Raoul II de Crepi Comte de Crepi1

M, #8011, b. 1010

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Raoul II de Crepi Comte de Crepi was born in 1010 in France.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 18 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p402.htm#i4018

St. Olaf Skotkonung King of Sweden1,2

M, #8012, b. before 995, d. 1022

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: St. Olaf Skotkonung King of Sweden was also known as Olaf Eiriksson.2
  • Birth*: He was born before 995 in Sweden*.1,2
  • Baptism: St. Olaf Skotkonung King of Sweden was baptized circa 1008 in Husaby, Sweden*.2
  • Marriage*: He married Astrid (?) circa 1010 in Sweden*.3
  • Death*: St. Olaf Skotkonung King of Sweden died in 1022 in Stockholm, Sweden*; His death is said to have taken place in the winter of 1021–1022. According to a legend he was martyred at Stockholm after refusing to sacrifice to pagan gods. He's venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church.2
  • Biography*: Olof Skötkonung (Old Swedish: Olawær Skotkonongær, Old Icelandic: Óláfr sænski), also known as Olaf Eiríksson (c. 980–1022) was King of Sweden, son of Eric the Victorious and, according to Icelandic sources, Sigrid the Haughty. He succeeded his father in 995.

    Etymology
    One of many explanations to the name Skötkonung is that it is derived from the Swedish word "skatt", which can mean either "taxes" or "treasure". The latter meaning has given the interpretation "tributary king" and one English scholar speculates about a tributary relationship to the Danish king Sweyn Forkbeard, who was his stepfather. This explanation is however highly speculative as it is not supported by any evidence or historical sources. Another possible explanation of the name is that it means "treasure king" and refers to the fact that he was the first Swedish king to stamp coins. An ancient land ownership ceremony which placed a parcel of earth in someone's lap (Swedish: sköte) was called scotting and may have been involved in this epithet.

    The Icelandic "Óláfr sænski" means "Olaf the Swedish", an epithet used to distinguish him from the Norwegian kings Olaf Tryggvasson and Olaf Haraldsson.

    Life
    Our knowledge of Olof is mostly based on Snorri Sturluson's and Adam of Bremen's accounts, which have been subject to criticism from source-critical scholars. But according to Adam of Bremen, Sweyn Forkbeard was forced to defend his Danish kingdom from attacks by Olof who claimed the Danish throne. The conflict was resolved by Sweyn's marriage with Olaf's mother and the two kings were thereafter allies. Also Snorri Sturluson describes Sweyn and Olof as equal allies when they defeated the Norwegian king Olav Tryggvason in the battle of Svolder 1000, and thereafter divided Norway between themselves.

    Viking expedition to Wendland
    In a Viking expedition to Wendland, he had captured Edla, the daughter of a Wendish chieftain, and she gave him the son Emund (who was to become king of Sweden), and the daughter Astrid -later wife of Olaf II of Norway. He later married Estrid of the Obotrites, and she bore him the son Anund Jacob and the daughter Ingegerd Olofsdotter.

    Alliance with Sweyn Forkbeard
    Olof is said to have preferred royal sports to war and therefore Sweyn Forkbeard retook Denmark, which Olof's father Eric had conquered.[4] Olof also lost the right to tribute which his predecessors had preserved in what is now Estonia and Latvia.

    In 1000, he allied with Sweyn Forkbeard, who was married to Olof's mother, and with the Norwegian Jarls Eric and Sven, against the Norwegian King Olaf Tryggvason. Olaf Tryggvason died in the Battle of Svolder and Olof gained a part of Trøndelag as well as modern Bohuslän.

    Norwegian-Swedish War
    When the Norwegian kingdom was reestablished by Olaf II of Norway, a new war erupted between Norway and Sweden. Many men in both Sweden and Norway tried to reconcile the kings. In 1018, Olof's cousin, the earl of Västergötland, Ragnvald Ulfsson and the Norwegian king's emissaries Björn Stallare and Hjalti Skeggiason had arrived at the thing of Uppsala in an attempt to sway the Swedish king to accept peace and as a warrant marry his daughter Ingegerd Olofsdotter to the king of Norway. The Swedish king was greatly angered and threatened to banish Ragnvald from his kingdom, but Ragnvald was supported by his foster-father Thorgny Lawspeaker.

    Thorgny delivered a powerful speech in which he reminded the king of the great Viking expeditions in the East that predecessors such as Erik Anundsson and Björn had undertaken, without having the hubris not to listen to their men's advice. Thorgny, himself, had taken part in many successful pillaging expeditions with Olof's father Eric the Victorious and even Eric had listened to his men. The present king wanted nothing but Norway, which no Swedish king before him had desired. This displeased the Swedish people, who were eager to follow the king on new ventures in the East to win back the kingdoms that paid tribute to his ancestors, but it was the wish of the people that the king make peace with the king of Norway and give him his daughter Ingegerd as queen.

    Thorgny finished his speech by saying: if you do not desire to do so, we shall assault you and kill you and not brook anymore of your warmongering and obstinacy. Our ancestors have done so, who at Mula thing threw five kings in a well, kings who were too arrogant as you are against us.

    However, Olof married his daughter Ingegerd-Irene to Yaroslav I the Wise instead. An impending war was settled when Olof agreed to share his power with his son Anund Jacob. Olof was also forced to accept a settlement with Olaf II of Norway at Kungahälla, who already had been married (unbeknownst to Olof) with Olof's daughter, Astrid, through the Geatish jarl Ragnvald Ulfsson.

    Christian King
    Olof was baptised in Husaby, probably by the missionary Sigfrid, c.1008, At Husaby church,there is sign at Husaby Honor his baptism and what is thought to be the well at the Holy spring where Olaf was baptised. to He was the first Swedish king to remain Christian until his death. However, according to Adam of Bremen, the fact that the vast majority of the Swedes were still pagan forced him to limit Christian activities to the already Christian border province of Västergötland.

    When he stamped coins in Sigtuna in the province of Uppland Olof used the word rex for king. OLUF REX. The use of Latin seems to suggest that he was already baptised at this time but on the other hand the coins were imitating English pennies in type and style. Sigtuna is written SITUN, ZINT, ZTNETEI, or SIDEI. The two last has been deciphered as Si(gtuna) Dei meaning God's Sigtuna.

    Óláfsdrápa sænska
    The Icelandic skald Óttarr svarti spent some time at Olof's court and composed the poem Óláfsdrápa sænska describing Olof's war expeditions in the east. Other skalds who served Olof were Gunnlaugr ormstunga, Hrafn Önundarson and Gizurr svarti.

    Death and Veneration

    His death is said to have taken place in the winter of 1021–1022. According to a legend he was martyred at Stockholm after refusing to sacrifice to pagan gods. He's venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church.

    Since the 1740s, it has been claimed that he was buried in Husaby in the Christian part of his kingdom, but such identifications are controversial.2

Family 1: Astrid (?)

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 9 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p11458.htm#i114579
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olof_Sk%C3%B6tkonung
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p4289.htm#i42889

Eric VI (?) King of Sweden1

M, #8013, b. circa 945, d. 995

Eric praying to Odin before the Battle of Fýrisvellir, as envisioned by 20th century artist

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Eric VI (?) King of Sweden was also known as Eric the Victorious (?)3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 945 in Sweden*.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Sigrid 'The Haughty' (?), daughter of Skogul Toste, before 995 in Sweden*.1
  • Death*: Eric VI (?) King of Sweden died in 995 in Sweden*.3
  • Biography*: Erik VI, King of Sweden also went by the nick-name of Erik 'the Victorious' (?). He gained the title of King Erik VI of Sweden circa 980

    Eric the Victorious (Old Norse: Eiríkr inn sigrsæli, Modern Swedish: Erik Segersäll) (945? – c. 995) was the first Swedish king (970–995) about whom anything definite is known. Whether he actually qualifies as King of Sweden has been debated, as his son Olof Skötkonung was the first ruler documented to have been accepted both by the Svear around Lake Mälaren and by the Götar around Lake Vättern.

    Sometimes Eric the Victorious is referred to as either King Eric V or VI, modern inventions based on counting backwards from Eric XIV (1560–68), who adopted his numeral according to a fictitious history of Sweden. Whether or not there were any Swedish monarchs named Eric before Eric the Victorious is disputed, with some historians claiming that there were several earlier Erics, and others questioning the reliability of the primary sources used and the existence of these earlier monarchs. The list of monarchs after him is also complicated which makes the assignment of any numeral problematic.

    His original territory lay in Uppland and neighbouring provinces. He acquired the name "victorious" as a result of his defeating an invasion from the south in the Battle of Fýrisvellir close to Uppsala. Reports that Eric's brother Olof was the father of his opponent in that battle, Styrbjörn the Strong, belong to the realm of myth.

    The extent of his kingdom is unknown. In addition to the Swedish heartland round lake Mälaren it may have extended down the Baltic Sea coast as far south as Blekinge. According to Adam of Bremen, he also briefly controlled Denmark after having defeated Sweyn Forkbeard.

    According to the Flateyjarbok, his success was because he allied with the free farmers against the aristocratic jarl class, and it is obvious from archeological findings that the influence of the latter diminished during the last part of the tenth century.[6] He was also, probably, the introducer of the famous medieval Scandinavian system of universal conscription known as the ledung in the provinces around Mälaren.

    In all probability he founded the town of Sigtuna, which still exists and where the first Swedish coins were stamped for his son and successor Olof Skötkonung.

    Sagas
    Eric the Victorious appears in a number of Norse sagas, historical stories which nonetheless had a heathy dose of fiction. In various stories, he is described as the son of Björn Eriksson, and as having ruled together with his brother Olof. It was claimed that he married the infamous (and likely fictional) Sigrid the Haughty, daughter of the legendary Viking Skagul Toste, and later divorced her and gave her Götaland as a fief. According to Eymund's saga he took a new queen, Auð, the daughter of Haakon Sigurdsson, the ruler of Norway.

    Before this happened, his brother Olof died, and a new co-ruler had to be appointed, but the Swedes are said to have refused to accept his rowdy nephew Styrbjörn the Strong as his co-ruler. Styrbjörn was given 60 longships by Eric and sailed away to live as a Viking. He would become the ruler of Jomsborg and an ally and brother-in-law of the Danish king Harold Bluetooth. Styrbjörn returned to Sweden with an army, although Harald and the Danish troops supposedly turned back. Eric won the Battle of Fýrisvellir at Old Uppsala, according to Styrbjarnar þáttr Svíakappa after sacrificing to Odin and promising that if victorious, he would give himself to Odin in ten years.

    Adam of Bremen relates that Eric was baptised in Denmark but that he forgot about the Christian faith after he returned to Sweden.3
  • Last Edited: 9 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p4289.htm#i42889
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10133.htm#i101326
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_the_Victorious

Sigrid 'The Haughty' (?)1

F, #8014, b. circa 975

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Eric VI (?) King of Sweden b. c 945, d. 995

  • Last Edited: 27 Feb 2013

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p4289.htm#i42889
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10481.htm#i104807
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p4289.htm#i42889
    http://thepeerage.com/p10481.htm#i104807

Astrid (?)1

F, #8015

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: St. Olaf Skotkonung King of Sweden b. b 995, d. 1022

  • Last Edited: 7 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p4289.htm#i42889

Bjorn Ericsson King of Sweden1

M, #8016, b. circa 850, d. circa 932

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Bjorn Ericsson King of Sweden was born circa 850 in Sweden*.1,2
  • Death*: He died circa 932 in Sweden*.2
  • Biography*: Björn (ruled 882–932) was the father of Olof (II) Björnsson and Eric the Victorious, and he was the grandfather of Styrbjörn the Strong, according to the Hervarar saga and Harald Fairhair's saga. According to the two sagas, he was the son of an Erik who fought Harald Fairhair and who succeeded the brothers Björn at Hauge and Anund Uppsale:
    King Önund had a son called Eric, and he succeeded to the throne at Upsala after his father. He was a rich King. In his days Harold the Fair-haired made himself King of Norway. He was the first to unite the whole of that country under his sway. Eric at Upsala had a son called Björn, who came to the throne after his father and ruled for a long time. The sons of Björn, Eric the Victorious, and Olaf succeeded to the kingdom after their father. Olaf was the father of Styrbjörn the Strong.(Hervarar saga)

    The latter saga relates that he ruled for 50 years:
    There were disturbances also up in Gautland as long as King Eirik Eymundson lived; but he died when King Harald Harfager had been ten years king of all Norway. After Eirik, his son Bjorn was king of Svithjod for fifty years. He was father of Eirik the Victorious, and of Olaf the father of Styrbjorn. (Harald Fairhair's saga)

    In Olaf the Holy's saga, Snorri Sturluson quotes Thorgny Lawspeaker on king Björn:
    My father, again, was a long time with King Bjorn, and was well acquainted with his ways and manners. In Bjorn's lifetime his kingdom stood in great power, and no kind of want was felt, and he was gay and sociable with his friends. (Saga of Olaf Haraldsson)

    When Björn died, Olof and Eric were elected to be co-rulers of Sweden. However, Eric would disinherit his nephew Styrbjörn.

    Adam of Bremen, however, only gives Emund Eriksson as the predecessor of Eric the Victorious. Since the Swedes seem to have had a system of co-rulership (Diarchy), it is probable that Emund Eriksson was a co-ruler of Björn's.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 12 Mar 2015

Fulk II d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou1

M, #8017, b. circa 905, d. 958

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Fulk II d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou was born circa 905 in Anjou, France*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Gerberge de Tours, daughter of Theobald de Tours, circa 938 in France.3
  • Death*: Fulk II d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou died in 958 in Tours, France*.2
  • Biography*: Fulk II d'Anjou, Comte d'Anjou also went by the nick-name of Fulk 'the Good'. He gained the title of Comte d'Anjou.

    Fulk II of Anjou (c.?905—960), called le Bon (the good) was count of Anjou from 941 to his death.

    Life
    Fulk II born c.?905 was a son of Fulk the Red and his wife Roscilla de Loches, daughter of Warnerius, Seigneur de Villentrois. He succeeded his father in 941 as the second count of Anjou, also called the count of Angers, and remained in power until 960.

    The Angevins, Fulk II included, had become particularly adept at establishing marriage alliances that furthered their goals. His father, Fulk the Red had arranged his marriage to a Carolinian, Gergerga, the daughter of Ratburnus I Viscount of Vienne. Among other things this alliance opened the doors for their daughter Adelaide-Blanche to marry a future king of France and their son Guy to become Bishop of le Puy.. After her death c.?952 Fulk made another astute political marriage to Adelaide, the widow of Alan count of Nantes, through which Fulk gained control of Nantes. She was also the sister of Theobald I, Count of Blois which formed an alliance with Blois.

    Fulk died in 960. He was succeeded by his son Geoffrey Greymantle.2,4

Family: Gerberge de Tours

  • Last Edited: 14 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i47
    http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i48
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i48
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i47
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_II_of_Anjou
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11358.htm#i113582

Gerberge de Tours1

F, #8018

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Fulk II d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou b. c 905, d. 958

  • Last Edited: 14 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i47
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i49
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11358.htm#i113582

Fulk I d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou1

M, #8019, b. circa 870, d. 942

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Fulk I d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou was born circa 870 in Anjou, France*.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Roselle de Loch, daughter of Gardier de Loch Seigneur de Loch, circa 905 in France.1
  • Death*: Fulk I d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou died in 942 in Anjou, France*.2
  • Biography*: Fulk I of Anjou (870 – 942), called 'the Red' (Latin: Rufus) (French: Le Roux), held the county of Anjou first as Viscount then Count until his death.

    Life
    Born about c.?870, Fulk was the son of Ingelger of Anjou and Adelais de Amboise. He was the first count of Anjou ruling the county from c.?908 to 942. In 899 he became Viscount of Tours and in 905, Count of Tours. About 90-918 he was Count of Nantes, and in 929 he became count of Anjou. He increased the territory as a viscountcy of Angers and it became a county around 929. During his reign, he was permanently at war with the Normans and the Bretons. He occupied the county of Nantes in 907, but abandoned it to the Bretons in 919. Fulk I died around 942.

    Family
    Fulk married Roscille de Loches, daughter of Warnerius (Widone),Seigneur de Loches, de Villentrois, & de la Haye, and his wife Tecandra. He and Roscille had:
    Ingelger († bef. 927).
    Guy (Wido), Bishop of Soissons († 970).
    Fulk II. Succeeded his father as Count of Anjou.
    Arsinde d'Anjou, married William III, Count of Toulouse.2

Family: Roselle de Loch b. c 880

  • Last Edited: 14 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i48
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulk_I_of_Anjou

Roselle de Loch1

F, #8020, b. circa 880

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Fulk I d'Anjou Comte d'Anjou b. c 870, d. 942

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p5.htm#i48
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p510.htm#i5094

Gardier de Loch Seigneur de Loch1

M, #8021, b. circa 850

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gardier de Loch Seigneur de Loch was born circa 850 in France*.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 23 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p510.htm#i5094

Earl Finn Arnesson1

M, #8022, b. circa 975

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Earl Finn Arnesson was born circa 975 in Norway*.1
  • Marriage*: He married Bergljot Halvdansdottir circa 1000 in Norway*.1
  • Biography*: Finn Arnesson (died c. 1065) was a Norwegian nobleman and advisor to both King Olaf II of Norway and King Harald III of Norway and later served King Sweyn II of Denmark. Finn Arnesson was the feudal lord (lendmann) of Austrått.

    Biography
    Finn was one of the eight children, seven brothers and a sister, of Arne Arnmodsson, a Lendmann, and his wife Tora Torsteinsdatter (daughter of Thorstein Gallows). Finn was married to King Harald's niece Bergljot Halvdansdottir, the daughter of Halvdan Sigurdsson (Halfdan Hadafylke) and sister of Sigurd Syr.

    The main source for Finn's life is Snorri Sturluson's Heimskringla. Finn and his brothers Kalv Arnesson, Arni Arnesson and Torberg Arnesson all appear in the Sagas. Snorre rendered an episode where Finn acting energetically on the King Olaf's behalf to Thorir Hund, with the requirement that Tore provide remedy for the murder of Karle, one of the king's courtiers. Kalv governed Trøndelag under Olaf Haraldsson.

    In 1028, Finn and his brother Arni and Torberg together with Rognvald Brusason went with Olaf Haraldsson into exile in Kievan Rus. They returned with him, fighting at the Battle of Stiklestad in 1030, where Olaf was killed. Kalv Arnesson was one of the leaders of the opposing army.

    Under King Harald, Finn held the manor and lands of Austrått near Ørland in Trøndelag. In 1051, his brother, Kalv, was killed in battle serving King Harald on the island of Funen. Finn believed King Harald had sent Kalv to his death on purpose and turned against the king. He left for Denmark to serve King Sweyn, who made him a jarl and appointed him to rule Halland.

    In 1062, Finn fought in the Battle of Niså (Slaget ved Niså) off the coast of Halland between King Sweyn and King Harald. King Harald was victorious and King Sweyn escaped. However Finn, who refused to flee, was captured. King Harald spared his life and set him free in Halland.

    Personal life
    Finn's daughter Ingibiorg Finnsdottir married Thorfinn Sigurdsson, Earl of Orkney and Máel Coluim mac Donnchada, King of Scots. Another daughter, Sigrid Finnsdatter, married the earl Orm Eilivsson, daughter-son of Haakon Sigurdsson.2

Family: Bergljot Halvdansdottir

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Bergljot Halvdansdottir1

F, #8023

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Earl Finn Arnesson b. c 975

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Arne Arnemodsson1

M, #8024

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Tora Torsteinsdottir1

F, #8025

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Thorstein Gallows1

M, #8026

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Thorstein Gallows was born in Norway*.1
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Alexander MacDonald of Islay, 5th of Dunnyveg1,2

M, #8029, b. 1494, d. 1538

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Alexander MacDonald of Islay, 5th of Dunnyveg was also known as Alexander MacDonnell.5
  • Name-Gaelic: Alexander MacDonald of Islay, 5th of Dunnyveg was also known in Gaelic as Alexander Carragh Mac Domhnaill.3
  • Birth*: He was born in 1494 in Dunnyveg, Islay, Scotland.1,6
  • Marriage*: He married Catherine MacDonald, daughter of John MacDonald of Ardnamurchan and Helen Campbell, circa 1514 in Scotland.7
  • Death*: Alexander MacDonald of Islay, 5th of Dunnyveg died in 1538 in while on a visit to King James V, Stirling, Stirlingshire, Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Alexander Carragh Mac Domhnaill, or MacDonald in Scotland, and McDonnell in Ireland, 5th of Dunnyveg (c. 1480–1538) was a Scoto-Irish chieftain. He was the son of John Cathanach MacDonald, 4th of Dunnyveg and Cecillia Savage, daughter of the Lord of the Ardes.

    After his father and brothers were executed on the Boroughmuir (now Burgh Muir) in 1499, Alexander fled to Ireland. In 1532 Alexander and a force of Gallóglaigh fought the English in Ireland. Alexander died at Stirling while on a visit to King James V of Scotland in 1538 and is buried there.

    Family
    By his wife, Catherine, daughter of John Macdonald of Ardnamurchan and Helen Campbell, their children were:

    Donald MacDonnell, born blind.
    James MacDonald, 6th of Dunnyveg, married Agnes, daughter of Colin Campbell, 3rd Earl of Argyll, died in May 1565, while imprisoned at Castle Crocke, near Strathbane, Ireland.
    Angus MacDonnell, killed during the battle of Glentasie on 2 May 1565.
    Colla MacDonnell, married Evelyn MacQuillan and died in 1558 at Kinbane Castle.
    Sorley Boy MacDonnell, died in 1590 at Dunanynie Castle, Ballycastle.
    Alistair Og MacDonnell, killed in 1566.
    Donald Gorm MacDonnell
    Brian Carrach MacDonnell, killed in 1568.
    Ranold Og MacDonnell
    Meve MacDonnell, who married Hector Maclean of Coll.
    Mary MacDonnell, who married Hector Mor Maclean of Duart.5
  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50588.htm#i505875
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_of_Islay,_Earl_of_Ross#Marriage_and_children
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_MacDonald,_5th_of_Dunnyveg.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_MacDonald,_5th_of_Dunnyveg.
  4. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 38.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_MacDonald,_5th_of_Dunnyveg.
  6. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/108749829/…
  7. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/108749829/…
  8. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 41.
  9. [S924] Rev. George Hill, The MacDonnells of Antrim, page 39, footnote 57.

Marion MacLean of Treshnish1,2

F, #8031, b. circa 1475

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 8 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 127.
  2. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/108749829/…|4|7|tgfjagxhbibdyxr0yw5hy2ggtwfjbgvhbnxnyxjpb24gvhjlc2huaxnoie1hy2xlyw41&mpid=230080665524&nec=1&Hints.hintStatus=Pending.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50588.htm#i505873

(?) MacLean of Treshinish1

M, #8032, b. circa 1450

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family:

  • Last Edited: 1 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50588.htm#i505872
  2. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 127.

Hector 'Odhar' MacLean 6th of Duart, 9th Chief of Clan macLean1,2

M, #8033, b. circa 1455

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Hector 'Odhar' MacLean 6th of Duart, 9th Chief of Clan macLean was born circa 1455 in Duart Castle, Mull, Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married (?) MacKintosh circa 1465 in Scotland.1,2
  • Biography*: Hector Odhar Maclean, or Eachann Odhar Maclean in Scottish Gaelic, or Hector Maclean the Swarthy, was the 9th Chief of Maclean.

    He was the son of Lachlan Og Maclean and has been called Hector Maclean the Swarthy, and sometimes Eachuinn ni num-bristion, on account of his brave and warlike disposition.

    Battle of Bloody Bay
    The times were favorable for the display of his inclinations. Angus Og Macdonald, bastard son of the John of Islay, Earl of Ross, the Lord of the Isles, a man of great natural violence, succeeded in establishing a supremacy over his father, among the chiefs descended from the family of the Isles. These chiefs were easily drawn off, because John of Islay, Earl of Ross, in 1476, gave up the earldom of Ross and the lands of Kintyre and Knapdale, and had made improvident grants of lands to the MacLeans, MacLeods, MacNeills, and some smaller tribes.

    Angus placed himself at the head of the various branches of Clan Donald, and raised the standard of revolt against his father. John of Islay, Earl of Ross went to Stirling, and there, on account of his son's disobedience, resigned all his possessions to the king, except the Barony of Kinloss in Murray, of Kinnaird in Buchan, and of Cairndonald in the West, which he reserved to support his own grandeur during his lifetime. Angus determined not to surrender any of the hereditary possessions to the king, or even to his father himself. Several expeditions sent by the king against Angus proved unsuccessful. The first, under the Earl of Athole, assisted by the MacKenzies, MacKays, and Frasers, was defeated with great slaughter at Lagebread.

    The second expedition, under the Earl of Crawford and Earl of Huntly, made no impression. A third, under Argyle and Athol, accompanied by John, succeeded, through an accommodation, in persuading several tribes to join the royal forces. The two earls appeared to be afraid of attacking Angus, and this expedition resulted in failure. "John, the father, however, undismayed by their pusillanimity, proceeded onward through the Sound of Mull, accompanied by the MacLeans, MacLeods, MacNeills, and others, and having encountered Angus in a bay on the south side of the promontory of Ardnamurchan, a desperate combat ensued, in which Angus was again victorious." This place is near Tobermory, and has since been known as Badh-na-fola, and the conflict is known as the Battle of Bloody Bay.

    Hector Odhar not only headed his clan, but also took his hereditary post of lieutenant-general under the John of Islay, Earl of Ross. A naval engagement was fought with the most rancorous animosity, and prodigious slaughter was committed on both sides. Angus Og Macdonald succeeded in taking prisoner both his father and Hector Odhar Maclean. The result of this battle, fought in 1482, was to establish Angus completely in possession of the extensive territories of his clan.

    Children
    Connection to MacLeans & Leans of Cornwall
    The "legend" of greatest favour, or at least, the one most often quoted suggests that at some time (unknown but late 15th century) two legitimate sons of Hector Odhar, then Lord of Duart Castle on the Isle of Mull, and of the Kingdom of the Western Isles, fought against their father in battle and lost.

    It is said that Clan Law prescribed that these two must leave the Isles, and be denounced from the Clan. This involved the dropping of the "Mac" from their name (Meaning "son of") and getting as far away from possible later retribution as was possible.

    One son was supposed to have made his way to the East, i.e. Edinburgh or Glasgow, whilst the other was said to have "left a trail a mile wide" and travelled as far South as it was possible to go - to Cornwall.

    *Lachlan Maclean, 10th Clan Chief
    Lachlan was an illegitimate son who had the property of 9th Chief entailed to him 1496. In Registrum Secrcti Sigilli, Volume I., folio 29, may be found the " legitimation to Lauchlane McGilleon son natural to Hector McGilleon of Doward. October 1496."2
  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505870
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiefs_of_Clan_Maclean
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505868

(?) MacKintosh1

F, #8034

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 3 Dec 2014

Lachlan 'Og' MacLean 8th Chief of MacLean1

M, #8035, b. circa 1405, d. 22 December 1748

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Lachlan 'Og' MacLean 8th Chief of MacLean was also known as Lachlan 'Og' MacLean 5th of Duart.3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1405 in Duart Castle, Isle of Mull, Argyllshire, Scotland.4,5
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Catherine Campbell, daughter of Colin Campbell 1st Earl of Argyll and Lady Isabel Stewart of Lorn, Countess of Argyle, circa 1460 in Scotland.3,5
  • Death*: Lachlan 'Og' MacLean 8th Chief of MacLean died on 22 December 1748 in Duart Castle, Mull, Argyllshire, Scotland.5
  • Biography*: Lachlan Óg Maclean, was the 8th Chief of Maclean.

    Biography
    He was the son of Lachlan Bronneach Maclean. Lachlan Og was called Lachlan the Younger to distinguish him from his father. He was Lord of Duard and Chief of Clan MacLean when political changes were taking place in the Western Isles. The western chiefs had thought themselves independent of the king, and were obedient only to the Lord of the Isles, who ruled in princely style. In 1448, John of Islay, Earl of Ross became one of the strongest opponents of the king's party. In 1462, he entered into a compact with the banished House of Douglas and the commissioners of England, in which it was stipulated that John, with his vassals and such auxiliaries as would be furnished by Edward IV of England, and the assistance that might be given by the Douglases, should enter upon the conquest of Scotland; that John, Donald Balloch, and John, the sons and heirs of MacDonald, upon the payment of a stipulated sum of money (John, £200 sterling annually in time of war, and one hundred marks in time of peace; to Donald Balloch, £40, and to John, his son, £20, in time of war, and in times of peace half these sums respectively), should become forever the sworn vassals of England, and assist in the wars in Ireland and elsewhere. In the event of the conquest of Scotland, then that kingdom should be equally divided between John, Donald Balloch, and the Earl of Douglas. While these negotiations were still pending, the Lord of the Isles assembled a large force, captured the castle of Inverness, and commenced to assert authority over Inverness, Nairn, Ross, and Caithness. How this extraordinary rebellion was suppressed is uncertain. He was summoned before parliament for treason; and that on failing to appear, the process of forfeiture against him was suspended for a time, and he was allowed to retain undisturbed possession of his estates for about fifteen years. The treaty of 1462 did not come to light until 1475, when the Scottish government determined to proceed against John as an avowed traitor and rebel. Commission was given to Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll, to prosecute a decree of forfeiture against him; and on the appointed day, failing to appear, sentence was passed upon him. So great were the preparations now made against him, that MacDonald sued for pardon, and with much humility surrendered to the king's mercy. He was pardoned and restored to his forfeited estates on July 1, 1476. Soon after, the earldom of Ross and the lands of Kintyre and Knapdale became inalienably annexed to the crown. This caused great dissatisfaction on the part of Angus, the bastard son of MacDonald, a man who was early accustomed to rebellion. The division of the lands also divided the vassals of the Lordship of the Isles, the MacLeans, MacLeods, and MacNeils adhering to John, while the various branches of the Clan MacDonald made common cause with the turbulent heir of the lordship.

    Marriage and children
    He was married to Catherine, daughter of Colin Campbell, 1st Earl of Argyll. His father-in-law and his accomplices were successful in involving the Lord of the Isles in difficulties, and although he did not scruple to misrepresent his son-in-law and brand him as a recreant chief, yet Lachlan's judgment and skill warded off every blow Argyle attempted to inflict.

    Eachann Odhar Maclean, who succeeded him as clan chief

    Fionnaghal Maclean, who was married to Celestine, daughter of MacDonald, Laird of Lochalsh and Lochearron, the marriage of Fionnaghal must have taken place in 1462, for in that year at the Dingwall Castle, February 2, John of the Isles grants to his brother "Celestine de insulis of the lands of Lochalsh, etc., to hold to the said Celestine and the heirs to he gotten between him and Finvola, daughter of Lachlan Mcilleon of Dowart."

    Anne, who was married to William Munro, 12th Baron of Foulis.1
  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2017

Lachlan 'Bronnach' MacLean 4th of Duart, 7th Chief1

M, #8037, b. circa 1379, d. 12 April 1463

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Lachlan 'Bronnach' MacLean 4th of Duart, 7th Chief was born circa 1379 in Duart Castle, Isle of Mull, Argyllshire, Scotland.1,3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Margaret Janet Stewart, daughter of Alexander Stewart 12th Earl of Mar, circa 1432 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Lachlan 'Bronnach' MacLean 4th of Duart, 7th Chief died on 12 April 1463 in Duart Castle, Isle of Mull, Argyllshire, Scotland.5,4
  • Biography*: Lachlan Bronnach MacLean, was the 7th Chief of Clan MacLean

    Biography
    Lachlan, seventh chief of MacLean, received the sobriquet of "Bronnach", or swag-bellied, on account of his corpulence. He was with his father on the fatal field of Harlaw, where he was made prisoner by Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar. During his captivity, he became acquainted with the earl's daughter, the Lady Margaret, whom he afterward married. According to some accounts his estates were managed by his uncle John Maclean during his captivity, while others state it was his brother, John Dubh Maclean. This confusion results from the names of the two being the same. It is not probable that he remained in confinement for any considerable length of time. He did not possess the same war-like character that distinguished his father. He appears neither to have sought, nor avoided war, but was ready for action when the time arrived. His name, however, does not come prominently forward until the year 1427, when a useless war was brought on through the treachery of King James I. This monarch summoned a parliament to meet him at Inverness, in 1427, at which the Highland chiefs were invited to attend. As the chiefs entered the hall in which parliament was assembled, each was immediately arrested and placed in irons in different parts of the building, not one being permitted to communicate with any of the others. Among the number was Alexander MacDonald, 3rd Lord of the Isles, and his mother, the Countess of Ross. Some of the chiefs were immediately beheaded, and the rest sent to various prisons, where after a time some were liberated, and the rest put to death. On his liberation, the young Lord of the Isles set about to avenge this unparalleled outrage, for he keenly felt the indignity of his imprisonment. In 1429, he summoned all his vassals in Ross and the Isles, and advanced against the town of Inverness, which he burnt to the ground, besides wasting the crown lands, in revenge for the treacherous treatment he had received there two years before from the king. King James I immediately placed himself at the head of a large army, and came upon Alexander unexpectedly. The Clan Cameron and Clan Chattan deserted the island lord, who was immediately attacked and defeated. Alexander was forced to surrender unconditionally, when he was imprisoned in Tantallon Castle, and his mother confined in Inchcolm, in the Firth of Forth. Along with him we find in prison Lachlan MacLean and other chieftains.

    Marriage and children
    Before marriage he had a child with the daughter of MacLean of Kingerloch:
    Donald Maclean, 1st Laird of Ardgour sometimes called Mac-Mhic-Eachainn Chinnghearloch. He was born out of wedlock and brought up among his mother's people.
    By his first wife, Margaret, daughter of the Earl of Mar, possibly Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, he had:
    Lachlan Og Maclean, his heir and successor as 8th Clan Chief.
    By his second wife, Fionnaghal, daughter of William MacLeod of Harris, he had two sons:
    Neil Maclean of Ross
    John Garbh Maclean, 1st Laird of Coll.3

Family: Lady Margaret Janet Stewart b. c 1400

  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505866
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505863
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lachlan_Bronneach_Maclean
  4. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505862

Lady Margaret Janet Stewart1

F, #8038, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Lachlan 'Bronnach' MacLean 4th of Duart, 7th Chief b. c 1379, d. 12 Apr 1463

  • Last Edited: 10 Jun 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505866
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505865

Alexander Stewart 12th Earl of Mar1

M, #8039, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Alexander Stewart 12th Earl of Mar was born circa 1375 in Carrick, Argyllshire, Scotland.3,4
  • Biography*: Alexander Stewart (c. 1375 – 1435), Earl of Mar

    Biography
    He was an illegitimate son of Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan and probably Mairead inghean Eachann.

    Alexander held the Earldom of Mar and the Lordship of the Garioch in right of his first wife Isabel Douglas, Countess of Mar (d. 1408). Alexander's marriage to Isabella followed his capture of Kildrummy Castle, and Isabella with it, in 1404. This event sent major shockwaves throughout the kingdom and Alexander only escaped punishment because he was a close relation to the Royal Family. His possession of the Earldom was later regularised in 1424 by grant of his cousin, King James I.

    He was a close supporter of his uncle Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany, who was then ruler of the kingdom as regent for his brother King Robert III of Scotland, after he had been badly injured being kicked by his horse. Alexander led the so-called "Lowland" army, in fact that of the north-east and eastern Highlands, against Domhnall of Islay, Lord of the Isles at the bloody and indecisive battle of Harlaw in 1411.

    Unlike his father, who had been unable to keep the peace in the fractious north-east, Alexander, Walter Bower says, "ruled with acceptance nearly all of the north of the country beyond the Mounth". He achieved this not by using different methods from his father but by his ability to keep his cateran forces in check and to use them to protect his extensive lands when needed; the result was that the lowland areas of Aberdeenshire and Moray were protected.

    Alexander sat on the jury of 21 knights and peers which convicted his cousin, Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany and two of his sons of treason in 1424, leading to the execution of Albany and his sons and the virtual annihilation of his family.

    Marriages and children
    Alexander first married to Isabel Douglas, Countess of Mar (d. 1408). Alexander remarried with Marie van Hoorn, daughter of Willem, Lord of Duffel, in 1410. He died without having a legitimate male heir, and the Earldom of Mar passed to the crown. He had two illegitimate children, Thomas who died childless and Margaret who married Lachlan Maclean of Duart.5

Family:

  • Last Edited: 26 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505865
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lachlan_Bronneach_Maclean
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Stewart,_Earl_of_Buchan.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505865
  4. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Stewart,_Earl_of_Mar.

Eachan 'Ruardh nan Cath' MacLean 3rd of Duart1

M, #8040, b. circa 1380, d. 1411

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Eachan 'Ruardh nan Cath' MacLean 3rd of Duart was born circa 1380 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1411 in Scotland; Killed in the Battle of Harlaw.2
  • Biography*: Red Hector of the Battles Maclean, or Eachann Ruadh nan Cath in Scottish Gaelic, was the 6th Chief of Clan Maclean.

    Biography
    He was the son of Lachlan Lubanach Maclean, and he early distinguished himself by daring exploits, and was noted as being one of the best swordsmen of his time. He became so celebrated as a swordsman, that many knights who had gained for themselves renown came from distant parts to measure weapons with him. One of these was a renowned knight of Norway, who challenged Hector Roy to mortal combat. The challenge was accepted. They met at Saleu, in Mull, where they fought, and where the Norwegian fell. A green mound and cairn on the sea-shore mark the spot where Hector had his antagonist buried.

    There was an old Gaelic poem, which affirmed that Hector commanded a great fleet to the coast of Ireland, and there defeated some of the ships of the King of England. He landed his troops; placed the city of Dublin under contribution; carried fire and sword into the country; destroyed many of his enemies, and burnt their houses. This must be the expedition hinted at in Raphael Holinshed's Chronicle of Ireland where it is recorded that "in the year 1400 at Whitesuntide, the first year of King Henry IV, the constable of Dublin, and divers others at Stanford in Ulster, fought by sea with the Scots, where many Englishmen were slain and drowned."

    Marriage and children
    Hector Roy's marriage to a daughter of the Earl of Douglas, possibly William Douglas, 6th Earl of Douglas, greatly enlarged his influence. That nobleman made many overtures to induce Hector to withdraw himself from his dangerous connection with his uncle Domhnall of Islay, Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross, now on the brink of open war with Robert, Duke of Albany and regent of the kingdom. Hector firmly withstood the blandishments of his father-in-law, for his duty as hereditary Lieutenant-General of the Isles was to his uncle Donald, and the approaching contest afforded a new field for the display of his valor.4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 1 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505863
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505862
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…