Nes (?)1

M, #8971, b. circa 1125

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 24 Sep 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18992.htm#i189911
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18992.htm#i189912

William (?) Lord of Leuchers1

M, #8972, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William (?) Lord of Leuchers was born circa 1100 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Leuchars is a small town near the north-east coast of Fife in Scotland.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18992.htm#i189912
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leuchars

Lady Catherine Stewart1

F, #8973, b. circa 1450

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: John Forbes 6th Lord Forbes b. b 1477, d. 1547

  • Last Edited: 4 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10922.htm#i109212
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10825.htm#i108249
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Douglas,_Fair_Maid_of_Galloway.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2374.htm#i23737

Margaret Douglas1

F, #8974, b. circa 1420, d. circa 1474

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Margaret Douglas was born circa 1420 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: She married John Stewart 1st Earl of Atholl, son of Sir James Stewart of Lorn and Lady Joan Beaufort, circa 1440 in Scotland.1,2
  • Married Name: As of circa 1440,her married name was Stewart.1,2
  • Death*: Margaret Douglas died circa 1474 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Margaret Douglas, Countess of Douglas known as the Fair Maid of Galloway (died c. 1474) was a Scottish noblewoman, a member of the Black Douglas family towards the end of the family's position as a major force in Scotland.

    She was the daughter of Archibald Douglas, 5th Earl of Douglas and Eupheme Graham, daughter of Patrick Graham, Earl of Strathearn and Euphemia Stewart, Countess of Strathearn.

    She acquired Galloway when her two brothers (one of who was William Douglas, 6th Earl of Douglas) were murdered at the Black Dinner in Edinburgh Castle.

    She married her cousin William Douglas, 8th Earl of Douglas. When he was assassinated she obtained permission to marry his brother, James Douglas, 9th Earl of Douglas, but it is not entirely clear that the marriage ever happened, if it did it must have ended in divorce since they both married again. She then married John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl.
    She had no children by the Earls of Douglas, but two daughters by the Earl of Atholl. These were Janet, wife of Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly and Elizabeth, wife of Andrew Gray, 2nd Lord Gray. They both had issue by their respective husbands.

    Margaret Douglas in fiction
    She is a significant character in Black Douglas by Nigel Tranter, which is rather speculative about her relationship with the 8th and 9th Earls of Douglas.
    She also appears in Maid Margaret, a 1905 novel by Samuel Rutherford Crockett.2

Family: John Stewart 1st Earl of Atholl b. c 1440, d. 15 Sep 1512

  • Last Edited: 4 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10825.htm#i108249
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Douglas,_Fair_Maid_of_Galloway.

Archibald Douglas 5th Earl of Douglas1

M, #8975, b. 1390, d. 26 June 1439

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Archibald Douglas 5th Earl of Douglas was born in 1390 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Eupheme Graham, daughter of Patrick Graham and Eupheme Stewart Countess of Strathearn, circa 1425 in Scotland.1,4
  • Death*: Archibald Douglas 5th Earl of Douglas died on 26 June 1439 in Restalrig, Midlothian, Scotland.3
  • Burial*: He was buried after 26 June 1439 in Douglas, Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Archibald Douglas (1390 – 26 June 1439) was a Scottish nobleman and General during the Hundred Years' War.

    Life
    Douglas was the son of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas and Margaret Stewart, eldest daughter of Robert III. He was Earl of Douglas and Wigtown, Lord of Galloway, Lord of Bothwell, Selkirk and Ettrick Forest, Eskdale, Lauderdale, and Annandale in Scotland, and de jure Duke of Touraine, Count of Longueville, and Seigneur of Dun-le-roi in France. In contemporary French sources, he was known as Victon, a phonetic translation of his Earldom of Wigtown.

    He fought with the French at Baugé in 1421, and was made count of Longueville in Normandy. He succeeded to his father's Scottish and French titles in 1424, though he never drew on his father's French estates of the Duchy of Touraine. Douglas served as ambassador to England in 1424, during the ransoming of James I.

    He also sat on the jury of 21 knights and peers which convicted Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany and two of his sons of treason in 1424, leading to the execution of Albany and the virtual annihilation of his family.

    Following the murder of King James I of Scotland at Perth in 1437, Douglas was appointed Lieutenant General of Scotland, and held the office of Regent, during the minority of James II until to 1439. Douglas died from a fever in Restalrig, Midlothian, and was buried at Douglas.

    Marriage and issue
    Between 1423 and 1425 he married Eupheme Graham (before 1413–1468), daughter of Patrick Graham, de jure uxoris Earl of Strathearn, and Euphemia Stewart, Countess of Strathearn. They had three children.
    William Douglas (c.1424–24 November 1440), who briefly succeeded as 6th Earl
    Margaret Douglas, Fair Lady of Galloway (before 1435–1475)
    David Douglas (before 1439–24 November 1440)

    Both sons were summarily beheaded at Edinburgh Castle on trumped up charges, in the presence of the young King James II. The so-called 'Black Dinner' thus broke the power of the 'Black' Douglases. The lordships of Annandale and Bothwell were annexed by the crown, Galloway to Margaret Douglas, and the Douglas lands and earldom passed to William's great-uncle James Douglas, Earl of Avondale, who was himself implicated, with Sir William Crichton, in the murder of the young earl.3

Family: Lady Eupheme Graham b. c 1400

  • Last Edited: 4 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10825.htm#i108249
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10810.htm#i108096
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Douglas,_5th_Earl_of_Douglas.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemia_Stewart,_Countess_of_Strathearn.

Archibald Douglas 4th Earl of Douglas1

M, #8976, b. circa 1372, d. 1424

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Archibald Douglas 4th Earl of Douglas was born circa 1372 in Threave Castle or Bothwell Castle, Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Stewart Lady of Galloway, daughter of Robert III Stewart King of the Scots and Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots, circa 1390 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Archibald Douglas 4th Earl of Douglas died in 1424 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Archibald Douglas, Duke of Touraine, Earl of Douglas, and Wigtown, Lord of Annandale, Galloway 13th Lord of Douglas, (1372–1424) was a Scottish nobleman and warlord.

    Master of Douglas
    The eldest legitimate son of Archibald Douglas, 3rd Earl of Douglas and Joanna de Moravia of Bothwell, he was born either at Threave Castle or at Bothwell Castle c.1372 and was known as the Master of Douglas until his accession. By 1390 he had married the Princess Margaret of Carrick, a daughter of King Robert III of Scotland. Around this time, his father bestowed upon him the regalities of the Ettrick Forest, Lauderdale and Romannobridge, Peeblesshire.

    On 4 June 1400, King Robert appointed him Keeper of Edinburgh Castle for life, on a pension of 200 merks a year.

    Rites of Passage

    Renewal of the Percy/Douglas feud
    At Candlemas 1400 George I, Earl of March and Henry 'Hotspur' Percy had entered Scotland and laid waste as far as Papple in East Lothian. The villages of Traprain, Markle and Hailes were burnt and two unsuccessful attempts were made to invest Hailes Castle. The Master of Douglas, who held the office of Lord Warden of the Marches, surprised them by night at their camp near East Linton and defeated the English Force. The Douglases chased the enemy away as far as Berwick upon Tweed, slaughtering many stragglers in the woods near Cockburnspath.

    Siege of Edinburgh
    Later that summer Douglas was second in command to David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay, the lieutenant of the Kingdom, during the siege of Edinburgh Castle by Henry IV. Henry was unsuccessful in his endeavours and with Owain Glynd?r's rebellion gathering apace in Wales, he became the last English monarch to ever invade Scotland in person.

    Inheritance
    Archibald, the 3rd Earl died at Christmas 1400, and the new 4th Earl became the largest and most powerful magnate in the realm. His father's vast lordships stretched from Galloway Douglasdale, Moray, Clydesdale to the shires of Stirling and Selkirk. These were augmented by the forfeited lands of the Earl of Dunbar in Lothian and the Merse.
    Death of Rothesay

    In 1402 Douglas' brother-in-law, the heir to the throne, David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay was held in close arrest, first at the Bishop's Palace at St Andrews, then at the Royal Palace of Falkland. At Falkland, Duke David died on 27 March, in what have been alleged to be mysterious circumstances. The Duke was 24 years old and in good health prior to his arrest, and rumours abounded that he had been starved to death in Falkland's pit prison.

    Prince David had been arrested under a warrant issued in the name of his father the decrepit Robert III, by his uncle, Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany and Douglas. Both Albany and Douglas, were rumoured to have been the authors of any foul play suspected. This can be shewn by the fact that both men were summoned to appear before Parliament. However on 16 March, both men were acquitted when Parliament passed an act stating that the Prince had: "departed this life through Divine Providence, and not otherwise", clearing both of High Treason, and any other crime, and strictly forbidding any of the King's subjects to make the slightest imputation on their fame. This can be considered a whitewash, as the Kingdom of Scots could not afford to lose its two most powerful men due to renewed English hostility. Douglas and Albany were considered to be the only fit antidote to the traitorous Earl of March and his English allies.

    Homildon Hill
    On 22 June the same year, a small Scots force was beaten by George Dunbar, the Earl of March's son, at the Battle of Nesbit Moor. Douglas led a punitive raid with Murdoch of Fife, Albany's son, as far as Newcastle to avenge the battle. At the head of 10,000 men he laid waste to the whole of Northumberland. March persuaded Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland, and his son Harry "Hotspur" Percy to lie in wait for the returning Scots at Wooler. Once Douglas' men had made camp at Millfield, relatively low ground, the English army rushed to attack. The Scots did however have keen sentries and the army was able to retreat to the higher ground of Homildon hill, and organised into traditional Schiltron formations. Douglas had not learnt the lessons that had defeated his great uncle at the Battle of Halidon Hill seventy years previously. The Schiltrons presented a large target for the English Longbowmen, and the formations started to break. A hundred men, under Sir John Swinton of the Swintons of that Ilk, chose to charge the enemy saying: "Better to die in the mellay than be shot down like deer". All perished. It has been suggested that Douglas hesitated to signal the advance of his main force, and when he did, it was too little too late. Douglas' mauled army met the as yet unbloodied English men at arms, and were routed. Many of Douglas' leading captains were captured, including his kinsman George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus, Thomas Dunbar, 5th Earl of Moray and Murdoch of Fife. Douglas himself was captured having been wounded five times, including the loss of an eye. This wounding was despite the fact that it is alleged Douglas' armour had taken three years in its construction.

    Captivity

    With the Lords of the North
    If the Percies and the other English knights thought they had gained great immediate riches from ransoms, they were to be disappointed. They received a message from King Henry congratulating them their victory but forbidding the release of any of their prisoners.

    By 1403, Hotspur was in open rebellion against his King, joining with his kinsman Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester and Owain Glynd?r, Prince of Wales. Hotspur set free his Scots captives and Douglas with his co-prisoners decided to fight alongside their former captors. In the chivalric spirit of the time, Douglas marched with his former enemy Hotspur, and his forces to the meet with King Henry IV at the Battle of Shrewsbury. Fighting on the English king's side was George de Dunbar, 10th Earl of March, then in exile from Scotland. The result of the battle was another rout, Hotspur being killed by an arrow through the mouth. Douglas was once again captured, and suffered the loss of a testicle after having fought gallantly on the field and personally killing Edmund Stafford, 5th Earl of Stafford and Sir Walter Blount. Douglas had again tasted heavy defeat.
    Prisoner of King Henry

    Douglas was now a captive of King Henry. The cost of ransom of the Scots nobles taken at Homildon was proving hard for the impoverished Scots exchequer. When Prince James of Scotland was captured en route to France by English pirates in 1406, the position seemed impossible. The aged King Robert III died of grief it is said soon after. The Kingdom of Scots was now in the hands of the Duke of Albany de jure as well as de facto.

    Return to Scotland
    After giving his oath on Holy Scripture to King Henry to be his man above all others excepting King James, and on the production of suitable hostages for his Parole, Douglas was allowed to return to his estates to carry out his private affairs. Douglas had agreed again under oath to return to captivity in England upon an appointed day. At Easter Douglas went north and did not return upon the aforesaid day. King Henry wrote to Regent Albany complaining of this "un-knightly" behaviour and warned that unless Douglas returned the hostages would be dealt with at his pleasure. Douglas did not return. Only upon payment of 700 Merks in 1413 to the new King of England, Henry V were the hostages liberated.

    Lord of Annandale
    In a political volte-face, the Earl of March had been accepted back into the political fold in Scotland. Both Douglas and Albany being reconciled to him. In 1409 March's lands in Lothian and the Merse were returned to him. This on condition of the Regent that his Lordship of Annandale be transferred to the Earl of Douglas. With his Lordship of Galloway, Douglas now controlled the whole of South west Scotland. The friendship between Albany and Douglas was confirmed in 1410 when they arranged the marriage of John Stewart, Earl of Buchan, Albany's oldest son with Elizabeth, daughter of Douglas.

    Political Machinations

    Embassy to the continent
    Douglas went to Flanders and France in 1412, on arriving in Paris he entered into negotiations with John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy whereby they agreed a mutual defence and offence pact in their respective countries.

    Warden of the Marches
    Douglas had resumed his duties as Lord Warden of the Marches soon after his return to Scotland. On the Border he had a free rein to defend it and to keep the peace. However, it appears that Albany was not prepared to pay for this, so Douglas recovered his costs from customs fees on all trade goods entering the country.

    The Foul Raid
    In 1416, with King James still a hostage in England, Douglas twice visited London to enter negotiations for his release. Whilst there the Lollard faction, during Henry V's absence in France, tried to persuade the Scots delegation to go on the offensive. Albany decided that this would be an opportunity to reclaim Berwick upon Tweed and raised an army to take it. He despatched Douglas to Roxburgh Castle which was also held by the English. When the Scots learnt of a huge army led by King Henry's brother, John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford and Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter, they retreated ignominiously. The following devastation in Teviotdale and Liddesdale, and the burning of the towns of Selkirk, Jedburgh and Hawick earned this title of the "Foul Raid".

    The Great Army of Scotland
    Douglas's son the Earl of Wigtoun had been fighting in France with his son-in-law Buchan, where they were able to inflict a heavy defeat over the English at the Battle of Baugé in 1421. In 1423 Wigtoun and Buchan, arrived back in Scotland to raise more troops for the War effort, and personal request to the Earl of Douglas from Charles VII of France to lend his aid. Douglas' ally and King Charles' implacable enemy, John the Fearless of Burgundy had died in 1419, so Douglas willingly consented to the French King. After considerable gifts to the church, Douglas left his son, the Earl of Wigtoun in Scotland. Wigtoun was charged with care of his estates and the negotiations for the release of King James, Douglas prepared for war. Douglas and Buchan sailed into La Rochelle with an estimated 6500 men on 7 March 1424.

    Duke of Touraine and Lieutenant General of France
    On 24 April Charles VII reviewed his new troops at Bourges. Douglas was given the post of "Lieutenant-General in the waging of war through all the Kingdom of France". On 29 April, Douglas was granted the Duchy of Touraine, including the "Castle, town and city" of Tours, and the "Castle and town" of Loches. Douglas was the first foreigner and also the first non-royal to be granted Ducal status in France.

    Battle of Verneuil
    The newly created French duke was defeated and slain at Verneuil on 17 August 1424, along with his second son, James, and son-in-law John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan. Douglas was buried in the choir of Tours Cathedral, alongside Sir James Douglas, his son.

    Marriage and issue
    In 1390 he married Lady Margaret (d.1451), eldest daughter of John Stewart, Earl of Carrick, who later became King Robert III. Of their children:
    Archibald Douglas, 5th Earl of Douglas, and Wigton, &c., (1390–1439), who succeeded to the earldom.
    Elizabeth (d. c. 1451), who married first John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan, secondly Thomas, son of Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, and thirdly William Sinclair, 3rd Earl of Orkney (d. 1480).
    William Douglas (b. before 1401)
    Sir James Douglas (d. 17 August 1424)

    Douglas in Literature
    The 4th Earl of Douglas is represented in William Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 1 from the defeat at Homildon to his release following the Battle of Shrewsbury. Douglas also appears as a character in Edith Pargeter's 1972 novel A Bloody Field by Shrewsbury from his defeat and capture at Homildon through his participation at Shrewsbury on the rebels' side.2

Family: Margaret Stewart Lady of Galloway b. c 1368, d. bt 1450 - 1456

  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10810.htm#i108096
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Douglas,_4th_Earl_of_Douglas.

Margaret Stewart Lady of Galloway1

F, #8977, b. circa 1368, d. between 1450 and 1456

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Archibald Douglas 4th Earl of Douglas b. c 1372, d. 1424

  • Last Edited: 22 Jan 2015

Robert III Stewart King of the Scots1

M, #8978, b. 14 August 1337, d. 4 April 1406

Robert III
King of Scots

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert III Stewart King of the Scots was born on 14 August 1337 in Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots, daughter of Sir John Drummond 11th Thane of Lennox and Mary Montifex, before 31 May 1367 in Scotland.1,3,4
  • Death*: Robert III Stewart King of the Scots died on 4 April 1406 in Rothesay Castle, Scotland, at age 68.2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 4 April 1406 in Abbey of Paisley, Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Robert III (14 August 1337 – April 1406), born John Stewart, was King of Scots from 1390 to his death. He was known primarily as the Earl of Carrick before ascending the throne at age 53. He was the eldest son of Robert II and Elizabeth Mure and was legitimated with the marriage of his parents in 1347.

    John joined his father and other magnates in a rebellion against his grand-uncle, David II early in 1363 but submitted to him soon afterwards. He married Anabella Drummond, daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall before 31 May 1367 when the Steward ceded to him the earldom of Atholl. In 1368 David created him Earl of Carrick. His father became king in 1371 after the unexpected death of the childless King David. In the succeeding years Carrick was influential in the government of the kingdom but became progressively more impatient at his father's longevity. In 1384 Carrick was appointed the king's lieutenant after having influenced the general council to remove Robert II from direct rule. Carrick's administration saw a renewal of the conflict with England. In 1388 the Scots defeated the English at the Battle of Otterburn where the Scots' commander, James, Earl of Douglas, was killed. By this time Carrick had been badly injured by a horse-kick but the loss of his powerful ally, Douglas, saw a turnaround in magnate support in favour of his younger brother Robert, Earl of Fife and in December 1388 the council transferred the lieutenancy to Fife.

    In 1390, Robert II died and Carrick ascended the throne as Robert III but without authority to rule directly. Fife continued as lieutenant until February 1393 when power was returned to the king in conjunction with his son David. At a council in 1399 owing to the king's 'sickness of his person', David, now Duke of Rothesay, became lieutenant of the kingdom in his own right but supervised by a special parliamentary group dominated by Fife, now styled Duke of Albany. After this, Robert III withdrew to his lands in the west and for a time played little or no part in affairs of state. He was powerless to interfere when a dispute between Albany and Rothesay arose in 1401 which led to Rothesay's arrest and imprisonment at Albany's Falkland Castle where Rothesay died in March 1402. The general council absolved Albany from blame and reappointed him as lieutenant. The only impediment now remaining to an Albany Stewart monarchy was the king's only surviving son, James, Earl of Carrick. In February 1406 the 11 year-old James and a powerful group of followers clashed with Albany's Douglas allies resulting in the death of the king's counsellor Sir David Fleming of Cumbernauld. James escaped to the Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth accompanied by Henry Sinclair, Earl of Orkney and remained there for a month before boarding a ship bound for France. The vessel was intercepted near Flamborough Head and James became the prisoner of Henry IV of England and would remain captive for the next 18 years. Robert III died in Rothesay Castle on 4 April 1406 shortly after learning of his son's imprisonment and was buried at Paisley Abbey.

    Heir apparent[edit]
    John, then styled Lord of Kyle, first appeared in the 1350s as the commander of a campaign in the lordship of Annandale to re-establish Scottish control over English occupied territory.[1] In 1363, John joined his father Robert the Steward along with the earls of Douglas and March in a failed insurrection against King David II. The reasons for the rebellion were varied. In 1362, David II supported several of his royal favourites in their titles to lands in the Stewart earldom of Monteith and thwarted Stewart claims to the earldom of Fife. The king's involvement with Margaret Logie (née Drummond) and soon to be his queen may also have represented a threat in the Steward's own earldom of Strathearn where the Drummonds also had interests, while Douglas and March mistrusted David's intentions towards them.

    These nobles were also unhappy at the king's squandering of funds provided to him for his ransom and with the prospect that they could be sent to England as guarantors for the ransom payments. The dissension between the king and the Stewarts looked to have been settled before the end of spring 1367. On 31 May the Steward gave the earldom of Atholl to John, who by this time was already married to Annabella Drummond, the daughter of the queen's deceased brother, Sir John Drummond and (probably) Mary, heir of William Montefichet, lord of Auchterarder. David II reinforced the position of John and Annabella by providing them with the earldom of Carrick on 22 June 1368 and the tacit approval of John as the king's probable heir.[5] A Stewart succession was suddenly endangered when David II had his marriage to Margaret annulled in March 1369 leaving the king free to re-marry and with the prospect of a Bruce heir.

    On 22 February 1371 David II (who was preparing to marry the earl of March's sister, Agnes Dunbar) unexpectedly died, presumably to the relief of both John and his father. Robert was crowned at Scone Abbey on 27 March 1371 and before this date had given John—now styled Steward of Scotland—the ancestral lands surrounding the Firth of Clyde. The manner in which the succession was to take place was first entailed by Robert I when female heirs were excluded and David II attempted unsuccessfully on several occasions to have the council change the succession procedure. Robert II quickly moved to ensure the succession of John when the general council attending his coronation officially named Carrick as heir—in 1373 the Stewart succession was further strengthened when parliament passed entails defining the manner in which each of the king's sons could inherit the crown.[9] After the coronation John Dunbar who had received the lordship of Fife from David II now resigned the title so that the king's second son, Robert, earl of Monteith could receive the earldom of Fife—Dunbar was compensated with the provision of the earldom of Moray.

    A son, David, the future Duke of Rothesay, was born to Carrick and Annabella on 24 October 1378. In 1381, Carrick was calling himself 'lieutenant for the marches' sustained by his connections to border magnates such as his brother-in-law, James Douglas son of William, Earl of Douglas who he succeeded in 1384.

    Lieutenant of the kingdom
    Robert II's policy of building up Stewart domination in Scotland through the advancement of his sons saw Carrick as the pre-eminent Stewart magnate south of the Forth-Clyde line just as his younger brother Alexander, earl of Buchan, lord of Badenoch and Ross was in the north. Buchan's use of cateran supporters drew criticism from Northern nobles and prelates and demonstrated Robert II's inability or reluctance to control his son and resulted in him losing council support. The king's failure to take a leading role in prosecuting the war with England and Buchan's abuse of royal power in the north was the backdrop to the general council meeting at Holyrood Abbey in November 1384 where the decision was taken to sideline the king and provide the ruling powers to Carrick. In July 1385, under Carrick's lieutenancy, a Scottish army that included a French force commanded by Admiral Jean de Vienne penetrated into the north of England without any serious gains but provoked a damaging retaliatory attack by Richard II. In 1385, the general council sharply condemned Buchan's behaviour and sat with the intention of maneuvering Carrick into firmly intervening in the north.

    Despite this, Carrick did not bring Buchan under control and many of the lieutenant's supporters although pleased at the resumption of hostilities with England were unhappy at the continued northern lawlessness. Carrick had been made the king's lieutenant partly on the need to curb Buchan's excesses yet despite this by February 1387 Buchan had become even more powerful and influential when he was appointed Justiciar north of the Forth.

    A series of truces halted any further significant fighting but on 19 April 1388, English envoys sent to Scotland to again extend the ceasefire returned to Richard's court empty-handed—by 29 April Robert II was conducting a council in Edinburgh to authorise renewed conflict with England.[18] Although the Scots army defeated the English at the Battle of Otterburn in Northumberland in August 1388, its leader James, earl of Douglas was killed. Douglas died childless triggering a series of claims on his estate—Carrick backed his brother-in-law Malcolm Drummond, the husband of Douglas's sister while Carrick's brother Fife took the side of Sir Archibald Douglas, lord of Galloway who held an entail on his kinsman's estates and who ultimately succeeded to the earldom.[19] Fife, with his powerful Douglas ally together with those loyal to the king ensured at the December 1388 council meeting that the lieutenancy of Scotland would pass from Carrick (who had recently been badly injured from a horse-kick) to Fife.
    There was general approval of Fife's intention to properly resolve the situation of lawlessness in the north and in particular the activities of Buchan his younger brother. Buchan was stripped of his position of justiciar which would soon be given to Fife's son, Murdoch Stewart. In January 1390 Robert II was in the north-east perhaps to strengthen the now changed political outlook in the north of the kingdom.[20] He returned to Dundonald Castle in Ayrshire in March where he died on 19 April and was buried at Scone on 25 April.

    Kingship
    In May 1390 parliament granted John permission to change his regnal name to Robert, probably in part to maintain the link back to Robert I but also to disassociate himself from King John Balliol. The four-month delay in the crowning of Robert III can be seen as a period when Fife and his affinity sought to ensure their future positions and which also saw Buchan's opportunistic attack on Elgin Cathedral, settling an old score with the Bishop of Moray and possibly also a protest at Fife's reappointment as the king's lieutenant.

    In 1392, Robert III strengthened the position of his son David, now earl of Carrick, when he endowed him with a large annuity that allowed the young prince to build up his household and affinity and then in 1393 regained his right to direct rule when the general council decided that Fife's lieutenancy should end and that Carrick now of age should assist his father. This independence of action was demonstrated in 1395–6 when he responded to Carrick's unauthorised marriage to Elizabeth Dunbar, daughter of George, Earl of March by ensuring its annulment. The king appears to have also taken over the conduct of foreign affairs, preserving the peace with Richard II and managing to increase the power of the Red Douglas Earl of Angus in the southeast of the country as a counterbalance to Fife's Black Douglas ally. He further showed his authority when in an attempt to reduce inter-clan feuding and lawlessness, he arranged and oversaw a gladiatorial limited combat between the clans of Kay and Quhele (Clan Chattan) in Perth on 28 April 1396. David of Carrick progressively acted independently of his father taking control of the Stewart lands in the south-west while maintaining his links with the Drummonds of his mother and all at a time when Fife's influence in central Scotland remained strong.

    The king was increasingly blamed for the failure to pacify the Gaelic areas in west and north. The general council held in Perth in April 1398 criticised the king's governance and empowered his brother Robert and his son David—now respectively the Dukes of Albany and Rothesay—to lead an army against Donald, Lord of the Isles and his brothers. In November 1398, an influential group of magnates and prelates met at Falkland Castle that included Albany, Rothesay, Archibald, earl of Douglas, Albany's son Murdoch, justiciar North of the Forth along with the bishops Walter of St Andrews and Gilbert of Aberdeen—the outcome of this meeting manifested itself at the council meeting held in January 1399 when the king was forced to surrender power to Rothesay for a period of three years.

    The kin of the border earls took advantage of the confusion in England after the deposition of Richard II by Henry, Duke of Lancaster and harried and forayed into England causing much damage and taking Wark Castle around 13 October 1399. A far reaching dispute between Rothesay and George Dunbar, earl of March occurred when Rothesay, rather than remarrying Elizabeth Dunbar as previously agreed, decided to marry Mary Douglas, daughter of the earl of Douglas—March, enraged by this wrote to Henry IV on 18 February 1400 and by July had entered Henry's service. In 1401, Rothesay took on a more assertive and autonomous attitude, circumventing proper procedures, unjustifiably appropriating sums from the customs of the burghs on the east coast before provoking further animosity when he confiscated the revenues of the temporalities of the vacant bishopric of St Andrews. Rothesay had also in conjunction with his uncle, Alexander Stewart, earl of Buchan, confronted Albany's influence in central Scotland—as soon his lieutenancy expired in 1402 Rothesay was arrested and imprisoned in Albany's Falkland Castle where he died in March 1402. Rothesay's death probably lay with Albany and Douglas who would have looked upon the possibility of the young prince acceding to the throne with great apprehension—they certainly fell under suspicion but were cleared of all blame by a general council, 'where, by divine providence and not otherwise, it is discerned that he departed from this life.'

    Following Rothesay's death—with the restoration of the lieutenancy to Albany and the Scottish defeat at the battle of Humbleton—Robert III experienced almost total exclusion from political authority and was limited to his lands in the west. By late 1404 Robert, with the aid of his close councillors Henry Sinclair, earl of Orkney, Sir David Fleming and Henry Wardlaw, had succeeded in re-establishing himself and intervened in favour of Alexander Stewart, the earl of Buchan's illegitimate son, who was in dispute with Albany over the earldom of Mar. Robert III again exhibited his new resolve when in December 1404 he created a new regality in the Stewartry for his sole remaining son and heir James now earl of Carrick—an act designed to prevent these lands falling into Albany's hands. By 28 October 1405 Robert III had returned to Dundonald Castle in Ayrshire. With the king's health failing, it was decided in the winter of 1405–6 to send the young prince to France out of the reach of Albany. Despite this, the manner of James's flight from Scotland was unplanned. In February 1406, the 12 year-old James together with Orkney and Fleming at the head of a large group of followers left the safety of Bishop Wardlaw's protection in St Andrews and journeyed through the hostile Douglas territories of east Lothian—an act probably designed to demonstrate James's royal endorsement of his custodians but also a move by his custodians to further their own interests in the traditional Douglas heartlands. Events went seriously wrong for James and he had to escape to the Bass Rock in the Firth of Forth along with the earl of Orkney after his escorts were attacked by James Douglas of Balvenie and which resulted in Sir David Fleming's death. Their confinement on the rock was to last for over a month before a ship from Danzig, en route for France picked them up. On 22 March 1406 the ship was taken by English pirates off Flamborough Head who delivered James to King Henry IV of England. Robert III had moved to Rothesay castle where, after hearing of his son's captivity, died 4 April 1406 and was buried in the Stewart foundation abbey of Paisley.

    Family and issue
    Robert III married Anabella Drummond, the daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall and Lady Mary Montifex, daughter of Sir William Montifex. The marriage resulted in seven children:
    David, Duke of Rothesay (b. 24 Oct 1378- d. 26 Mar 1402), who was betrothed to Elizabeth Dunbar but later married Marjory Douglas, the daughter of Archibald Douglas, 3rd Earl of Douglas and Jean Moray (or Joanna Moravia) of Strathearn.
    Robert (died in infancy)
    James I of Scotland (b. Dec 1394 - d. 21 Feb 1437)
    Margaret (died between 1450 and 1456), married Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas, the son of Archibald Douglas, 3rd Earl of Douglas and Joanna de Moravia of Strathearn.
    Mary, Married 1st George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus; Married 2nd Sir James Kennedy the Younger; Betrothed to Sir William Cunningham; Married 3rd to Sir William Graham of Kincardine; Married 4th Sir William Edmonstone of Duntreath (ancestors of the Edmonstone baronets)
    Elizabeth, married James Douglas, 1st Lord Dalkeith, son of Sir James Douglas and Agnes Dunbar
    Egidia; she died in infancy
    Robert III also had at least two natural children:
    James Stewart of Killbride
    John Stewart of Ardgowan and Blackhall, who was an ancestor to the Shaw-Stewart baronets.2

Family: Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots b. c 1350, d. Oct 1401

  • Last Edited: 24 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10533.htm#i105321
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_III_of_Scotland
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anabella_Drummond
  4. [S922] David Malcolm, Genealogical Memoir of the House of Drummond, page 34.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_I_of_Scotland

Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots1,2

F, #8979, b. circa 1350, d. October 1401

Annabella Drummond
Queen Consort of Scotland

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots was born circa 1350 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.1,5,2
  • Married Name: As of circa 1367,her married name was Stewart.1,5
  • Marriage*: She married Robert III Stewart King of the Scots, son of Robert II Stewart King of the Scots and Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan, before 31 May 1367 in Scotland.1,5,2
  • Burial*: Annabella Drummond Queen Consort of the Scots was buried in October 1401 in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.5
  • Death*: She died in October 1401 in Scone Palace, Scotland.5,2
  • Biography*: Annabella Drummond (c. 1350–1401) was the Queen Consort of Scotland as the wife of Robert III of Scotland.

    She was the daughter of Sir John Drummond, of Stobhall, near Perth, 11th Thane of Lennox and Chief of Clan Drummond, and Mary Montifex. Her father's sister was Margaret Drummond, the second wife of David II of Scotland.

    She married John Stewart (the future Robert III of Scotland) in 1367. Soon, she was enveloped in a power struggle with her husband's brother, Robert. Since Anabella and John did have two daughters, but no sons for several years, he was a supporter of a law that would bar women from inheriting the throne.

    Annabella was crowned with her husband at Scone Palace when he came to the throne in 1390. She continued bearing children until she was past forty and had her last child, the future James I of Scotland, in 1394.

    Robert, an invalid since 1384 due to an accident with a horse, grew increasingly despondent and incompetent throughout the 1390s. During this time he is said to have said to his wife that he should be buried in a dung heap with the epitaph "Here lies the worst of kings and the most miserable of men". Anabella was prompted to take matters into her own hands. Protecting the interests of her oldest son, David, she arranged a great tournament in 1398 in Edinburgh, where her oldest son was knighted. In April of that year she also called a council where he was created Duke of Rothesay and Lieutenant of the Realm in the same year. Shortly after his mother's death he would be imprisoned by his uncle and died in mysterious circumstances.

    The Fife burgh of Inverkeithing was a favorite residence of the queen. Her presence is still recalled in the sandstone font, decorated with angels and heraldry, which she presented to the parish church of the town, one of Scotland's finest surviving pieces of late medieval sculpture.

    Issue
    Annabella had several children with Robert III:
    Elizabeth, married James Douglas, 1st Baron Dalkeith
    Mary, married first to George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus, second to Sir James Kennedy the Younger (by whom she had Gilbert Kennedy, 1st Lord Kennedy), third to William Graham of Kincardine, and fourth to Sir William Edmonstone of Duntreath.
    Egidia, died young
    Margaret, married Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas
    Robert, died young
    David, later Duke of Rothesay
    James, later King of Scots

    Death
    Annabella died in Scone Palace in October 1401, and was buried at her birthplace of Dunfermline. With the loss of her protection, her eldest son David would become the prey of his uncle, Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany, dying shortly after.5

Family: Robert III Stewart King of the Scots b. 14 Aug 1337, d. 4 Apr 1406

  • Last Edited: 24 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10533.htm#i105321
  2. [S922] David Malcolm, Genealogical Memoir of the House of Drummond, page 34.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102467
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102464
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anabella_Drummond
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_I_of_Scotland

Avelina Stewart1

F, #8980, b. circa 1175

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Duncan (?) 1st Earl of Carrick b. c 1175, d. 13 Jun 1250

  • Last Edited: 4 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Carrick.

John James Collins1

M, #8981, b. 24 April 1902

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 5 Jun 2017

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Birth Registration for John James Collins
    Registration year 1902
    Page 70201809.

Alonzo Cassidy1

M, #8982, b. circa 1870

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Annie (?) b. c 1870

  • Last Edited: 22 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Registration for Catherine Deagle & Andrew Cassidy
    Registration year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 411.

Annie (?)1

F, #8983, b. circa 1870

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Alonzo Cassidy b. c 1870

  • Last Edited: 22 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Registration for Catherine Deagle & Andrew Cassidy
    Registration year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 411.

William MacLeod1

M, #8984, b. circa 1875

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 22 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Registration for Elizabeth Deagle & Vance McLeod
    Registration year 1914
    Book 20
    Page 388.

Stephen Fougere1

M, #8985, b. 1892

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Ida Isabell Boudreau b. 1901

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Record of Charles DeCoste & Mary Irene Fourgere
    Registration year 1938
    Book 91
    page 925.
  2. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Record for Ida I Boudreau & Stephen Fougere
    Registration Year 1917
    Book 0
    Page 349
    Number 45.

Ida Isabell Boudreau1

F, #8986, b. 1901

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Stephen Fougere b. 1892

  • Last Edited: 1 Jan 2016

Citations

  1. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Record of Charles DeCoste & Mary Irene Fourgere
    Registration year 1938
    Book 91
    page 925.
  2. [S770] Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics, online https://www.novascotiagenealogy.com/, Marriage Record for Ida I Boudreau & Stephen Fougere
    Registration Year 1917
    Book 0
    Page 349
    Number 45.

Elizabeth Gillis1

F, #8987, b. circa 1860

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 5 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records, Birth record of Catherine Janet McLellan
    Page 42
    Line 8.

Catherine Jessie MacLellan1

F, #8988, b. 10 January 1902

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: (?) Milligan b. c 1902

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S9] Births, Church Record, June 1977 to September 1944 St. Joseph's Church, Margaree, Records, Birth record of Catherine Janet McLellan
    Page 42
    Line 8.
  2. [S826] Betty Milligan, "Milligan to Nolan," e-mail to Shirley Frances MacFarlane, Oct 22 2014.

(?) Milligan1

M, #8989, b. circa 1902

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Catherine Jessie MacLellan b. 10 Jan 1902

  • Last Edited: 27 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S826] Betty Milligan, "Milligan to Nolan," e-mail to Shirley Frances MacFarlane, Oct 22 2014.

Margaret de Menteith1

F, #8991, b. circa 1280

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Alexander Abernethy of that Ilk b. c 1281, d. c 1315

  • Last Edited: 14 Feb 2015

James Benedict MacDonald1

M, #8992, b. 22 March 1890

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S427] CBGHA, online www.cbgha.org, December 2014 issue
    Immaculate Conception Parish baptisms.

Dougal Campbell of Ardaillour1

M, #8993, b. circa 1493, d. before 10 May 1550

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Janet Graham b. c 1495

  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Janet Graham1

F, #8994, b. circa 1495

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Dougal Campbell of Ardaillour b. c 1493, d. b 10 May 1550

  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Iain Campbell 4th of Ardkinglass1

M, #8995, b. circa 1460

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Iain Campbell 4th of Ardkinglass was born circa 1460 in Ardkinglass, Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Graham circa 1509.1
  • Biography*: CAMPBELL
    OF ARDKINGLASS
    SIR COLIN CAMPBELL OF ARDKINGLASS, was a younger son of Sir Colin Campbell of
    Lochawe, and obtained the lands of Ardkinglass at the head of Loch Fyne. He m.
    Christina, daughter of Robert Lamont of Inneryne, (Papal Dispensation dated in 1399),
    and was father of :
    SIR JOHN CAMPBELL OF ARDKINGLASS, was witness to a mortification by Sir Duncan
    Campbell of Lochawe to the Collegiate church of Kilmun dated 4 August 1442,1
    and
    afterwards to an obligation by Sir Colin Campbell of Lochawe, to Cristine, son of Finlay,
    son of Eugene of Ardlamont, dated 21 May 1454.2 He d. by 17 December 1470, and was
    father of :
    COLIN CAMPBELL OF ARDKINGLASS, succeeded to the lands of Ardkinglass by 17 December 1470, when he was witness to a charter by Colin, Earl of Argyll, granting the
    lands of Barcaldine and numerous others in the Lordship of Lorn, to Sir Colin Campbell of Glenorchy.3 He d. by February 1481, and was father of :

    JOHN CAMPBELL OF ARDKINGLASS, succeeded and was included in the remainder in a charter under the Great Seal granting the lands of Knapdale and the custody of the castle
    of Castleton, in the sheriffdom of Perth, to Colin, Earl of Argyll, on 26 February 1480-81.4 He was included in the remainder of a charter under the Great Seal granting the lands
    of Dollar to Archibald, Earl of Argyll, on 11 May 1497,5 and was either identical to or else had been succeeded by :

    1 RMS 1424-1513. No. 346.
    2
    Inveryne Inventory No. 35.
    3 GD112/2/107/1
    4 RMS 1424-1513. No. 1464.
    5 RMS 1424-1513. No. 2354.
    © Gordon MacGregor: The Red Book of Scotland Project - 2017.
    www.redbookofscotland.co.uk

    Page 2 of 10

    JOHN CAMPBELL OF ARDKINGLASS, succeeded to the lands of Ardkinglass by 1 February 1509, when he was witness to a charter by Matthew Stewart, Earl of Lennox,
    granting the lands of Gairlochead to Archibald, Earl of Argyll,1 and made a mortification of his lands of Knockenbaynocht to the parish church of Lochgoil which passed through
    the Privy Seal on 31 August 1512.2 He d. between then and 16 June 1524, possibly with his Chief and a large number of his kinsmen at the battle of Flodden in September 1513.2

Family: Margaret Graham b. c 1460

  • Last Edited: 6 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S1162] The Red Book of Scotland Project, online http://http://redbookofscotland.co.uk,
    Campbell-of-Ardkinglass.pdf.

Margaret Graham1

F, #8996, b. circa 1460

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Iain Campbell 4th of Ardkinglass b. c 1460

  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Agnes Colquhoun1

F, #8997, b. circa 1468, d. after 1528

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Margaret de Montgomery1

F, #8998, b. 1423, d. 1462

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: John Stewart 1st Earl of Lennox b. c 1420, d. bt 8 Jul 1495 - 11 Sep 1495

  • Last Edited: 21 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stewart,_1st_Earl_of_Lennox.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_Campbell,_2nd_Earl_of_Argyll.

Alexander Montgomery of Androssan, 1st Lord Montgomery1

M, #8999, b. circa 1400, d. 1470

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Alexander Montgomery of Androssan, 1st Lord Montgomery was born circa 1400 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Boyd circa 1423 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Alexander Montgomery of Androssan, 1st Lord Montgomery died in 1470 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Alexander Montgomerie, 1st Lord Montgomerie (died 1470?) was a Scottish nobleman and diplomat.

    Life
    He was the eldest son of Sir John Montgomerie of Ardrossan, by his wife Agnes, daughter of John of Islay, Lord of the Isles. In 1425 he was chosen a member of the privy council of James I. He succeeded his father some time before 22 November 1429, and in August 1430 he was, jointly with his brother-in-law, Sir Robert Cunningham of Kilmaurs, appointed governor of Cantyre and Knapdale.

    On 30 November 1436 Montgomerie was appointed a commissioner to conclude a treaty with England, and he was one of the conservators of the truce concluded on 31 March for nine years. With the other Scottish commissioners he received the present of a silver cup from Henry VI of England. On 5 February 1444 he had a safe-conduct to go to Durham to treat for the extension of the truce and the return of the Scottish hostages.

    In 1444 Montgomerie was appointed keeper of Brodick Castle on the Isle of Arran. He was one of those who set their seals to instruments passed by the parliament held at Perth, Scotland on 9 June 1445 against the lords who had rebelled against James II. He was created a lord of parliament by the title of Lord Montgomerie some time before 3 July 1445; and on 14 August 1451 he was a conservator for a truce with England, and in subsequent years he was sent to England on further embassies. He died about 1470.

    Family
    With his wife Margaret, Montgomerie had three or four sons and three daughters:
    Alexander, master of Montgomerie and father of Hugh Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Eglinton;
    George, ancestor of the Montgomeries of Skelmorlie;
    Thomas, parson of Eaglesham, and rector of the university of Glasgow;
    John of Giffen (doubtful);
    Margaret, married to John Stewart, 1st Earl of Lennox;
    Elizabeth, to Gilbert Kennedy, 1st Lord Kennedy; and
    Agnes, to William Cunningham of Glengarnock.2

Family: Margaret Boyd b. c 1400, d. a 16 Sep 1453

  • Last Edited: 21 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Montgomerie,_1st_Lord_Montgomerie.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stewart,_1st_Earl_of_Lennox.

Margaret Boyd1

F, #9000, b. circa 1400, d. after 16 September 1453

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 21 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stewart,_1st_Earl_of_Lennox.