Gillicattan (?) 3rd Captain of Clan Chattan1

M, #9181, b. circa 1130, d. before 1153

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gillicattan (?) 3rd Captain of Clan Chattan was born circa 1130 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died before 1153 in Scotland.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 17 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505175
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505173
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505174

Diarmuid (?) 2nd Captain of Clan Chattan1

M, #9182, b. before 1090

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Diarmuid (?) 2nd Captain of Clan Chattan was born before 1090 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 17 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505173
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505172

"Mor" Gillicattan (?) 1st Captain of Clan Chattan1

M, #9183, b. circa 1050, d. circa 1090

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: "Mor" Gillicattan (?) 1st Captain of Clan Chattan was born circa 1050 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died circa 1090 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He held the position of 1st Captain of the Clan Chattan. The ‘duthus' of Gillichattan's race was the estate of Glenloy and Loch Arkaig where Torcastle was the Chief's seat. ‘He was Servant of St. Chattan' and had the galley coat-of-arms. The meaning of the ‘Servant of St. Chattan' is that Gillichattan was the baillie or temporal leader of the Abbey lands of Ardchattan. He was living between 1058 and 1090.1
  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50518.htm#i505172

Robert de Beaumont 3rd Earl of Leicester1

M, #9184, b. circa 1125, d. 1190

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Beaumont 3rd Earl of Leicester was born circa 1125 in England.1
  • Marriage*: He married Pernel Grandmesnil between 1155 and 1159 in England.3,2
  • Death*: Robert de Beaumont 3rd Earl of Leicester died in 1190 in returning from the third crusade, Dyrrachium, Albania*.2
  • Biography*: Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester (died 1190) was an English nobleman, one of the principal followers of Henry the Young King in the Revolt of 1173–1174 against his father Henry II. He is also called Robert Blanchemains (meaning "White Hands" in French).

    Life
    He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, a staunch supporter of Henry II, and he inherited from his father large estates in England and Normandy.
    When the revolt of the younger Henry broke out in April 1173, Robert went to his castle at Breteuil in Normandy. The rebels' aim was to take control of the duchy, but Henry II himself led an army to besiege the castle; Robert fled, and the Breteuil was taken on September 25 or 26.

    Robert apparently went to Flanders, where he raised a large force of mercenaries, and landed at Walton, Suffolk, on 29 September 1173. He joined forces with Hugh Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk, and the two marched west, aiming to cut England in two across the Midlands and to relieve the king's siege of Robert's castle at Leicester. However, they were intercepted by the king's supporters and defeated at the Battle of Fornham near Fornham, near Bury St Edmunds, on 17 October. Robert, along with his wife and many others, was taken prisoner. Henry II took away the earl's lands and titles as well.

    He remained in captivity until January 1177, well after most of the other prisoners had been released. The king was in a strong position and could afford to be merciful; not long after his release Robert's lands and titles were restored, but not his castles. All but two of his castles had been destroyed, and those two (Montsorrel in Leicestershire and Pacy in Normandy) remained in the king's hands.

    Robert had little influence in the remaining years of Henry II's reign, but was restored to favour by Richard I. He carried one of the swords of state at Richard's coronation in 1189. In 1190 Robert went on the third crusade to Palestine, but he died at Dyrrachium on his return journey.

    Family
    Robert married Petronilla, who was a daughter of William de Grandmesnil and great-granddaughter and eventual heiress to the English lands of Domesday baron, Hugh de Grandmesnil. They had five children:
    Robert, who succeeded his father as Earl of Leicester;
    Roger, who became Bishop of St Andrews in 1189;
    William, possibly the ancestor of the House of Hamilton;
    Amicia, who married Simon de Montfort, and whose son Simon subsequently became Earl of Leicester;
    Margaret, who married Saer de Quincy, later 1st Earl of Winchester.2

Family: Pernel Grandmesnil b. c 1139, d. 1 Apr 1212

  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1700.htm#i16995
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Beaumont,_3rd_Earl_of_Leicester.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1700.htm#i16996

Pernel Grandmesnil1

F, #9185, b. circa 1139, d. 1 April 1212

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Pernel Grandmesnil was also known as Petronilla Grandmesnil.1
  • Birth*: She was born circa 1139 in England.1
  • Marriage*: She married Robert de Beaumont 3rd Earl of Leicester, son of Robert de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester and Amicia de Montfort, between 1155 and 1159 in England.1,2
  • Married Name: As of between 1155 and 1159,her married name was de Beaumont.1
  • Death*: Pernel Grandmesnil died on 1 April 1212 in England.1
  • Biography*: Petronilla de Grandmesnil, Countess of Leicester (c. 1145 – 1212) was the wife of Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester, known as “Blanchmains” (d. 1190). After a long widowhood, she was buried in Leicester Abbey after her death on April 1, 1212.

    The chronicler Jordan Fantosme wrote that Earl Robert and his wife Petronilla were participants in the 1173–1174 rebellion of Henry "the Young King" against King Henry II, his father. Jordan claimed that Earl Robert participated because of grievances against King Henry and credits dismissive remarks about the English who were fighting on the king's side to the countess: "The English are great boasters, but poor fighters; they are better at quaffing great tankards and guzzling." Countess Petronilla accompanied her husband on his military campaign against English troops under the command of the earl of Arundel and Humphrey de Bohun. During the final showdown, she is said to have fled from the battle, only to be found in a ditch. "The earl’s wife wanted to drown herself, when Simon of Odell saw to pulling her out: ?My lady, come away from this place, and abandon your design! War is all a question of losing and winning." She was noted as wearing male armour when captured. Earl Robert was also captured and his holdings were confiscated. Countess Petronilla was released and during the earl's continued imprisonment he wrote to her asking that she discharge the bequests stated in his father's will.

    Family
    Petronilla claimed to be the heiress of the Grandmesnil barony, but the records do not record the names of her parents.[5] She married in the mid-1150s and bore at least seven children:
    William (d. before 1190)
    Robert de Beaumont, 4th Earl of Leicester, “FitzParnel/FitzPetronilla” (d. 1204) married Loretta de Braose
    Roger, Bishop of St. Andrews (d. 1202)
    Amice married (1) Simon de Montfort III (fr) (d. 18 July before 1188); parents of Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester
    (2) William de Barres (d. 3 Sept. 1215)
    Margaret married Saer de Quincy, later 1st Earl of Winchester
    Hawise, who became a nun at Nuneaton Priory
    Pernel/Petronilla
    Two additional children are possible: Geoffrey and Mabe.3
  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1700.htm#i16996
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Beaumont,_3rd_Earl_of_Leicester.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petronilla_de_Grandmesnil,_Countess_of_Leicester.

Robert de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester1

M, #9186, b. 1104, d. 5 April 1168

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester was born in 1104 in England.1
  • Marriage*: He married Amicia de Montfort, daughter of Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael and Emma of Hereford, circa 1125 in England.3
  • Death*: Robert de Beaumont 2nd Earl of Leicester died on 5 April 1168 in Brackley Castle, Northamptonshire, England.1
  • Biography*: Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester (1104 – 5 April 1168) was Justiciar of England 1155–1168.

    The surname "de Beaumont" is given him by genealogists. The only known contemporary surname applied to him is "Robert son of Count Robert". Henry Knighton, the fourteenth-century chronicler notes him as Robert "Le Bossu" (meaning "Robert the Hunchback" in French).

    Early life and education
    Robert was an English nobleman of Norman-French ancestry. He was the son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan and 1st Earl of Leicester, and Elizabeth de Vermandois, and the twin brother of Waleran de Beaumont. It is not known whether they were identical or fraternal twins, but the fact that they are remarked on by contemporaries as twins indicates that they were probably identical.

    The two brothers, Robert and Waleran, were adopted into the royal household shortly after their father's death in June 1118 (upon which Robert inherited his father's second titles of Earl of Leicester). Their lands on either side of the Channel were committed to a group of guardians, led by their stepfather, William, Earl of Warenne or Surrey. They accompanied King Henry I to Normandy, to meet with Pope Callixtus II in 1119, when the king incited them to debate philosophy with the cardinals. Both twins were literate, and Abingdon Abbey later claimed to have been Robert's school, but though this is possible, its account is not entirely trustworthy. A surviving treatise on astronomy (British Library ms Royal E xxv) carries a dedication "to Earl Robert of Leicester, that man of affairs and profound learning, most accomplished in matters of law" who can only be this Robert. On his death he left his own psalter to the abbey he founded at Leicester, which was still in its library in the late fifteenth century. The existence of this indicates that like many noblemen of his day, Robert followed the canonical hours in his chapel.

    Career at the Norman court
    In 1120 Robert was declared of age and inherited most of his father's lands in England, while his twin brother took the French lands. However in 1121, royal favour brought Robert the great Norman honors of Breteuil and Pacy-sur-Eure, with his marriage to Amice de Gael, daughter of a Breton intruder the king had forced on the honor after the forfeiture of the Breteuil family in 1119. Robert spent a good deal of his time and resources over the next decade integrating the troublesome and independent barons of Breteuil into the greater complex of his estates. He did not join in his brother's great Norman rebellion against King Henry I in 1123–24. He appears fitfully at the royal court despite his brother's imprisonment until 1129. Thereafter the twins were frequently to be found together at Henry I's court.

    Robert held lands throughout the country. In the 1120s and 1130s he tried to rationalise his estates in Leicestershire. Leicestershire estates of the See of Lincoln and the Earl of Chester were seized by force. This enhanced the integrity of Robert's block of estates in the central midlands, bounded by Nuneaton, Loughborough, Melton Mowbray and Market Harborough.

    In 1135, the twins were present at King Henry's deathbed. Robert's actions in the succession period are unknown, but he clearly supported his brother's decision to join the court of the new king Stephen before Easter 1136. During the first two years of the reign Robert is found in Normandy fighting rival claimants for his honor of Breteuil. Military action allowed him to add the castle of Pont St-Pierre to his Norman estates in June 1136 at the expense of one of his rivals. From the end of 1137 Robert and his brother were increasingly caught up in the politics of the court of King Stephen in England, where Waleran secured an ascendancy which lasted till the beginning of 1141. Robert participated in his brother's political coup against the king's justiciar, Roger of Salisbury (the Bishop of Salisbury).

    Civil war in England
    The outbreak of civil war in England in September 1139 brought Robert into conflict with Earl Robert of Gloucester, the bastard son of Henry I and principal sponsor of the Empress Matilda. His port of Wareham and estates in Dorset were seized by Gloucester in the first campaign of the war. In that campaign the king awarded Robert the city and castle of Hereford as a bid to establish the earl as his lieutenant in Herefordshire, which was in revolt. It is disputed by scholars whether this was an award of a second county to Earl Robert. Probably in late 1139, Earl Robert refounded his father's collegiate church of St Mary de Castro in Leicester as a major Augustinian abbey on the meadows outside the town's north gate, annexing the college's considerable endowment to the abbey.

    The battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 saw the capture and imprisonment of King Stephen. Although Count Waleran valiantly continued the royalist fight in England into the summer, he eventually capitulated to the Empress and crossed back to Normandy to make his peace with the Empress's husband, Geoffrey of Anjou. Earl Robert had been in Normandy since 1140 attempting to stem the Angevin invasion, and negotiated the terms of his brother's surrender. He quit Normandy soon after and his Norman estates were confiscated and used to reward Norman followers of the Empress. Earl Robert remained on his estates in England for the remainder of King Stephen's reign. Although he was a nominal supporter of the king, there seems to have been little contact between him and Stephen, who did not confirm the foundation of Leicester Abbey till 1153. Earl Robert's principal activity between 1141 and 1149 was his private war with Ranulf II, Earl of Chester. Though details are obscure it seems clear enough that he waged a dogged war with his rival that in the end secured him control of northern Leicestershire and the strategic Chester castle of Mountsorrel. When Earl Robert of Gloucester died in 1147, Robert of Leicester led the movement among the greater earls of England to negotiate private treaties to establish peace in their areas, a process hastened by the Empress's departure to Normandy, and complete by 1149. During this time the earl also exercised supervision over his twin brother's earldom of Worcester, and in 1151 he intervened to frustrate the king's attempts to seize the city.

    Earl Robert and Henry Plantagenet
    The arrival in England of Duke Henry, son of the Empress Mathilda, in January 1153 was a great opportunity for Earl Robert. He was probably in negotiation with Henry in that spring and reached an agreement by which he would defect to him by May 1153, when the duke restored his Norman estates to the earl. The duke celebrated his Pentecost court at Leicester in June 1153, and he and the earl were constantly in company till the peace settlement between the duke and the king at Winchester in November 1153. Earl Robert crossed with the duke to Normandy in January 1154 and resumed his Norman castles and honors. As part of the settlement his claim to be chief steward of England and Normandy was recognised by Henry.

    Earl Robert began his career as chief justiciar of England probably as soon as Duke Henry succeeded as King Henry II in October 1154. The office gave the earl supervision of the administration and legal process in England whether the king was present or absent in the realm. He appears in that capacity in numerous administrative acts, and had a junior colleague in the post in Richard de Luci, another former servant of King Stephen. The earl filled the office for nearly fourteen years until his death, and earned the respect of the emerging Angevin bureaucracy in England. His opinion was quoted by learned clerics, and his own learning was highly commended.

    He died on 5 April 1168, probably at his Northamptonshire castle of Brackley, for his entrails were buried at the hospital in the town. He was received as a canon of Leicester on his deathbed, and buried to the north of the high altar of the great abbey he had founded and built. He left a written testament of which his son the third earl was an executor, as we learn in a reference dating to 1174.

    Church patronage
    Robert founded and patronised many religious establishments. He founded Leicester Abbey and Garendon Abbeyin Leicestershire, the Fontevraldine Nuneaton Priory in Warwickshire, Luffield Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and the hospital of Brackley, Northamptonshire. He refounded the collegiate church of St Mary de Castro, Leicester, as a dependency of Leicester abbey around 1164, after suppressing it in 1139. Around 1139 he refounded the collegiate church of Wareham as a priory of his abbey of Lyre, in Normandy. His principal Norman foundations were the priory of Le Désert in the forest of Breteuil and a major hospital in Breteuil itself. He was a generous benefactor of the Benedictine abbey of Lyre, the oldest monastic house in the honor of Breteuil. He also donated land in Old Dalby, Leicestershire to the Knights Hospitallers who used it to found Dalby Preceptory.

    Family and children
    He married after 1120 Amice de Montfort, daughter of Raoul II de Montfort, himself a son of Ralph de Gael, Earl of East Anglia. Both families had lost their English inheritances through rebellion in 1075. They had four children:
    Hawise de Beaumont, who married William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester and had descendants.
    Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester who married Petronilla de Grandmesnil and had descendants.
    Isabel, who married: Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Huntingdon and had descendants.
    Margaret, who married Ralph V de Toeni and had descendants.1

Family: Amicia de Montfort b. b 1096, d. c 31 Aug 1168

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Beaumont,_3rd_Earl_of_Leicester.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10681.htm#i106807
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1700.htm#i16995

Amicia de Montfort1

F, #9187, b. before 1096, d. circa 31 August 1168

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1700.htm#i16995
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p381.htm#i3807
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_de_Gael

Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester1

M, #9188, b. between 1040 and 1050, d. 5 June 1118

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester was born between 1040 and 1050 in France*.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Elizabeth de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh de Crepi Comte de Vermandois et de Valois and Aelis de Vermandois Comtesse de Vermandois, circa 1104 in England.1
  • Death*: Robert de Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester died on 5 June 1118 in England.3
  • Biography*: Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (1040/1050-5 June 1118) was a powerful Norman nobleman, one of the Companions of William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest of England, and was revered as one of the wisest men of his age. Chroniclers spoke highly of his eloquence, his learning, and three kings of England valued his counsel.

    Origins
    He was born between 1040-1050, the eldest son of Roger de Beaumont (1015-1094) by his wife Adeline of Meulan (died 1081), a daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan, and was an older brother of Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c. 1050-1119)

    Fights at Battle of Hastings
    Robert de Beaumont was one of only about 15 of the Proven Companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, and was leader of the infantry on the right wing of the Norman army, as evidenced in the following near contemporary account by William of Poitiers:
    "A certain Norman, Robert, son of Roger of Beaumont, being nephew and heir to Henry, Count of Meulan, through Henry's sister Adeline, found himself that day in battle for the first time. He was as yet but a young man and he performed feats of valour worthy of perpetual remembrance. At the head of a troop which he commanded on the right wing he attacked with the utmost bravery and success".

    His service earned him the grant of more than 91 English manors confiscated from the defeated English, as listed in the Domesday Book of 1086.

    Inheritance
    When his mother died in 1081, Robert inherited the title of Count of Meulan in Normandy, and the title, Viscount Ivry and Lord of Norton. He paid homage to King Philip I of France for these estates and sat as a French Peer in the Parliament held at Poissy.

    Career
    He and his brother Henry were members of the Royal hunting party in the New Forest in Hampshire when King William II Rufus (1087-1100) was shot dead accidentally by an arrow on 2 August 1100. He pledged allegiance to William II's brother, King Henry I (1100-1135), who created him Earl of Leicester in 1107.

    Loss of Normandy lands
    On the death of William Rufus, William, Count of Évreux and Ralph de Conches made an incursion into Robert's Norman estates, on the pretence they had suffered injury through some advice that Robert had given to the king; their raid was successful and they collected a vast booty.

    Marriage and progeny
    In 1096 he married Elizabeth (or Isabel) de Vermandois, daughter of Hugh Magnus (1053-1101) a younger son of the French king and Adelaide, Countess of Vermandois (1050-1120). After his death Isabella remarried in 1118 to William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. He had the following progeny:

    Sons
    Waleran IV de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1st Earl of Worcester (b. 1104), eldest twin and heir.
    Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester & Earl of Hereford (b. 1104), twin
    Hugh de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Bedford (b. circa 1106)

    Daughters
    Emma de Beaumont (born 1102)
    Adeline de Beaumont, married twice:
    Hugh IV of Montfort-sur-Risle;
    Richard de Granville of Bideford (d. 1147)
    Aubree de Beaumont, married Hugh II of Châteauneuf-Thimerais.
    Agnes de Beaumont, a nun
    Maud de Beaumont, married William Lovel. (b. c. 1102)
    Isabel de Beaumont, a mistress of King Henry I. Married twice:
    Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke;
    Hervé de Montmorency, Constable of Ireland

    Death
    According to Henry of Huntingdon, Robert died of shame after "a certain earl carried off the lady he had espoused, either by some intrigue or by force and stratagem." He was the last surviving Norman nobleman to have fought in the Battle of Hastings.3

Family: Elizabeth de Vermandois b. c 1085, d. 17 Feb 1131

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

Roger de Beaumont Seigneur of Beaumont-le-Roger1

M, #9189, b. circa 1015, d. 29 November 1094

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Roger de Beaumont Seigneur of Beaumont-le-Roger was born circa 1015 in Normandy, France*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Adeline (?) of Meulan, daughter of Waleran III (?) Count of Meulan and Aubreye (?), circa 1040 in France*.1
  • Death*: Roger de Beaumont Seigneur of Beaumont-le-Roger died on 29 November 1094 in France*.1
  • Biography*: Roger de Beaumont (c. 1015 – 29 November 1094), feudal lord (French: seigneur) of Beaumont-le-Roger and of Pont-Audemer in Normandy, was a powerful Norman nobleman and close advisor to William the Conqueror.

    Origins
    He was a son of Humphrey de Vieilles (who was a great-nephew of the Duchess Gunnora of Normandy) by his wife Albreda de la Haye Auberie. Roger de Beaumont was thus a second cousin once removed of William the Conqueror. His Norman feudal lordship had its caput and castle at Beaumont-le-Roger, a settlement situated on the upper reaches of the River Risle, in Normandy, about 46 km SW of Rouen, the capital of the Duchy. He was also feudal lord of Pont-Audemer, a settlement built around the first bridge to cross the River Risle upstream of its estuary, shared with the River Seine.

    Physical appearance
    Roger was nicknamed La Barbe (Latinised to Barbatus) (i.e. "The Bearded") because he wore a moustache and beard while the Normans usually were clean shaven. This peculiarity is believed to be recognized in the thirty-second panel of the Bayeux Tapestry where he is depicted sitting at a feast near Hastings, well before the battle, at the right hand of Duke William, who in turn was seated at the right hand of his brother Bishop Odo of Bayeux, who is shown blessing the food at a feast.

    Career
    Planché described him as "the noblest, the wealthiest, and the most valiant seigneur of Normandy, and the greatest and most trusted friend of the Danish (i.e. Norman) family". The explanation for his exalted position appears to be that as an older cousin who had never rebelled against the young Duke, he was part of the kinship group of noblemen that William relied upon in governing Normandy and fighting-off frequent rebellion and invasions. The historian Frank McLynn observed that William relied heavily on relatives on his mother's side, namely his half-brothers Bishop Odo and Robert, and brothers-in-law, and on relatives descended from the Duchess Gunnora's sisters, since his own paternal kin had proved unreliable.

    Wace, the 12th century historian, wrote that: "At the time of the invasion of England, Roger was summoned to the great council at Lillebonne, on account of his wisdom; but he did not join in the expedition as he was too far advanced in years". Although Roger could not fight, he did not hesitate in contributing a large share of the cost, and provided at his own expense sixty vessels for the conveyance of the troops across the channel. Furthermore, his eldest son and heir fought bravely at Hastings as noted in several contemporary records. As a result, Roger's elder sons were rewarded generously with lands in England, and both eventually were made English earls by the sons of the Conqueror. Wace's statement may therefore cast doubt on the possibility of Roger being depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry feasting at Hastings. However it is possible that he crossed the Channel so he could continue to act as a valued member of the Duke's council, perhaps giving advice on military tactics, yet stayed well behind the line of battle at headquarters.

    Marriage & progeny
    He married circa 1048 or earlier Adeline of Meulan (c. 1014-1020 - 8 April 1081), who was buried at the Abbaye du Bec, the daughter of Waleran III, Count de Meulan by Oda de Conteville, and sister and heiress of a childless Count of Meulan. Meulan eventually passed to their elder son who became Count of Meulan in 1081. Their surviving children were:
    Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan (c.1049-1118), the eldest son and heir. He succeeded his father in the major part of his lands, and was one of the few proven Companions of William the Conqueror who fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
    Henry de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Warwick (c.1050-1119). He was overshadowed by his elder brother, but was granted by his father one of his lesser lordships in Normandy, the lordship of Le Neubourg, about 12 km NE of Beaumont-le-Roger, from which his own family adopted the surname Anglicised to "de Newburgh". He established a more enduring line of Beaumont earls than his elder brother, Earls of Warwick seated at Warwick Castle.
    William de Beaumont (not mentioned in most sources).
    Alberée de Beaumont (died 1112), Abbess of Eton.

    Death & burial
    He was buried at Les Préaux.1

Family: Adeline (?) of Meulan b. bt 1014 - 1020, d. 8 Apr 1081

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Adeline (?) of Meulan1

F, #9190, b. between 1014 and 1020, d. 8 April 1081

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Roger de Beaumont Seigneur of Beaumont-le-Roger b. c 1015, d. 29 Nov 1094

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Waleran III (?) Count of Meulan1

M, #9191

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Aubreye (?) b. c 1000

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p382.htm#i3812

Aubreye (?)1

F, #9192, b. circa 1000

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Waleran III (?) Count of Meulan

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p382.htm#i3812

Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael1,2

M, #9193, b. before 1042, d. circa 1096

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael was born before 1042 in Hertfordshire, England.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Emma of Hereford, daughter of William Fitz Osbern Lord of Breteuil & 1st Earl of Hereford and Adelise de Tosny, before 1096 in Hertfordshire, England.3
  • Death*: Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael died circa 1096 in on the road to Palestine.3
  • Biography*: Ralph de Gaël (otherwise Ralph de Guader, Radulf Waders or Ralph Wader) (before 1042 – c. 1096) was the Earl of East Anglia (Norfolk and Suffolk) and Lord of Gaël and Montfort (Seigneur de Gaël et Montfort). He was the leading figure in the Revolt of the Earls, the last serious revolt against William the Bastard.

    Birth
    Ralph was born before 1042, most probably about 1040 in Hereford, as not later than 1060 he attested, in company with other Bretons, a notification at Angers as son of Ralph the Staller.

    Inheritances
    He inherited the great Breton barony of Gaël, which comprised more than forty parishes. In England, whether by inheritance or by grant from the Crown, he held large estates in Norfolk, as well as property in Suffolk, Essex, Hertford, and possibly other counties. In some of these estates he certainly succeeded his father, but it is not known whether he obtained the Earldom immediately on his father’s death.

    Up to 1074
    In 1065 he was with Conan II, Duke of Brittany when he besieged Rivallon I of Dol, Lord of Dol, in the castle of Combourg.

    In 1066 he fought on the Norman side at the Battle of Hastings.

    In February or March 1068 he was present at William the Conqueror’s court with his father.

    In 1069 he routed a force of Norsemen which had invaded Norfolk and occupied Norwich. It may been in recognition of this exploit (or of services rendered at Hastings) that the Conqueror created him Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, or the East Angles, the Earldom being also styled, from its capital, of Norwich.

    It is presumably this Ralph who, on 13 April 1069 was with the King at Winchester and witnessed, as Earl Ralph, a diploma in favour of St.Denis of Paris and in the same year witnessed, as Earl Ralph, a grant in favour of the Bishop of Essex.

    1074- It is possible that Ralph defended Dol when the Conqueror besieged it unsuccessfully in 1074, although it is more likely that Ralph was in Dol during the revolts against Hoel II, Duke of Brittany and that William came to Dol in defense of Hoel.

    Ralph built a church in Norwich, in the new town, and give it to his chaplains; but there is no record of religious benefactions by him in Brittany.

    Marriage
    He married, in 1075 at Exning, Cambridgeshire, Emma, only daughter of William FitzOsbern, 1st Earl of Hereford and his first wife Alice or Adelise (or Adelissa), daughter of Roger I of Tosny. Their offspring were:
    William de Gael, succeeded his father as Seigneur de Gael. He claimed Breteuil after the death of his uncle William de Breteuil, but died shortly thereafter, according to Orderic Vitalis.
    Raoul II de Gael, seigneur of Gael and Montfort. By 1119, he had obtained the honour of Breteuil in Normandy (his uncle William de Breteuil died 1103 without any legitimate issue). The Complete Peerage claims that his descendants in the male line continued to hold his estates in Brittany, acquiring Laval and Vitré in the 15th century with the marriage of the heiress of Montmorency-Laval, but such a male-line descent hasn't been traced. He had only one child by his wife, whose name is unknown.

    Amice (Amicia) (d. c. 31 August 1168) was initially betrothed to Richard, illegitimate son of Henry I and his mistress Ansfrida, but her betrothed died on the White Ship in November 1120. She was then married to the King's ward Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, second (twin) son of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan.
    Alain de Gael, who went with his parents on the First Crusade and died in the Holy Land.

    Revolt of the Earls
    In 1075 the king's refusal to sanction this marriage between two powerful families caused a revolt in his absence. The leaders were Ralph, his new brother-in-law Roger de Breteuil, 2nd Earl of Hereford, and Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northumberland. The revolt was plagued by disaster. Waltheof lost heart and confessed the conspiracy to Lanfranc, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who urged Earl Roger to return to his allegiance, and finally excommunicated him and his adherents- Waltheof was later executed by William. Ralph encountered a much superior force under the warrior bishops Odo of Bayeux and Geoffrey de Montbray (the latter ordered that all rebels should have their right foot cut off) near Cambridge and retreated hurriedly to Norwich, hotly pursued by the royal army. Leaving his wife to defend Norwich Castle, he sailed for Denmark in search of help, and eventually returned to England with a fleet of 200 ships under Cnut and Hakon, which failed to do anything effective.

    Meanwhile the Countess held out in Norwich until she obtained terms for herself and her followers, who were deprived of their lands, but allowed forty days to leave the realm. Thereupon the Countess retired to her estate in Brittany, where she was rejoined by her husband. Ralph was deprived of all his lands and of his Earldom. At the time of his revolt, he was a land-holder in Whaddon, Cambridgeshire. This is according to the Domesday Book, which uses the name of Radulf[us] Waders.

    Ralph, formerly Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk (East Anglia) and his Countess Emma retired to her Breton lands. They left for the Holy Land, joining Robert, Duke of Normandy, on the First Crusade, and died circa 1101.

    Baron of Brittany
    For the rest of his life he remained a great baron of Brittany, with no interests in England. In 1076, having plotted against Hoel II, Duke of Brittany, he was besieged at Dol, and the Conqueror came to Hoel's aid; but Ralph finally made his peace.

    In 1089 he attested the judgment in a dispute between the monks of Redon Abbey and the chaplains of the Duke of Brittany. He also attested a charter of Alan IV, Duke of Brittany, in favour of St.Georges at Rennes (1084-1096). The Conqueror being dead, Ralph appears in Normandy c.1093 as a witness in the record of a suit between the abbots of Lonlay and St.Florent. There is, however, no record of religious benefactions by him in Brittany.

    Crusade
    In 1096, accompanied by his wife and under Robert Curthose, he went on Crusade. He was one of the Breton leaders who took part in the siege of Nicaea, after which he joined Bohemund I of Antioch’s division of the army.

    Both Ralph and his wife Emma died on the road to Palestine in the course of the Crusade.3

Family: Emma of Hereford b. b 1071

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

Emma of Hereford1

F, #9194, b. before 1071

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Emma of Hereford was born before 1071 in Herefordshire, England.1
  • Marriage*: She married Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael before 1096 in Hertfordshire, England.1
  • Married Name: As of before 1096,her married name was de Montfort.1
  • Biography*: Emma de Guader was the wife of Ralph de Guader and the daughter of William FitzOsbern, Lord of Breteuil and later first Earl of Hereford of a new creatin, who was a cousin and close adviser of William the Conqueror. William's opposition to their marriage led to the unsuccessful Revolt of the Earls.

    Life
    Emma was born to William Fitz-Osbern and his wife Adeliza, the daughter of Roger I of Tosny and his wife Adelaide (descendant from the County of Barcelona). She was born in or around 1059 in Breteuil in Normandy. In 1075, Emma, Countess of Norfolk defended Norwich Castle when it was under siege. She eventually negotiated safe passage for herself and her troops in exchange for her castle.[citation needed] Emma died some time after 1096 on the road to Palestine during the First Crusade with her husband.

    Emma's daughter, Amice, married Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester.4

Family: Ralph de Montfort Seigneur de Montfort et Gael b. b 1042, d. c 1096

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

David Ogilvy of Balmuto1

M, #9195, b. circa 1400, d. before 1440

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Christian Glen b. c 1400

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p46350.htm#i463495
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2040.htm#i20391

Christian Glen1

F, #9196, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: David Ogilvy of Balmuto b. c 1400, d. b 1440

  • Last Edited: 18 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p46350.htm#i463495
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p247.htm#i2465

Sir Alexander Ogilvy of Auchterhouse1

M, #9197, b. circa 1380, d. between 14 July 1421 and 2 October 1423

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Alexander Ogilvy of Auchterhouse was born circa 1380 in Auchterhouse, Angus, Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died between 14 July 1421 and 2 October 1423 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He fought in the Battle of Harlow. He lived at Auchterhouse, Angus, Scotland. He held the office of Sheriff of Angus between 1403 and 1423.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2040.htm#i20391
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p291.htm#i2908

Sir Walter Ogilvy of Auchterhouse1

M, #9198, b. circa 1360, d. 1392

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Isabel Ramsay b. c 1360

  • Last Edited: 21 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p291.htm#i2908
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2916
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p246.htm#i2460

Isabel Ramsay1

F, #9199, b. circa 1360

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Walter Ogilvy of Auchterhouse b. c 1360, d. 1392

  • Last Edited: 21 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p291.htm#i2908
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p291.htm#i2910
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p246.htm#i2460

Walter Ogilvy of Wester Powrie & Auchterhouse1

M, #9200, b. circa 1330

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Walter Ogilvy of Wester Powrie & Auchterhouse was born circa 1330 in Auchterhouse, Angus, Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He lived at Wester Powrie. He held the office of Hereditary Sheriff of Forfar circa 1365, inherited from his uncle, Sir Malcolm Ramsay.1
  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2916
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2918

Majory Ramsay of Auchterhouse1

F, #9201, b. circa 1330

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2916
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2918

Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Wester Powrie1

M, #9202, b. circa 1310

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family 2: Majory Ramsay of Auchterhouse b. c 1330

  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p292.htm#i2918
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p46614.htm#i466133

Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Wester Powrie1

M, #9203, b. before 1280

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Patrick Ogilvy of Wester Powrie was born before 1280 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: In 1309 He had a charter of Kettins in Forfarshire from King Robert I Bruce.1
  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p46614.htm#i466133

Andrew Abercrombie of Innerpeffray1

M, #9204, b. circa 1450

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p55588.htm#i555871

John Kennedy 2nd Lord Kennedy1

M, #9205, b. 22 October 1451, d. 29 December 1508

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John Kennedy 2nd Lord Kennedy was born on 22 October 1451 in Scotland.1,4
  • Death*: He died on 29 December 1508 in Scotland at age 57.4
  • Biography*: John Kennedy, PC, 2nd Lord Kennedy (b. 22 Oct 1451 d. 29 Dec 1508) was a Scottish lord, the son of Gilbert Kennedy, 1st Lord Kennedy and Catherine Maxwell. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Lord Kennedy in 1479 after the death of his father. He was a Commissioner to treat with the English in 1484. He was invested as a Privy Counsellor (P.C.) in Scotland to King James III of Scotland.

    Family
    John Kennedy married three times:
    His first wife was Elizabeth Montgomerie, daughter of Alexander Montgomerie, 1st Lord Montgomerie and Margaret Boyd, whom he married before 25 March 1460. By her he had three daughters and a son, David Kennedy, 1st Earl of Cassillis (b. bef. 1478-1513).

    His second wife was Lady Elizabeth Gordon, daughter of Alexander Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly and Elizabeth Crichton, whom he married between 24 August 1467 and 12 August 1471. By her he had three sons and four daughters, including Janet Kennedy (b. bef. 1483-1543) and Margaret Kennedy, wife of Andrew Stewart.

    His third wife whom he married after 1500 was called Elizabeth.4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p55587.htm#i555869
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2150.htm#i21499
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Kennedy,_1st_Lord_Kennedy.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Kennedy,_2nd_Lord_Kennedy.

Gilbert Kennedy 1st Lord Kennedy1

M, #9206, b. 22 February 1405, d. 27 March 1489

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gilbert Kennedy 1st Lord Kennedy was born on 22 February 1405 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Catherine Maxwell, daughter of Herbert Maxwell 1st Lord Maxwell and (?) Herries of Terregles, circa 1450 in Scotland.3,4
  • Death*: Gilbert Kennedy 1st Lord Kennedy died on 27 March 1489 in Scotland at age 84.3
  • Biography*: Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure, 1st Lord Kennedy (b. 22 Feb 1405, d. 27 March 1489) was a Scottish lord, a son of Sir James Kennedy "the Younger" of Dunure, the Younger, and Lady Mary Stewart, daughter of Robert III, King of the Scots. He served as one of six Regents during the early reign of James III of Scotland, after the 1460 death of James II.

    Personal life
    Gilbert married Catherine Maxwell, daughter of Herbert Maxwell, 1st Lord Maxwell.
    John Kennedy, 2nd Lord Kennedy, father of David Kennedy, 1st Earl of Cassilis.
    Catherine Kennedy, mother of Hugh Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Eglinton.
    He married, secondly, Isabel Ogilvy, daughter of Sir Walter Ogilvy of Lintrathen and Isabel Glen, after 1460.

    Offices and titles
    Kennedy, created 1st Lord of Kennedy between 27 March 1457 and 20 March 1458, in addition held the office of Keeper of the Castle of Lochdoun and the office of Constable of Stirling Castle, bestowed upon him in 1466. By that time, he was already Regent of Scotland, having secured the position on the death of James II.3

Family: Catherine Maxwell b. c 1425

  • Last Edited: 13 Jun 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2150.htm#i21499
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10823.htm#i108224
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Kennedy,_1st_Lord_Kennedy.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10823.htm#i108227

Catherine Maxwell1

F, #9207, b. circa 1425

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Gilbert Kennedy 1st Lord Kennedy b. 22 Feb 1405, d. 27 Mar 1489

  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Kennedy,_1st_Lord_Kennedy.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p522.htm#i5212
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p244.htm#i2439
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10823.htm#i108227

Sir James Kennedy of Dunure, Younger1

M, #9208, b. circa 1380, d. before 8 November 1408

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Lady Mary Stewart b. c 1380

  • Last Edited: 24 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10823.htm#i108224
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2448.htm#i24475
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p244.htm#i2432
  4. [S922] David Malcolm, Genealogical Memoir of the House of Drummond, page 37.

Sir Gilbert Kennedy of Dunure1

M, #9210, b. circa 1350, d. after 8 November 1408

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Agnes Maxwell b. b 1358

  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2448.htm#i24475
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p244.htm#i2434
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p244.htm#i2432
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p244.htm#i2431