Robert Stewart of Innermeath and Lorn, 1st Lord Innermeath1,2

M, #9092, b. 1379, d. before 1449

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert Stewart of Innermeath and Lorn, 1st Lord Innermeath was born in 1379 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Stewart of Albany & Fife in 1398 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Robert Stewart of Innermeath and Lorn, 1st Lord Innermeath died before 1449 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Lord Innermeath is an extinct title in the Peerage of Scotland created circa 1471 for Walter Stewart, 1st Lord Innermeath.

    Stewart had previously been Lord of Lorne, but resigned that title in favour of Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll. The fifth Lord Innermeath was further ennobled as the Earl of Atholl in 1596, but both titles became extinct upon the death of James Stewart, 2nd Earl of Atholl and 7th Lord Innermeath.2

Family: Margaret Stewart of Albany & Fife b. 1375, d. 1439

  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Innermeath

Margaret Stewart of Albany & Fife1

F, #9093, b. 1375, d. 1439

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

James Douglas 2nd Lord Dalkeith1

M, #9094, b. circa 1400, d. 1457

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: James Douglas 2nd Lord Dalkeith was born circa 1400 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Elizabeth Gifford circa 1426 in Scotland.1,3
  • Death*: James Douglas 2nd Lord Dalkeith died in 1457 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: James, 2nd Lord Dalkeith, married Elizabeth, daughter of James Gifford of Sherififhall ; but having become insane during his father's lifetime, upon his succeeding in 1441, the King appointed James Gifford, Lady Dalkeith's brother, his curator for nineteen years, with full powers to administer the estates and to collect the rents. By the same instrument Gifford was constituted constable of Dalkeith Castle, a stronghold of considerable importance to that party in the kingdom which should hold it in those days of dissension. Consequently King James's Government spent considerable sums in repairs and upkeep during the tutelary of Gifford, the bills for iron, Prussian timber, etc., amounting to £122, 15s. 5d. during the years 1444-1445.4

Family: Elizabeth Gifford b. c 1399, d. 1465

  • Last Edited: 6 Dec 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S1164] Herbert Eustace, Sir Maxwell, A history of the house of Douglas, page 236-7 (296-7).
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Innermeath
  4. [S1164] Herbert Eustace, Sir Maxwell, A history of the house of Douglas, page 237 (297).

Elizabeth Gifford1

F, #9095, b. circa 1399, d. 1465

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: James Douglas 2nd Lord Dalkeith b. c 1400, d. 1457

  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Innermeath

James I Stewart King of Scots1

M, #9096, b. December 1394, d. 21 February 1437

James I
King of Scots

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: James I Stewart King of Scots was born in December 1394 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Joan Beaufort, daughter of John de Beaufort 1st Earl of Somerset and Lady Margaret de Holand, on 2 February 1423 in St. Mary, Overy, Southwark, Surrey, England.1
  • Death*: James I Stewart King of Scots died on 21 February 1437 in Perth, Perthshire, Scotland, at age 42.1
  • Biography*: James I (late July 1394 – 21 February 1437), King of Scotland from 1406, was the son of King Robert III and Annabella Drummond. He was the last of three sons and by the time he was eight both of his elder brothers were dead—Robert had died in infancy but David, Duke of Rothesay died suspiciously in Falkland Castle while being detained by his uncle, Robert, Duke of Albany. Although parliament exonerated Albany, fears for James's safety grew during the winter of 1405–6 and plans were made to send him to France. In February 1406, James was accompanying nobles close to his father when they clashed with supporters of Archibald, 4th Earl of Douglas, forcing the prince to take refuge in the castle of the Bass Rock, a small islet in the Firth of Forth. He remained there until mid-March, when he boarded a vessel bound for France, but on 22 March while off the English coast, pirates captured the ship and delivered James to Henry IV of England. Two weeks later, on 4 April the ailing Robert III died, and the 12-year-old uncrowned King of Scots began his 18-year detention.

    James was given a good education at the English court, where he developed respect for English methods of governance and for Henry V to the extent that he served in the English army against the French during 1420–1. The Scottish king's cousin Murdoch Stewart, Albany's son, a captive in England since 1402 was traded for Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland in 1416. Eight more years passed before James was ransomed by which time Murdoch had succeeded his father to the dukedom and the governorship of Scotland. James married Joan Beaufort, daughter of the Earl of Somerset in February 1424 shortly before his release in April when they journeyed to Scotland. This was not altogether a popular re-entry to Scottish affairs, since James had fought on behalf of Henry V and at times against Scottish forces in France. Noble families would now not only have to pay increased taxes to cover the £40,000 ransom repayments but would also have to provide hostages as security. Despite this, James held qualities that were admired. The contemporary Scotichronicon by Walter Bower described James as excelling at sport and appreciative of literature and music. Unlike his father and grandfather he did not take mistresses, but had many children by his consort, Queen Joan. The king had a strong desire to impose law and order on his subjects, but applied it selectively at times.
    To bolster his authority and secure the position of the crown, James launched pre-emptive attacks on some of his nobles beginning in 1425 with his close kinsmen the Albany Stewarts resulting in the execution of Duke Murdoch and his sons. In 1428 James detained Alexander, Lord of the Isles, while attending a parliament in Inverness. Archibald, 5th Earl of Douglas, was arrested in 1431, followed by George, Earl of March, in 1434. The plight of the ransom hostages held in England was ignored and the repayment money was diverted into the construction of Linlithgow Palace and other grandiose schemes.

    In August 1436, James failed humiliatingly in his siege of the English held Roxburgh Castle and then faced an ineffective attempt by Sir Robert Graham to arrest him at a general council. James was murdered at Perth on the night of 20/21 February 1437 in a failed coup by his uncle and former ally Walter Stewart, Earl of Atholl. Queen Joan, although wounded, managed to evade the attackers and was eventually reunited with her son James II in Edinburgh Castle.

    Prince and Steward of Scotland
    James was probably born in late July 1394 in Dunfermline, 27 years after the marriage of his parents Robert III and Annabella Drummond. It was also at Dunfermline under his mother's care that James would have spent most of his early childhood. The prince was seven years old when his mother died in 1401 and a year later his elder brother David, Duke of Rothesay was probably murdered by their uncle Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany after being held at Albany's Falkland Castle. Prince James, now heir to the throne, was the only impediment to the transfer of the royal line to the Albany Stewarts. In 1402 Albany and his close Black Douglas ally Archibald, 4th Earl of Douglas were absolved of any involvement in Rothesay's death clearing the way for Albany's re-appointed as the king's lieutenant. Albany rewarded Douglas for his support by allowing him to resume hostilities in England. The Albany and Douglas affinity received a serious reversal in September 1402 when their large army was defeated by the English at Homildon and numerous prominent nobles and their followers were captured. These included Douglas himself, Albany's son Murdoch, and the earls of Moray, Angus and Orkney. That same year, as well as the death of Rothesay, Alexander Leslie, Earl of Ross and Malcolm Drummond, lord of Mar had also died. The void created by these events was inevitably filled by lesser men who had not previously been conspicuously politically active. In the years between 1402 and 1406, the northern earldoms of Ross, Moray and Mar were without adult leadership and with Murdoch Stewart, the Justiciar for the territory north of the Forth, a prisoner in England, Albany found himself reluctantly having to form an alliance with his brother Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan and Buchan's son, also called Alexander to hold back the ambitions of the Lord of the Isles. Douglas's absence from his power base in the Lothians and the Scottish Marches encouraged King Robert's close allies Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney and Sir David Fleming of Biggar to take full advantage to become the principal political force in that region.

    In December 1404 the king granted the royal Stewart lands in the west, in Ayrshire and around the Firth of Clyde, to James in regality protecting them from outside interference and providing the prince with a territorial centre should the need arise. Yet, in 1405 James was under the protection and tutelage of Bishop Henry Wardlaw of St Andrews on the country's east coast. Douglas animosity was intensifying because of the activities of Orkney and Fleming who continued to expand their involvement in border politics and foreign relations with England. Although a decision to send the young prince to France and out of Albany's reach was taken in the winter of 1405–6 James's departure from Scotland was unplanned. In February 1406 Bishop Wardlaw released James to Orkney and Fleming who, with their large force of Lothian adherents, proceeded into hostile Douglas east Lothian. James's custodians may have been giving a demonstration of royal approval to further their interests in Douglas country. This provoked a fierce response from James Douglas of Balvenie and his supporters who, at a place called Long Hermiston Muir engaged with and killed Fleming while Orkney and James escaped to the comparative safety of the Bass Rock islet in the Firth of Forth.[6][16] They endured more than a month on there before boarding the France bound Maryenknyght, a ship from Danzig. On 22 March 1406 the ship was taken by English pirates and James became the hostage of King Henry IV of England. Robert III was at Rothesay Castle when he learned of his son's capture and died soon after on 4 April 1406 and was buried in the Stewart foundation abbey of Paisley.

    King in captivity
    James, now the uncrowned King of Scots, began what proved to be his 18 year period as a hostage while at the same time Albany transitioned from his position of lieutenant to that of governor. Albany took James's lands under his own control depriving the king of income and any of the regalia of his position and was referred to in records as 'the son of the late king'. The king had a small household of Scots that included Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, Alexander Seaton, the nephew of Sir David Fleming, and Orkney's brother John Sinclair following the earl's return to Scotland. In time, James's household—now paid for by the English—changed from high ranking individuals to less notable men. Henry IV treated the young James well, providing him with a good education. James was ideally placed to observe Henry's methods of kingship and political control having probably been admitted into the royal household on reaching adulthood. James used personal visits from his nobles coupled with letters to individuals to maintain his visibility in his kingdom. Henry died in 1413 and his son, Henry V, immediately ended James's comparative freedom initially holding him in the Tower of London along with the other Scottish prisoners. One of these prisoners was James's cousin, Murdoch Stewart, Albany's son, who had been captured in 1402 at the Battle of Homildon Hill. Initially held apart but from 1413 until Murdoch's release in 1415 they were together in the Tower and at Windsor Castle.

    By 1420, James's standing at Henry V's court improved greatly; he ceased to be regarded as a hostage and more of a guest. James's value to Henry became apparent in 1420 when he accompanied the English king to France where his presence was used against the Scots fighting on the Dauphinist side. Following the English success at the siege of Melun, a town southeast of Paris, the contingent of Scots were hanged for treason against their king. After his return to England, James attended Queen Catherine's coronation on 23 February 1421 receiving an honoured position of sitting immediately on the queen's left at the coronation banquet. In March, Henry began a circuit of the important towns in England as a show of strength and it was during this tour that James was knighted on Saint George's day. By July, the two kings were back campaigning in France where James, evidently approving of Henry's methods of kingship, seemed content to endorse the English king's desire for the French crown. Henry appointed the Duke of Bedford and James as the joint commanders of the siege of Dreux on 18 July 1421 and on 20 August they received the surrender of the garrison. Henry died of dysentery on 31 August 1422 and in September James was part of the escort taking the English king's body back to London.

    The regency council of the infant King Henry VI was inclined to have James released as soon as possible. In the early months of 1423 their attempts to resolve the issue met with little response from the Scots, clearly influenced by the Albany Stewarts and adherents. Archibald, Earl of Douglas was an astute and adaptable power in Southern Scotland whose influence even eclipsed that of the Albany Stewarts. Despite his complicity in James's brother's death in Albany's castle in 1402 Douglas was still able to engage with the king. From 1421, Douglas had been in regular contact with James and they formed an alliance that was to prove pivotal in 1423. Although Douglas was the pre-eminent Scottish magnate his position in the borders and Lothians was jeopordised—not only did he have to forcibly retake Edinburgh Castle from his own designated warden but was very likely under threat from the earls of Angus and March. In return for James's endorsement of Douglas's position in the kingdom, the earl was able to deliver his affinity in the cause of the king's home-coming. Also, the relationship between Murdoch—now Duke of Albany following his father's death in 1420—and his own appointee Bishop William Lauder seemed to be under strain perhaps evidence of an influential grouping at odds with Murdoch's stance. Pressure from these advocates for the king almost certainly compelled Murdoch to agree to a general council in August 1423 when it was agreed that a mission should be sent to England to negotiate James's release. James's relationship with the House of Lancaster changed in February 1423 when he married Joan Beaufort, a cousin of Henry VI and the niece of Thomas, Duke of Exeter and Henry, Bishop of Winchester. A ransom treaty of £40,000 sterling (less a dowry remittance of 10,000 marks) was agreed at Durham on 28 March 1424 to which James attached his own seal.[6] The king and queen escorted by English and Scottish nobles reached Melrose Abbey on 5 April and were met by Albany who relinquished his governor's seal of office.

    Personal rule
    First acts
    Throughout the 15th century, Scottish kings suffered from a lack of crown revenue and James's reign was no exception. The Albany regency had also been constrained with Duke Robert owed his fees of governorship. For the nobility, royal patronage ceased entirely following James's capture; irregular forms of political favours emerged with Albany allowing nobles such as the earl of Douglas and his brother James to remove funds from the customs. It was against this backdrop that James's coronation took place at Scone on 21 May 1424. The coronation parliament of the Three Estates witnessed the king perform a knighthood ceremony for eighteen prominent nobles including Alexander Stewart, Murdoch's son; an event probably intended to foster loyalty to the crown within the political community. Called primarily to discuss issues surrounding the finance of the ransom payments, the parliament heard James underline his position and authority as monarch. He ensured the passing of legislation designed to substantially improve crown income by revoking the patronage of royal predecessors and guardians. The earls of Douglas and Mar were immediately affected by this when their ability to remove large sums from the customs was blocked. Despite this, James was still dependent on the nobility—especially Douglas—for its support and initially adopted a less confrontational stance. The early exception to this was Walter Stewart, Albany's son. Walter was the heir to the earldom of Lennox and had been in open revolt against his father during 1423 for not giving way to his younger brother Alexander for this title. He also disagreed with his father's acquiescence to the return of James to Scotland. James had Walter arrested on 13 May 1424 and imprisoned on the Bass Rock—at this time, this was probably in Murdoch's interests as well as James's. It is probable that the king felt unable to move against the rest of the Albany Stewarts while Murdoch's brother, John Stewart, Earl of Buchan and Archibald, Earl of Douglas were fighting the English on the Dauphinist cause in France. Buchan, a leader with an international reputation, commanded the large Scottish army but both he and Douglas fell at the Battle of Verneuil in August 1424 and the Scottish army routed. The loss of his brother and the large fighting force left Murdoch politically exposed.

    A ruthless and acquisitive king
    Douglas's death at Verneuill was to weaken the position of his son Archibald, the 5th earl. On 12 October 1424, the king and Archibald met at Melrose Abbey ostensibly to agree the appointment of John Fogo, a monk of Melrose, to the abbacy. The meeting may also have been intended as an official acceptance of Douglas but it signalled a change in the Black Douglas predominance vis-a-vis the crown and other nobles. Important Douglas allies died in France and some of their heirs realigned with rival nobles through blood ties while at the same time Douglas experienced a loosening of allegiances in the Lothians and, with the loss of his command over Edinburgh Castle, this all served to improve James's position. Even though, James continued to retain Black Douglas support allowing him to begin a campaign of political alienation of Albany and his family. The king's rancor directed at Duke Murdoch had its roots in the past—Duke Robert was responsible for his brother David's death and neither Robert nor Murdoch exerted themselves in negotiating James's release and must have left the king with the suspicion that they held aspirations for the throne itself. Buchan's lands did not fall to the Albany Stewarts but were forfeited by the crown, Albany's father-in-law, Duncan, Earl of Lennox was imprisoned and in December the duke's main ally Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar settled his differences with the king. An acrimonious sitting of parliament in March 1425 precipitated the arrest of Murdoch, Isabella, his wife, and his son Alexander—of Albany's other sons Walter was already in prison and James, his youngest, also known as James the Fat, escaped into the Lennox.2

Family: Lady Joan Beaufort b. c 1400, d. 15 Jul 1445

  • Last Edited: 24 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_I_of_Scotland
  3. [S922] David Malcolm, Genealogical Memoir of the House of Drummond, page 34.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Stewart,_Dauphine_of_France.

Thomas Boyd 3rd of Kilmarnock1,2

M, #9097, b. circa 1385, d. 7 July 1432

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Alice Gifford b. c 1350

  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39610.htm#i396099
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_I_of_Scotland

Alice Gifford1

F, #9098, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Thomas Boyd 3rd of Kilmarnock b. c 1385, d. 7 Jul 1432

  • Last Edited: 23 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39610.htm#i396099
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_I_of_Scotland

John Colquhoun of Luss, 8th of Colquhoun & 10th of Luss1

M, #9099, b. 1380, d. 24 September 1439

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Janet Erskine b. c 1370

  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Janet Erskine1

F, #9100, b. circa 1370

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Elizabeth Lindsay1

F, #9101, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Robert Erskine of that Ilk, 1st Lord Erskine b. c 1370, d. 1452

  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Humphrey Colquhoun 6th of Colquhoun & 8th of Luss1

M, #9102, b. circa 1350, d. 1406

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Robert Colquhoun 5th of Colquhoun & 7th of Luss1

M, #9103, b. 1328, d. 1390

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Colquhoun

"The Fair Maid of Luss" (?) 7th Baroness, Heiress of Luss1

F, #9104, b. circa 1330

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Colquhoun

Humphrey de Colquhoun 4th of Colquhoun1

M, #9105, b. circa 1280, d. 1330

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Godfrey de Luss 6th of Luss1

M, #9106, b. circa 1300, d. 1385

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Godfrey de Luss 6th of Luss was born circa 1300 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1385 in Scotland.1
  • Last Edited: 28 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Robert Erskine of that Ilk, Ambassador1

M, #9107, b. circa 1325, d. 1385

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family 1: Christian Menteith b. c 1300

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 23 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S1163] Geni.com, online www.geni.com, https://www.geni.com/people/Christian-Menteith-of-Arran/…
  3. [S1163] Geni.com, online www.geni.com, https://www.geni.com/people/Christina-Erskine-of-Erskine/…

Duibhn Derg (?)1

M, #9108, b. circa 850

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duibhn Derg (?) was born circa 850 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 29 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Ferither Finruo (?)1

M, #9109, b. circa 825

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ferither Finruo (?) was born circa 825 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 29 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Christian Crichton of Sanquhar1

F, #9110, b. circa 1420, d. between 1477 and 1478

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Christian Crichton of Sanquhar was born circa 1420 in Sanquhar, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: She married James Livingston of Callendar, 2nd Lord Livingston in October 1466 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Christian Crichton of Sanquhar died between 1477 and 1478 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: The family of Crichton of Eliok and Cluny are undoubtedly descended from the Crichton, Lords of Sanquhar, as is confirmed on 13 May, 1566, when the Commissariat of
    Edinburgh pronounced Edward Crichton, Lord Sanquhar, John Crichton of Ryhill, uncle to this Edward, and Robert Crichton, Bishop of Dunkeld, as next of kin on the father’s
    side of James and Henry Crichton, sons of Mr. Robert Crichton of Eliok although the exact relationship has yet to be confirmed.2
  • Last Edited: 6 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S1162] The Red Book of Scotland Project, online http://http://redbookofscotland.co.uk,

    Crichton-of-Cluny.pdf.

William (?) Seigneur of Belleme1

M, #9111, b. between 960 and 965, d. 1028

Map of the lands of Bellême

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William (?) Seigneur of Belleme was born between 960 and 965 in Belleme, France*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Mathilde (?) of Conde-sur-Noireau circa 995 in France*.3
  • Death*: William (?) Seigneur of Belleme died in 1028 in France*.1
  • Biography*: William of Bellême (960/5 – 1028) called William Princeps, was the Seigneur of Bellême and a member of the House of Bellême.

    Life
    William was the son of Yves de Bellême and his wife Godeheut. Yves in turn was probably the son of Yves de Criel, magister balistarum (Latin meaning officer in charge of the royal siege train).

    With the consent of Richard I, Duke of Normandy William had constructed two castles, one at Alençon and the other at Domfront, while the caput of Yves' lordship was the castle of Bellême, constructed "a quarter of a league from the old dungeon of Bellême" in Maine. The first mention of William in any records was in 1000 as Marshall of the king's forces when he accompanied the King of France to Toulouse, the next mention being his succeeding his father in 1005. Also, in 1005 William along with his mother made several grants to local churches including the church of Boece, to which his father had founded in his castle of Bellême. Initially William attempted to revoke a gift of his father to Fleury Abbey but was so impressed with the abbot Gauzlin's appeal he restored the gift and also allowed his young son Benoit to become a monk there.

    His brother Avesgaud, Bishop of Le Mans who was engaged in constant warfare with Herbert I, Count of Maine. In 1020 Bishop Avesgaud fled to his brother's castle of Bellême after being driven out of his see by count Herbert, for which Avesgaud placed an interdict on Herbert and his lands and excommunicated the count. William joined forces with his brother Avesgaud attacking count Herbert at the castle of Ballon. At first William and Avesgaud were beaten back but Giroie (aka Géré), a vassal of William's held his ground and defeated Herbert's forces completely. William de Bellême introduced Giroie to Duke Richard at Rouen who rewarded Giroie with the lands of Heugon.

    In 1027 when Robert I, Duke of Normandy succeeded his brother Richard III, William de Bellême revolted against him. Robert laid siege to his castle of Bellême until William surrendered then had to humbly ask for forgiveness (in bare feet with a saddle on his shoulders). Having been forgiven and his fief of Alençon restored, William sent his sons Fulk and Robert to harass the Normans, but they were defeated and Fulk was killed in battle at Blavon.

    It is worth noting that neither William nor his father Ives ever attested any of their acts using the title comes (count), indicating they had feudal authority in their own territories but were not officially invested as counts.

    Family
    William married Mathilde of Condé-sur-Noireau, William and Mathilde had six sons:
    Fulk, died in his father's lifetime.
    Warin, died in 1026 under mysterious circumstances. He married Melisende, Vscountess of Chateaudun; their daughter Adela married Rotrou, Count of Mortagne (whose grandson was Rotrou 'the Great', Count of Perche and Morgagne).
    Robert, succeeded his father as Seigneur de Bellême, murdered in prison.
    Ives, Seigneur de Bellême and Bishop of Sées, succeeded his brother Robert, died 1070.
    William I Talvas held the honor of Bellême in right of his brother Ives.
    Benoit, a monk at Fleury Abbey.


    His widow Mathilde along with her son William Talvas both confirmed and increased gifts of William de Bellême to the church of Bellême.1
  • Last Edited: 10 Dec 2014

Yves de Belleme1

M, #9112, b. circa 940, d. circa 1005

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Yves de Belleme was born circa 940 in France*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Godeheut (?) circa 960 in France*.2
  • Death*: Yves de Belleme died circa 1005 in France*.1
  • Biography*: Yves de Bellême (died c. 1005), Seigneur de Bellême, the first known progenitor of the House of Bellême.

    Life
    Yves was probably the son of Yves de Creil, one of those who saved young Duke Richard I from death or mutilation at hand of King Louis IV of France. Yves de Bellême held the castle and lands of Bellême, of the King of France, as well as the Sonnois and part of the Passais, both held of the Count of Maine. That he held part of the march-lands of Passais is known from his having given abbot Gauzlin of Fleury Abbey the lands of Magny-le-Désert.

    His wife was named Godeheut and although her parentage is unknown, she was the sister of Seinfroy, Bishop of Le Mans. Yves was the founder of a church dedicated to the Virgin Mary in his castle of Bellême and endowed it with a church in the Sonoisis, another at Vieux Bellême plus a vill and three other churches in the Hiesmois. Yves died sometime after 1005.

    Family
    Yves de Bellême and his wife Godeheut had five children:
    William of Bellême (960/5 - 1028), succeeded his father as seigneur de Bellême.
    Yves de Bellême (d. 1030), Abbot of Fleury.
    Avesgaud de Bellême (d. 1036), Bishop of Le Mans.
    Hildeburg, abt. 1006 married Aimon, Seigneur de Chateau-du-Loir.
    Godehilde, married Hamon-aux-Dents or Hamon Le Dentu, he was the 1st Baron of Le Creully and he was Lord over Creully, Torigni, Évrecy & St. Scolasse-sur-Sarthe, but he lost all his lands, after trying to kill William the bastard, in the battle of Val-ès-Dunes, Normandy, France.1

Family: Godeheut (?) b. c 940

  • Last Edited: 10 Dec 2014

Godeheut (?)1

F, #9113, b. circa 940

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Yves de Belleme b. c 940, d. c 1005

  • Last Edited: 10 Dec 2014

Mathilde (?) of Conde-sur-Noireau1

F, #9114, b. circa 960

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William (?) Seigneur of Belleme b. bt 960 - 965, d. 1028

  • Last Edited: 10 Dec 2014

William I (?) Count of Provence1

M, #9115, b. circa 950, d. after 29 August 993

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Marriage: William I (?) Count of Provence married Adelaide d'Anjou, daughter of Fulk II d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou and Gerberge de Tours, circa 940 in France*.1
  • Birth*: William I (?) Count of Provence was born circa 950 in Provence, France*.1
  • Burial*: He was buried after 29 August 993 in church of St.-Croix, Sarrians, France*.1
  • Death*: He died after 29 August 993 in Avignon, France*.1
  • Biography*: William I (c. 950 – after 29 August 993), called the Liberator, was Count of Provence from 968 to his abdication. In 975 or 979, he took the title of marchio or margrave. He is often considered the founder of the county of Provence. He and his elder brother Rotbold II were sons of Boso II of Arles and Constance of Viennois, daughter of Charles-Constantine. They both carried the title of comes or count concurrently, but it is unknown if they were joint-counts of the whole of Provence or if the region was divided. His brother never bore any other title than count so long as William lived, so the latter seems to have attained a certain supremacy.

    In 980, he was installed as Count of Arles. His sobriquet comes from his victories against the Saracens by which he liberated Provence from their threat, which had been constant since the establishment of a base at Fraxinet. At the Battle of Tourtour in 973, with the assistance of the counts of the High Alps and the viscounts of Marseille and Fos, he definitively routed the Saracens, chasing them forever from Provence. He reorganised the region east of the Rhône, which he conquered from the Saracens and which had been given him as a gift from King Conrad of Burgundy. Also by royal consent, he and his descendants controlled the fisc in Provence. With Isarn, Bishop of Grenoble, he repopulated Dauphiné and settled an Italian count named Ugo Blavia near Fréjus in 970 in order to bring that land back to cultivation. For all this, he figures prominently in Ralph Glaber's chronicle with the title of dux and he appears in a charter of 992 as pater patriae.

    He donated land to Cluny and retired to become a monk, dying at Avignon, where he was buried in the church of Saint-Croix at Sarrians. He was succeeded as margrave by his brother. His great principality began to diminish soon after his death as the castles of his vassals, which he had kept carefully under ducal control, soon became allods of their possessors.

    Marriage and issue
    He married 1st Arsenda, daughter of Arnold of Comminges and their son was:
    William II (or III) of Provence.

    He married 2nd (against papal advice) in 984, Adelaide-Blanche of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou and Gerberga, and their daughter was:
    Constance of Arles (986–1034), married Robert II of France.1

Family: Adelaide d'Anjou b. c 940, d. 1026

  • Last Edited: 12 Dec 2014

(daughter) Comyn1

F, #9116, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51068.htm#i510679

(daughter) Comyn1

F, #9117, b. circa 1230

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2014

Sarah Fitz hugh1

F, #9118, b. between 1155 and 1160, d. circa 1204

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William Comyn Earl of Buchan b. 1163, d. 1233

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4674
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch#Family_tree.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4671

Richard Comyn1

M, #9119, b. circa 1194, d. between 1244 and 1249

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard Comyn was born circa 1194 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died between 1244 and 1249 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 19 Feb 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.

John I Comyn Lord of Badenoch1

M, #9120, b. circa 1215, d. circa 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John I Comyn Lord of Badenoch was born circa 1215 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died circa 1275 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: John Comyn (Cumyn) (born c. 1215, died c. 1275) was Lord of Badenoch in Scotland. He was justiciar of Galloway in 1258. He held lands in Nithsdale(Dalswinton, a Comyn stronghold, and Duncow) and Tynedale.

    Life
    The Comyn family were in effective power in Scotland from 1249 to 1255, when Alexander III of Scotland was a minor; John was one of those with court influence. The Comyns were ousted, by Alan Durward, but returned to power in 1257-8, before provoking a strong English reaction.

    He fought for Henry III of England at the Battle of Lewes (1265), with John Baliol the elder and Robert Bruce the elder, and was captured. In 1267 he was given license to crenellate Tarset Castle in Tynedale (by present-day Lanehead, near Hexham), by Henry III; Tarset had previously been held by Walter Comyn.

    He started castle construction at Blair Castle with a tower built in 1269. The place was soon taken back by David, Earl of Atholl.

    Family
    John was the son of a Richard Comyn and was the grandson (through Richard) of William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan.

    According to the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica he died in 1274, and was nephew of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan, Constable of Scotland), and of Walter Comyn, Earl of Mentieth. His date of death is also given as 1277.

    He succeeded his uncle Walter, in 1258, as Lord of Badenoch, and was succeeded by his son John II, the "Black Comyn". John I was known as the "Red Comyn", the nickname more commonly applied to his grandson.

    His second wife is given as Alice de Roos (Ros), or Alice de Lindsay of Lamberton. His first wife was called Eva.
    His children, at least four sons and four daughters, included:
    John II
    a daughter who married Alexander of Argyll
    a daughter who married Sir William Galbraith, 4th Chief of that Ilk, Lord of Kyncaith
    a daughter who married Galfrid de Mowbray
    a daughter who married Sir Andrew Moray.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.