Guy de Crecy1

M, #9271, b. circa 1070

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas,_Lord_of_Coucy.

Enguerrand I (?) Lord of Coucy1

M, #9272, b. circa 1042, d. 1116

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Enguerrand I (?) Lord of Coucy was born circa 1042 in Coucy, France.1
  • Marriage*: He married Ada de Marle circa 1073 in France.1
  • Death*: Enguerrand I (?) Lord of Coucy died in 1116 in France.1
  • Biography*: Enguerrand I (c. 1042 – 1116) was the Lord of Coucy from 1086 to 1116.

    Enguerrand was a man of many scandals. With the help of the Bishop of Laon he divorced his first wife, Adèle de Marle, for adultery. When he married his next wife, Sibyl of Château-Porcien, she was still married to Godfrey of Namur, the Lord of Lorraine who was absent and in a war. Enguerrand and Sybil's first husband became bitter enemies and continued to fight a private war.

    Adèle's son Thomas de Marle hated his father and joined the enemies against his father. Nevertheless, when in 1095 the first crusade started, both he and his son joined in the adventure. Thomas succeeded Enguerrand upon his death.

    Family
    Enguerrand was the son of Drogo, Lord of Boves.

    Enguerrand married Adèle (Ada) de Marle, the divorced wife of Aubry, Viscount of Coucy, daughter of Letard de Roucy, Lord of Marle. Enguerrand and Ada had three children:
    Thomas de Marle (1078–1130/31). Lord of Coucy and Marle, Count of Amiens.
    Beatrix de Boves (?1144). Married Adam Châtelain d´Amiens.
    Robert de Coucy.

    Enguerrand is said to have kidnapped Sibyl of Château-Porcien, the wife of Godfrey of Namur. He later married her and they had a daughter.1

Family: Ada de Marle b. c 1050

  • Last Edited: 13 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enguerrand_I,_Lord_of_Coucy.

Ada de Marle1

F, #9273, b. circa 1050

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Enguerrand I (?) Lord of Coucy b. c 1042, d. 1116

  • Last Edited: 13 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enguerrand_I,_Lord_of_Coucy.

Drogo (?) Lord of Boves1

M, #9274, b. circa 1020

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Drogo (?) Lord of Boves was born circa 1020 in France.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enguerrand_I,_Lord_of_Coucy.

Robert I (?) Count of Dreux1

M, #9275, b. circa 1123

Robert I, Count of Dreux

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert I (?) Count of Dreux was born circa 1123 in France.1
  • Marriage*: He married Agnes de Baudemont Countess of Braine circa 1154 in France*.1
  • Biography*: Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c.?1123 – 11 October 1188), was the fifth son of Louis VI of France and Adélaide de Maurienne. Through his mother he was related to the Carolingians and to the Marquess William V of Montferrat.

    In 1137 he received the County of Dreux as an appanage from his father. He held this title until 1184 when he granted it to his son Robert II.

    In 1139 he married Agnes de Garlande. In 1145, he married Hawise of Salisbury. By his third marriage to Agnes de Baudemont in 1152, he received the County of Braine-sur-Vesle, and the lordships of Fère-en-Tardenois, Pontarcy, Nesle, Longueville, Quincy-en-Tardenois, Savigny, and Baudemont.

    Robert I participated in the Second Crusade and was at the Siege of Damascus in 1148. In 1158 he fought against the English and participated in the Siege of Séez in 1154.

    Marriages and children
    1.Agnes de Garlande (1122–1143), daughter of Anseau de Garlande, count of Rochefort.
    Simon (1141 – bef. 1182), lord of La Noue

    2.Hawise of Salisbury (1118–1152), daughter of Walter Fitz Edward of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire
    Adèle of Dreux (1145 – aft. 1210), married firstly Valéran III, count of Breteuil, secondly Guy II, lord of Châtillon-sur-Marne, thirdly Jean I de Thorotte, fourthly Raoul III de Nesle, count of Soissons.
    Alice or Adelheid (1144–?)

    3.Agnes de Baudemont, Countess of Braine (1130 – c. 1202).
    Robert II (1154–1218), count of Dreux and Braine.
    Henry (1155–1199), bishop of Orléans
    Alix (1156 – aft. 1217), married Raoul I, lord of Coucy
    Philippe (1158–1217), bishop of Beauvais.
    Isabella (1160–1239), married Hugh III of Broyes
    Peter (1161–1186)
    William (1163 – aft. 1189), lord of Braye, Torcy, and Chilly
    John (1164 – aft. 1189)
    Mamilie (1166–1200)
    Margaret (1167–?), nun

    The Sicilian chancellor Stephen du Perche may also have been a son (legitimate or not) of his.1

Family: Agnes de Baudemont Countess of Braine b. c 1130, d. c 1202

  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Dreux.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10311.htm#i103110

Othelendis (?) of Saxony1

F, #9276, b. circa 1000

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Dirk III (?) Count of Holland b. b 993, d. 1039

  • Last Edited: 13 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Dreux.

Bernard II (?) Duke of Saxony1

M, #9277, b. circa 995, d. 29 June 1095

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Bernard II (?) Duke of Saxony was born circa 995 in Saxony, Germany*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Eilika (?) of Schweinfurt, daughter of Henry of Schweinfurt Margrave of the Nordgau and Gerberga (?) of Wetterau, circa 1030 in Germany*.3
  • Death*: Bernard II (?) Duke of Saxony died on 29 June 1095.1
  • Biography*: Bernard II (c. 995 – 29 June 1059) was the Duke of Saxony (1011–1059), the third of the Billung dynasty, a son of Bernard I and Hildegard. He had the rights of a count in Frisia.

    Bernard expanded the powers of the duke in Saxony and is regarded as the greatest of the Billungers. He was originally a supporter of Emperor Henry II and he accompanied him into Poland and negotiated the treaty of Bautzen of 1018. In 1019–1020, he revolted and gained the recognition of the tribal laws of Saxony, something his father had just failed to do. He returned then to war with the Slavs (Obodrites and Lutici) and drew them into his sphere of power and influence through their leader, Godescalc (Gottschalk).
    He supported Conrad II in 1024 and his son Henry III, though he began to fear the latter for his closeness to the Archbishop Adalbert of Bremen, an inveterate enemy of the dukes of Saxony. Though he was a critical ally of the Danes, so fundamental to Henry's wars in the Low Countries, Bernard was on the brink of rebellion until the death of Adalbert. The remainder of his reign, however, was quiet.

    In 1045, he erected the Alsterburg in Hamburg. He died in 1059 and was succeeded without incident by his son Ordulf. He is buried in the Church of Saint Michael in Lüneburg.

    Issue of Bernard II, Duke of Saxony and Eilika of Schweinfurt
    Bernard II, Duke of Saxony married to Eilika of Schweinfurt, daughter of Henry of Schweinfurt. They had:
    Gertrude of Saxony (c. 1030 – August 4, 1113), married: Floris I, Count of Holland, married (secondly): Robert I, Count of Flanders
    Ordulf, Duke of Saxony (c. 1020 – March 28, 1072), married: Ulfhilde or Wulfhilde of Norway (c. 1023 – May 24, 1070), daughter of Saint & King Olaf II (St.Olaf) of Norway & Astrid of Sweden
    Hermann
    Ida of Saxony, married: Albert III, Count of Namur.1

Family: Eilika (?) of Schweinfurt b. c 1005, d. a 1059

  • Last Edited: 31 Dec 2015

William MacFarlane1

M, #9278, b. 17 July 1869

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S427] CBGHA, online www.cbgha.org, 2015-04
    Guysborough County, Nova Scotia
    Civil Birth Records.

Lady Elizabeth Stewart1,2

F, #9279, b. circa 1440

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Archibald Campbell 2nd Earl of Argyll b. c 1455, d. 9 Sep 1513

  • Last Edited: 16 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Campbell,_2nd_Earl_of_Argyll.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10924.htm#i109236

John de Montmirel-en-Brie Lord de Montmirel-en-Brie1

M, #9280, b. circa 1160

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 24 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10781.htm#i107806

Helvide de Dampierre1

F, #9281, b. circa 1160

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 24 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10781.htm#i107806

Agnes de Baudemont Countess of Braine1

F, #9282, b. circa 1130, d. circa 1202

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Robert I (?) Count of Dreux b. c 1123

  • Last Edited: 17 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I,_Count_of_Dreux.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10311.htm#i103110

Bernard I (?) Duke of Saxony1

M, #9283, b. circa 950, d. 9 February 1011

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Bernard I (?) Duke of Saxony was born circa 950 in Saxony, Germany*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Hildegard (?), daughter of Henry I the Bald (?) Count of Stade, circa 995 in Germany*.1
  • Death*: Bernard I (?) Duke of Saxony died on 9 February 1011 in Saxony, Germany*.1
  • Biography*: Bernard I (c. 950 – 9 February 1011) was the Duke of Saxony (973–1011), the second of the Billung dynasty, a son of Duke Herman and Oda. He extended his father's power considerably.

    He fought the Danes in 974, 983, and 994 during their invasions. He supported the succession of Otto III over Henry the Wrangler. In 986, he was made marshal and in 991 and 995 he joined the young Otto on campaign against the Slavs. He increased his power vis-à-vis the crown, where his father had been the representative of the king to the tribe, Bernard was the representative of the tribe to the king . Bernard died in 1011 and was buried in the Church of Saint Michael in Lüneburg.

    Family
    In 990, Bernard married Hildegard (died 1011), daughter of Henry I the Bald, Count of Stade (died 976). They had the following issue:
    Herman, died young
    Bernard II, his successor
    Thietmar, a count, died in a duel on 1 April 1048 in Pöhlde
    Gedesdiu (or Gedesti) (died 30 June c. 1040), abbess of Metelen (from 993) and Herford (from 1002)
    and probably:
    Matilda, nun
    Othelindis (died 9 March 1044), married Dirk III of Holland.1

Family: Hildegard (?) b. c 975, d. 1011

  • Last Edited: 28 Jul 2015

Hildegard (?)1

F, #9284, b. circa 975, d. 1011

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Bernard I (?) Duke of Saxony b. c 950, d. 9 Feb 1011

  • Last Edited: 24 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_I,_Duke_of_Saxony.

Henry I the Bald (?) Count of Stade1

M, #9285, b. circa 925, d. 976

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Henry I the Bald (?) Count of Stade was born circa 925 in Germany*.1
  • Death*: He died in 976 in Germany*.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Apr 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_I,_Duke_of_Saxony.

Charles VII (?) King of France1

M, #9289, b. 22 February 1403, d. 22 July 1461

Charles VII the Victorious

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Charles VII (?) King of France was born on 22 February 1403 in France.1
  • Death*: He died on 22 July 1461 in France at age 58.1
  • Biography*: Charles VII (22 February 1403 – 22 July 1461), called the Victorious (French: le Victorieux) or the Well-Served (French: le Bien-Servi), was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1422 to his death.

    In 1422, Charles VII inherited the throne of France under desperate circumstances. Forces of the Kingdom of England and Duke Philip III of Burgundy occupied Guyenne and northern France, including Paris, the most populous city, and Reims, the city in which the French kings were traditionally crowned. In addition, his father Charles VI the Mad had disinherited him in 1420 and recognized Henry V of England and his heirs as the legitimate successors of the French crown instead. At the same time, a civil war raged in France between the Armagnacs (supporters of the House of Valois) and the Burgundian party.

    With his court removed to Bourges, south of the Loire River, Charles was disparagingly called the “King of Bourges”, because the area around Bourges was one of the few remaining regions left to him. However, his political and military position improved dramatically with the emergence of Joan of Arc as a spiritual leader in France. Joan of Arc and other charismatic figures led French troops to several important victories that paved the way for the coronation of Charles VII in 1429 at Reims Cathedral. This long-awaited event boosted French morale as hostilities with England resumed. By 1453, the French had expelled the English from all their continental possessions except for the Pale of Calais.

    The last years of Charles VII were marked by conflicts with his turbulent son, the future Louis XI of France.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Charles VI (?) King of France1

M, #9290, b. 3 December 1368, d. 21 October 1422

Charles VI the Beloved

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Charles VI (?) King of France was born on 3 December 1368 in France.1
  • Death*: He died on 21 October 1422 in France at age 53.1
  • Biography*: Charles VI (3 December 1368 – 21 October 1422), called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) and the Mad (French: le Fol or le Fou), was King of France from 1380 to his death. He was a member of the House of Valois.

    Charles VI was only 11 when he inherited the throne in the midst of the Hundred Years' War. The government was entrusted to his four uncles: Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy; John, Duke of Berry; Louis I, Duke of Anjou; and Louis II, Duke of Bourbon. Although the royal age of majority was fixed at 14, the dukes maintained their grip on Charles until he took power at the age of 21.

    During the rule of his uncles, the financial resources of the kingdom, painstakingly built up by his father Charles V, were squandered for the personal profit of the dukes, whose interests were frequently divergent or even opposing. As royal funds drained, new taxes had to be raised, which caused several revolts.

    In 1388 Charles VI dismissed his uncles and brought back to power his father's former advisers, known as the Marmousets. Political and economic conditions in the kingdom improved significantly, and Charles earned the epithet "the Beloved". But in August 1392 en route to Brittany with his army in the forest of Le Mans, Charles suddenly went mad and slew four knights and almost killed his brother, Louis of Orléans.

    From then on, Charles' bouts of insanity became more frequent and of longer duration. During these attacks, he had delusions, believing he was made of glass or denying he had a wife and children. He could also attack servants or run until exhaustion, wailing that he was threatened by his enemies. Between crises, there were intervals of months during which Charles was relatively sane. However, unable to concentrate or make decisions, political power was taken away from him by the princes of the blood, which would cause much chaos and conflict in France.

    A fierce struggle for power developed between Louis of Orléans, the king's brother, and John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy, the son of Philip the Bold. When John instigated the murder of Louis in November 1407, the conflict degenerated into a civil war between the Armagnacs (supporters of the House of Valois) and the Burgundians. John offered large parts of France to King Henry V of England, who was still at war with the Valois monarchy, in exchange for his support. After the assassination of John the Fearless, his son Philip the Good led Charles the Mad to sign the infamous Treaty of Troyes (1420), which recognized Henry V as his legitimate successor on the throne of France and disinherited his own offspring.

    When Charles VI died, he was succeeded by his son Charles VII, who found the Valois cause in a desperate situation.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Charles V (?) King of France1

M, #9291, b. 21 January 1338, d. 16 September 1380

Charles V the Wise
King of France

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Charles V (?) King of France was born on 21 January 1338 in France.1
  • Death*: He died on 16 September 1380 in France at age 42.1
  • Biography*: Charles V (21 January 1338 – 16 September 1380), called the Wise (French: "le Sage"), was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1364 to his death.

    In 1349, as a young prince, Charles received from his grandfather King Philip VI the province of Dauphiné to rule. This allowed him to bear the title "Dauphin" until his coronation, which saw the integration of the Dauphiné into the crown lands of France. From this date, all heirs apparent of France bore the title of Dauphin until their coronation.

    Charles became regent of France when his father John II was captured by the English at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356. To pay the ransom, Charles had to raise taxes and deal with the hostility of the nobility, led by Charles the Bad, King of Navarre; the opposition of the French bourgeoisie, which was channeled through the Estates-General led by Etienne Marcel; and with peasant revolts known as Jacqueries. Charles overcame all of these rebellions, but in order to liberate his father, he had to conclude the Treaty of Brétigny in 1360, in which he abandoned large portions of south-western France to Edward III of England and agreed to pay a huge ransom.

    Charles became king in 1364. With the help of talented advisers known as the Marmousets, his skillful management of the kingdom allowed him to replenish the royal treasury and to restore the prestige of the House of Valois. He established the first permanent army paid with regular wages, which liberated the French populace from the companies of routiers who regularly plundered the country when not employed. Led by Bertrand du Guesclin, the French Army was able to turn the tide of the Hundred Years' War to Charles' advantage, and by the end of Charles' reign, they had reconquered almost all the territories ceded to the English in 1360. Furthermore, the French Navy, led by Jean de Vienne, managed to attack the English coast for the first time since the beginning of the Hundred Years' War.

    Charles V died in 1380. He was succeeded by his son Charles VI the Mad, whose disastrous reign allowed the English to regain control of large parts of France.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

John II (?) King of France1

M, #9292, b. 16 April 1319, d. 8 April 1364

John the Good

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John II (?) King of France was born on 16 April 1319 in France.1
  • Death*: He died on 8 April 1364 in France at age 44.1
  • Biography*: John II (16 April 1319 – 8 April 1364), or Jean II, also called John the Good (French: Jean le Bon), was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1350 until his death.

    When John II came to power, France was facing several disasters: the Black Death, which caused the death of nearly half of its population, free companies of routiers who plundered the country, and English aggression that resulted in disastrous military losses, including the Battle of Poitiers of 1356, in which John was captured.

    While John was a prisoner in London, his son Charles became regent and faced several rebellions, which he overcame. To liberate his father, he concluded the Treaty of Brétigny (1360), by which France lost many territories and paid an enormous ransom.

    In an exchange of hostages, including his son Louis, John was released from captivity to raise funds for his ransom. Upon his return in France, he created the franc to stabilize the currency and tried to get rid of the free companies by sending them to a crusade, but Pope Innocent VI died shortly before their meeting in Avignon. When John was informed that Louis had escaped from captivity, he voluntarily returned to England, where he died in 1364. He was succeeded by his son Charles V.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Philip VI (?) King of France1

M, #9293, b. 1293, d. 22 August 1350

Philip VI the Fortunate
King of France

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Philip VI (?) King of France was born in 1293 in France.1
  • Death*: He died on 22 August 1350 in France.1
  • Biography*: Philip VI (French: Philippe VI) (1293 – 22 August 1350), called the Fortunate (French: le Fortuné) and of Valois, was the first King of France from the House of Valois. He reigned from 1328 until his death.

    Philip's reign was dominated by the consequences of a succession dispute. When King Charles IV the Fair died without a male heir in 1328, the nearest male relative was his nephew Edward III of England, who inherited his claim through his mother Isabella of France, the sister of the dead king. It was held in France, however, that Edward was ineligible to inherit the French throne through the female line according to the ancient Salic Law. At first, Edward seemed to accept Philip's accession as the nearest male relative of Charles IV descended through the male line, however he pressed his claim to the throne of France after a series of disagreements with Philip. The result was the beginning of the Hundred Years' War in 1337.

    After initial successes at sea, Philip's navy was annihilated at the Battle of Sluys in 1340, ensuring that the war would occur on the continent. The English took another decisive advantage at the Battle of Crécy (1346), while the Black Death struck France, further destabilizing the country.

    In 1349, Philip VI bought the Dauphiné from its ruined ruler Humbert II and entrusted the government of this province to his grandson Charles. Philip VI died in 1350 and was succeeded by his son John II the Good.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Roger I de Tosny1

M, #9294, b. circa 1000, d. circa 1040

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Roger I de Tosny was born circa 1000 in Normandy, France*.1
  • Death*: He died circa 1040 in Normandy, France*.1
  • Biography*: Roger I of Tosny or Roger of Hispania (d. ca. 1040) was a Norman nobleman of the House of Tosny who took part in the Reconquista of Iberia.

    Career
    Roger was the son of Raoul I of Tosny, seigneur de Conches. In 1013, Roger and his father Raoul guarded the castle at Tillières for Richard II, Duke of Normandy. A few years later, for an unknown reason, the pair were forced into exile. While his father gained a reputation for himself in Apulia, Roger did the same in fighting the Muslims in Iberia. The small Christian states of Northern Iberia welcomed volunteers and adventurers who they could use to mount a strong force for the Reconquista. Roger was summoned by Ermesinde of Carcassonne, regent-countess of Barcelona after the death of her husband Ramon Borrell, to help her against the Muslim threat to her power. Roger rushed to help, marrying Ermesende's daughter, terrorising the Saracens and capturing several towns and castles. Adémar de Chabannes gives an echo of the more or less legendary deeds of Roger in Iberia. He gained the nickname Mangeur de Maures (Moor-Eater). Adémar recounts that Roger took his captured Saracens each day and, in front of them, cut one of their number in two, boiling the first half and giving it to the other Muslims to eat, and pretending to take the other half into his own tent for him and his companions to eat. Then Roger allowed some of these prisoners to escape, to spread these horrific rumours.

    Before 1024, Roger and his father gained permission from Richard II to return to Normandy, and Raoul died soon afterwards.

    Roger de Tosny founded Conches-en-Ouche. He built its church of Sainte-Foy (before 1026) then the abbey of Saint-Pierre de Castillon (c. 1035) where monks from Fécamp Abbey were installed. This monastery was one of the first baronial foundations in Normandy The foundation charter reveals that the lord of Tosny gave it a small possession around Conches and his forest.

    In 1035, Robert I's death began a troubled period in the duchy of Normandy. Civil wars multiplied and Roger (whose relations with his neighbours was already argumentative) was one of the main players in them. According to the Norman chroniclers, the lord of Tosny refused to serve the new duke, the future William the Conqueror, due to his being a bastard. He especially took advantage of the weakness of the duke's power by ravaging his neighbours' lands, notably those of Humphrey of Vieilles. Humphrey sent his son Roger to face Roger of Tosny, and around 1040 the latter was killed in battle, and his two eldest sons died a few weeks later of their wounds.

    Peace was re-established between the Tosny family and the neighbouring families. The widow Gotelina/Godehildis was forced to marry Richard, Count of Évreux.

    Family and descendants
    Married :
    Adelaide
    Godehildis who married, after the death of Roger de Tosny, Richard, Count of Évreux[3]
    Children :
    Helbert (died 1040 with his father),
    Elinand, (idem),
    Raoul II of Tosny, successor of his father
    Robert of Tosny, lord of Stafford
    Béranger l'Espagnol,
    Adelise, married Guillaume Fils Osbern
    Berthe, married Guy de Laval
    One other son.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

Raoul I de Tosny1

M, #9295, b. 975, d. after 1024

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

(?) Fitz Osbern the Steward1

M, #9296, b. circa 1000, d. 1040

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: (?) Fitz Osbern the Steward was born circa 1000 in Normandy, France*.1
  • Death*: He died in 1040 in Le Vaudreuil, France*; murdered while protecting the young Duke William.1
  • Biography*: Osbern the Steward, known in French as Osbern de Crépon († about 1040), was the Steward of two Dukes of Normandy and the father of William FitzOsbern, 1st Earl of Hereford, one of William the Conqueror's closest counsellors.

    Biography
    Osbern was the son of Herfast and the nephew of Gunnora, Duchess of Normandy, first the mistress and then second wife of Richard I of Normandy. Under Robert the Magnificent (1027–1035), he had the role of Steward or Seneschal. He kept this role after the Duke's death in 1035. He became one of the legal protectors of the young successor to the duchy, William the Bastard, known later as William the Conqueror, then aged 8.

    The young Duke William was in danger, as other members of the ducal family were trying to assassinate him to regain power in the duchy, and the Norman barons were rebelling. Osbern was murdered at Le Vaudreuil in the winter of 1040-1041, while protecting the young Duke in the child's bedroom. According to Guillaume de Jumièges, his throat was cut by William, son of Roger I of Montgomery. Barnon de Glos-la-Ferrières avenged the death of his lord by killing the murderer.

    Historians of the Normans disagree on the origin of the benefices held by Osbern, specifically which of them came from his father Herfast and which via his marriage to Emma, daughter of the powerful Count Rodulf of Ivry and sister of Hugues, Bishop of Bayeux. He possessed land widely spread across Normandy: in the Bessin at Crépon, at Hiémois (near Falaise, near the confluence of the rivers Seine and Andelle, around Cormeilles, in Talou, in Pays d'Ouche at Breteuil, and at La Neuve-Lyre.

    Family and descendants
    Osbern married Emma d'Ivry, daughter of Count Rodulf of Ivry,[3] who was half-brother of Richard I, Duke of Normandy. The children included?:
    William Fitz Osbern (ca 1020–1071), 1st Earl of Hereford?;
    Osbern FitzOsbern († end of 1103), Bishop of Exeter in 1072?.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Herfast (?)1

M, #9297, b. circa 975

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Herfast (?) was born circa 975 in France*.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Apr 2015

Elizabeth Keith1

F, #9298, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Adam Gordon of that Ilk b. c 1350, d. 1402

  • Last Edited: 5 Apr 2015

William Keith 1st Earl Marischal of Scotland1

M, #9299, b. circa 1325, d. 1463

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Keith 1st Earl Marischal of Scotland was born circa 1325 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Fraser circa 1350 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: William Keith 1st Earl Marischal of Scotland died in 1463 in Scotland.2

Family 1: Margaret Fraser b. c 1325

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 26 May 2015

Margaret Fraser1

F, #9300, b. circa 1325

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William Keith 1st Earl Marischal of Scotland b. c 1325, d. 1463

  • Last Edited: 5 Apr 2015