grounds that her dowry had never been fully paid.

    Of all Eleanor of Aquitaine’s daughters, her namesake was the only one who was enabled, by political circumstances, to wield the kind of influence her mother had exercised. In her own marriage treaty, and in the first marriage treaty for her daughter Berengaria, Eleanor was given direct control of many lands, towns, and castles throughout the kingdom.[14] She was almost as powerful as Alfonso, who specified in his will in 1204 that she was to rule alongside their son in the event of his death, including taking responsibility for paying his debts and executing his will.[15] It was she who persuaded him to marry their daughter Berengaria to Alfonso IX of León. Troubadours and sages were regularly present in Alfonso VIII’s court due to Eleanor’s patronage.

    Eleanor took particular interest in supporting religious institutions. In 1179, she took responsibility to support and maintain a shrine to St. Thomas Becket in the cathedral of Toledo. She also created and supported the Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas, which served as a refuge and tomb for her family for generations, and its affiliated hospital.

    When Alfonso died, Eleanor was reportedly so devastated with grief that she was unable to preside over the burial. Their eldest daughter Berengaria instead performed these honours. Eleanor then took sick and died only twenty-eight days after her husband, and was buried at Abbey of Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas.1



Family: Alfonso VIII (?) King of Castile b. 11 Nov 1155, d. 22 Sep 1214

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleanor_of_England,_Queen_of_Castile.

Sancho III (?) King of Castile1

M, #9419, b. circa 1134, d. 31 August 1158

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sancho III (?) King of Castile was born circa 1134 in Castile, Spain*.1
  • Death*: He died on 31 August 1158 in Spain*.1
  • Biography*: Sancho III (1134 – 31 August 1158) was King of Castile and Toledo for one year, from 1157 to 1158. During the Reconquista, in which he took an active part, he founded the Order of Calatrava. He was called el Deseado (the Desired) due to his position as the first child of his parents, born after eight years of childless marriage.

    Life
    He was the eldest son of King Alfonso VII of León and Castile and Berengaria of Barcelona. During his father's reign, he appears as "king of Nájera" as early as 1149. His father's will partitioned the kingdom between his two sons: Sancho inherited the kingdoms of Castile and Toledo, and Ferdinand inherited León. The two brothers had just signed a treaty when Sancho suddenly died in the summer of 1158, being buried at Toledo.

    He had married, in 1151, Blanche of Navarre, daughter of García Ramírez of Navarre, and had two sons:
    Alfonso VIII of Castile, his successor
    infante García, who died at birth in 1156, apparently also resulting in the death of Queen Blanche.
    There may also have been an older son who died in infancy.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 27 Jul 2015

Berengaria de Barcelona Queen consort of Castile1

F, #9420, b. 1116

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Berengaria de Barcelona Queen consort of Castile was born in 1116 in Barcelona, Spain*.1
  • Marriage*: She married Alfonso VII (?) King of Castile, son of Raymond (?) of Burgundy and Urraca (?) Queen of Castile, on 10 November 1128 in Saldana, Spain*.1
  • Biography*: Berenguela or Berengaria of Barcelona (1116 – January 15, 1149) was Queen consort of Castile, León and Galicia. She was the daughter of Raimon III of Barcelona and Dulce Aldonza Milhaud] Berenguela was the sister of Ramon Berenguer IV who was the ruler of the Kingdom of Aragon.

    On November 10/17 1128 in Saldaña, Berengaria married Alfonso VII, King of Castile, León and Galicia (1127–1157). Their children were:
    Sancho III of Castile (1134–1158)
    Ramon, living 1136, died in infancy
    Ferdinand II of León (1137–1188)
    Constance (c. 1138–1160), married Louis VII of France
    Sancha (c. 1139–1179), married Sancho VI of Navarre
    García (c. 1142–1145/6)
    Alfonso (c. 1144–c. 1149)

    In her lifetime a new political entity was formed in the northeast Iberian Peninsula: Portugal seceded from León in the west, giving more balance to the Christian kingdoms of the Iberian peninsula. Her brother Ramon Berenguer successfully pulled Aragon out of its pledged submission to Castile, aided no doubt by the beauty and charm of his sister Berengaria, for which she was well known in her time.

    Her niece Dulce of Aragon married Sancho I of Portugal, whilst her famous granddaughter was Queen Berengaria of England.
    She died in Palencia, and was buried at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.1

Family: Alfonso VII (?) King of Castile b. 1 Mar 1105, d. 21 Aug 1157

  • Last Edited: 12 Jan 2016