King Alfred (?) The Great

M, #7921, b. between 846 and 849

A rare High Medieval image of Alfred, 13th century

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: King Alfred (?) The Great was also known as Aelfraed (?) King of Wessex.4
  • Birth*: He was born between 846 and 849 in Kingdom of Wessex, Wantage, Oxfordshire, England*.4,5
  • Marriage*: He married Eahlswith (?) Princess of Mercia, daughter of Athelred 'Mucil' (?) Ealdorman of the Gainas and Eadburga (?) Princess of Mercia, between 868 and 869 in England.6
  • Biography*: Ælfræd, King of Wessex also went by the nick-name of Alfred 'the Great'. He succeeded to the title of King Ælfræd of Wessex on 23 April 871.

    He helped his brother gain a great victory over the Danes at Ashdown in 871. Alfred organised the army and was the founder of the English Navy. By 877 the Danes had occupied London and reached Gloucester and Exeter, but they lost 120 supply ships in a fierce storm off Swanage. In 878 he was forced to hide in Somerset and it was there arose the legend of the burned cakes. He renewed the fight and won a famous victory at Edington in Wiltshire the same year. After, the Danes agreed that their king, Guthrum, should be baptised and Alfred was godfather. Afterwards Guthrum ruled Mercia but acknowledged Alfred as Overlord. The Mercian settlement developed over the next 100 years into the body known as Danelaw. Before that, in 879 at Fulham and also near Rochester in 884, other Norse armies landed. Alfred continued fighting until he was the acknowledged champion of the English against the Danes. Alfred was scholarly, a writer, law-maker, pious and also a valiant fighter. Additionally he had a good knowledge of geography. He was a most able administrator and also instituted educational programmes. He founded monasteries and gave a large part of his income to charities.

    Alfred the Great (Old English: Ælfred, Ælfr?d, "elf counsel"; 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex from 871 to 899.

    Alfred successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and by his death had become the dominant ruler in England. He is the only English monarch to be accorded the epithet "the Great". Alfred was the first King of the West Saxons to style himself "King of the Anglo-Saxons". Details of his life are described in a work by the 10th century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser. Alfred was a learned and merciful man who encouraged education and improved his kingdom's legal system and military structure.

    Alfred was born in the village of Wanating, now Wantage, Oxfordshire. He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of Wessex, by his first wife, Osburh.

    In 853, at the age of four, Alfred is said to have been sent to Rome where, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he was confirmed by Pope Leo IV who "anointed him as king". Victorian writers interpreted this as an anticipatory coronation in preparation for his ultimate succession to the throne of Wessex. However, his succession could not have been foreseen at the time, as Alfred had three living elder brothers. A letter of Leo IV shows that Alfred was made a "consul"; a misinterpretation of this investiture, deliberate or accidental, could explain later confusion. It may also be based on Alfred's later having accompanied his father on a pilgrimage to Rome where he spent some time at the court of Charles the Bald, King of the Franks, around 854–855.

    On their return from Rome in 856, Æthelwulf was deposed by his son Æthelbald. With civil war looming, the magnates of the realm met in council to hammer out a compromise. Æthelbald would retain the western shires (i.e., traditional Wessex), and Æthelwulf would rule in the east.

    When King Æthelwulf died in 858, Wessex was ruled by three of Alfred's brothers in succession, Æthelbald, Æthelbert and Æthelred.

    Bishop Asser tells the story of how as a child Alfred won a prize of a volume of poetry in English, offered by his mother to the first of her children able to memorise it. Legend also has it that the young Alfred spent time in Ireland seeking healing. Alfred was troubled by health problems throughout his life. It is thought that he may have suffered from Crohn's disease. Statues of Alfred in Winchester and Wantage portray him as a great warrior. Evidence suggests he was not physically strong, and though not lacking in courage, he was more noted for his intellect than a warlike character.

    Under Æthelred
    During the short reigns of the older two of his three elder brothers, Æthelbald of Wessex and Æthelberht of Wessex, Alfred is not mentioned. However, his public life began with the accession of his third brother, Æthelred of Wessex, in 866. It is during this period that Bishop Asser applied to him the unique title of "secundarius", which may indicate a position akin to that of the Celtic tanist, a recognised successor closely associated with the reigning monarch. It is possible that this arrangement was sanctioned by Alfred's father, or by the Witan, to guard against the danger of a disputed succession should Æthelred fall in battle. The arrangement of crowning a successor as royal prince and military commander is well known among other Germanic tribes, such as the Swedes and Franks, to whom the Anglo-Saxons were closely related.

    In 868, Alfred is recorded as fighting beside Æthelred in an unsuccessful attempt to keep the invading Danes led by Ivar the Boneless out of the adjoining Kingdom of Mercia. However, at the end of 870, the Danes arrived in his homeland. The year which followed has been called "Alfred's year of battles". Nine engagements were fought with varying outcomes, though the place and date of two of these battles have not been recorded.

    In Berkshire, a successful skirmish at the Battle of Englefield on 31 December 870 was followed by a severe defeat at the siege and Battle of Reading by Ivar's brother Halfdan Ragnarsson on 5 January 871; then, four days later, Alfred won a brilliant victory at the Battle of Ashdown on the Berkshire Downs, possibly near Compton or Aldworth. Alfred is particularly credited with the success of this latter battle. However, later that month, on 22 January, the English were defeated at the Battle of Basing and, on the 22 March at the Battle of Merton (perhaps Marden in Wiltshire or Martin in Dorset), in which Æthelred was killed. The two unidentified battles may have occurred in between.

    King at war
    Early struggles, defeat and flight
    n April 871, King Æthelred died, and Alfred succeeded to the throne of Wessex and the burden of its defence, despite the fact that Æthelred left two under-age sons, Æthelhelm and Æthelwold. This was in accordance with the agreement that Æthelred and Alfred had made earlier that year in an assembly at Swinbeorg. The brothers had agreed that whichever of them outlived the other would inherit the personal property that King Æthelwulf had left jointly to his sons in his will. The deceased's sons would receive only whatever property and riches their father had settled upon them and whatever additional lands their uncle had acquired. The unstated premise was that the surviving brother would be king. Given the ongoing Danish invasion and the youth of his nephews, Alfred's succession probably went uncontested. Tensions between Alfred and his nephews, however, would arise later in his reign.

    While he was busy with the burial ceremonies for his brother, the Danes defeated the English in his absence at an unnamed spot, and then again in his presence at Wilton in May. The defeat at Wilton smashed any remaining hope that Alfred could drive the invaders from his kingdom. He was forced, instead, to ‘make peace’ with them. The sources do not tell what the terms of the peace were. Bishop Asser claimed that the 'pagans' agreed to vacate the realm and made good their promise; and, indeed, the Viking army did withdraw from Reading in the autumn of 871 to take up winter quarters in Mercian London. Although not mentioned by Asser or by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Alfred probably also paid the Vikings cash to leave, much as the Mercians were to do in the following year. Hoards dating to the Viking occupation of London in 871/2 have been excavated at Croydon, Gravesend, and Waterloo Bridge; these finds hint at the cost involved in making peace with the Vikings. For the next five years, the Danes occupied other parts of England.

    In 876 under their new leader, Guthrum, the Danes slipped past the English army and attacked and occupied Wareham in Dorset. Alfred blockaded them but was unable to take Wareham by assault. Accordingly, he negotiated a peace which involved an exchange of hostages and oaths, which the Danes swore on a "holy ring" associated with the worship of Thor. The Danes, however, broke their word and, after killing all the hostages, slipped away under cover of night to Exeter in Devon. There, Alfred blockaded them, and with a relief fleet having been scattered by a storm, the Danes were forced to submit. They withdrew to Mercia, but, in January 878, made a sudden attack on Chippenham, a royal stronghold in which Alfred had been staying over Christmas, "and most of the people they killed, except the King Alfred, and he with a little band made his way by wood and swamp, and after Easter he made a fort at Athelney in the marshes of Somerset, and from that fort kept fighting against the foe". From his fort at Athelney, an island in the marshes near North Petherton, Alfred was able to mount an effective resistance movement, rallying the local militias from Somerset, Wiltshire and Hampshire.

    A popular legend, originating from 12th century chronicles, tells how when he first fled to the Somerset Levels, Alfred was given shelter by a peasant woman who, unaware of his identity, left him to watch some cakes she had left cooking on the fire. Preoccupied with the problems of his kingdom, Alfred accidentally let the cakes burn.

    870 was the low-water mark in the history of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. With all the other kingdoms having fallen to the Vikings, Wessex alone was still resisting.

    Counterattack and victory
    n the seventh week after Easter [4–10 May 878], around Whitsuntide, Alfred rode to ‘Egbert's Stone’ east of Selwood, where he was met by "all the people of Somerset and of Wiltshire and of that part of Hampshire which is on this side of the sea [that is, west of Southampton Water], and they rejoiced to see him". Alfred’s emergence from his marshland stronghold was part of a carefully planned offensive that entailed raising the fyrds of three shires. This meant not only that the king had retained the loyalty of ealdormen, royal reeves and king’s thegns (who were charged with levying and leading these forces), but that they had maintained their positions of authority in these localities well enough to answer his summons to war. Alfred’s actions also suggest a finely honed system of scouts and messengers.

    Alfred won a decisive victory in the ensuing Battle of Ethandun, which may have been fought near Westbury, Wiltshire. He then pursued the Danes to their stronghold at Chippenham and starved them into submission. One of the terms of the surrender was that Guthrum convert to Christianity; and three weeks later the Danish king and 29 of his chief men were baptised at Alfred's court at Aller, near Athelney, with Alfred receiving Guthrum as his spiritual son. The "unbinding of the chrism" took place with great ceremony eight days later at the royal estate at Wedmore in Somerset, after which Guthrum fulfilled his promise to leave Wessex.

    There is no contemporary evidence that Alfred and Guthrum agreed upon a formal treaty at this time; the so-called Treaty of Wedmore is an invention of modern historians. The Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum, preserved in Old English in Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (Manuscript 383), and in a Latin compilation known as Quadripartitus, was negotiated later, perhaps in 879 or 880, when King Ceolwulf II of Mercia was deposed. That treaty divided up the kingdom of Mercia. By its terms the boundary between Alfred’s and Guthrum’s kingdoms was to run up the River Thames, to the River Lea; follow the Lea to its source (near Luton); from there extend in a straight line to Bedford; and from Bedford follow the River Ouse to Watling Street. In other words, Alfred succeeded to Ceolwulf’s kingdom, consisting of western Mercia; and Guthrum incorporated the eastern part of Mercia into an enlarged kingdom of East Anglia (henceforward known as the Danelaw). By terms of the treaty, moreover, Alfred was to have control over the Mercian city of London and its mints — at least for the time being. The disposition of Essex, held by West Saxon kings since the days of Egbert, is unclear from the treaty, though, given Alfred’s political and military superiority, it would have been surprising if he had conceded any disputed territory to his new godson.

    FOR ADDITIONAL HISTORY go to:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great.7
  • Last Edited: 10 Nov 2015

Eahlswith (?) Princess of Mercia1,2

F, #7922, b. circa 852, d. 5 December 905

Ealhswith
Wife of Alfred the Great
Consort of the King of Wessex

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Eahlswith (?) Princess of Mercia was born circa 852 in England.4
  • Marriage*: She married King Alfred (?) The Great, son of Aethelwulf (?) King of Wessex and Osburh (?) Queen of Wessex, between 868 and 869 in England.1
  • Death*: Eahlswith (?) Princess of Mercia died on 5 December 905 in Winchester, Hampshire, England.3
  • Burial*: She was buried after 5 December 905 in St. Mary's Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.3
  • Biography*: She gained the title of Princess of Mercia. She was a nun circa 901 at St. Mary's Abbey, Winchester, Hampshire, England.

    Ealhswith or Ealswitha (died 5 December 902) was the wife of King Alfred the Great. Her father was a Mercian nobleman, Æthelred Mucil (or Mucel), Ealdorman of the Gaini, which is thought to be an old Mercian tribal group. Her mother was Eadburh, a member of the Mercian royal family, and according to the historian Cyril Hart she was a descendant of King Cenwulf of Mercia.

    Life
    She was married to Alfred in 868. His elder brother Æthelred was then king, and Alfred was regarded as heir apparent. The Danes occupied the Mercian town of Nottingham in that year, and the marriage was probably connected with an alliance between Wessex and Mercia. Alfred became king on his brother's death in 871.

    Ealhswith is very obscure in contemporary sources. She did not witness any known charters, and Asser did not even mention her name in his life of King Alfred. In accordance with ninth century West Saxon custom, she was not given the title of queen. According to King Alfred, this was because of the infamous conduct of a former queen of Wessex called Eadburh, who had accidentally poisoned her husband.

    Alfred left his wife three important symbolic estates in his will, Edington in Wiltshire, the site of one important victory over the Vikings, Lambourn in Berkshire, which was near another, and Wantage, his birthplace. These were all part of his bookland, and they stayed in royal possession after her death.

    It was probably after Alfred's death in 899 that Ealhswith founded the convent of St Mary's Abbey, Winchester, known as the Nunnaminster. She died on 5 December 902, and was buried in her son Edward's new Benedictine abbey, the New Minster, Winchester. She is commemorated in two early tenth century manuscripts as "the true and dear lady of the English".

    Children
    Alfred and Ealhswith had five children who survived to adulthood.
    Æthelflæd (d. 918), Lady of the Mercians, married Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians
    Edward the Elder (d. 924), King of the Anglo-Saxons
    Æthelgifu, made abbess of her foundation at Shaftesbury by her father
    Ælfthryth, Countess of Flanders (d. 929), married Baldwin II, Count of Flanders
    Æthelweard (d. c.920.)3,2
  • Last Edited: 9 Nov 2015

Allan MacIldny Cameron 12th of Lochiel1,2

M, #7923, b. circa 1425, d. 1480

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Allan MacIldny Cameron 12th of Lochiel was born circa 1425 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Mariot MacDonnell of Keppoch circa 1470 in Scotland.4
  • Death*: Allan MacIldny Cameron 12th of Lochiel died in 1480 in Scotland; Killed in battle in 1480 fighting the Mackintoshes and MacDonalds of Keppoch.2

Family: Lady Mariot MacDonnell of Keppoch b. c 1450, d. c 1530

  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50615.htm#i506145
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiefs_of_Clan_Cameron
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p19951.htm#i199510
  4. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/108749829/…
  5. [S927] F.S.A., Scot Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacLeods, page 25.

Donald Dubh Cameron 11th of Lochiel1

M, #7924, b. circa 1375

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Donald Dubh Cameron 11th of Lochiel was born circa 1375 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Unknown heiress (?) MacMartin circa 1425 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Rose up in support of MacDonald, Lord of the Isles at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411.1

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 23 Jul 2017

Allan MacOchtery Cameron 9th of Lochiel1

M, #7925, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Lady Isabel Drummond b. c 1350, d. c 1420

  • Last Edited: 23 Jul 2017

John Ochtery Cameron 8th of Lochiel1

M, #7926, b. circa 1290

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John Ochtery Cameron 8th of Lochiel was born circa 1290 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Elaine Mowat circa 1350 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Said to have led the clan at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333.1
  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2017

John MacLean 3rd of Lochbuie1

M, #7927, b. circa 1420

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Elizabeth MacKay

  • Last Edited: 3 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50615.htm#i506142
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50555.htm#i505543
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiefs_of_Clan_Cameron

Elizabeth MacKay1

F, #7928

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: John MacLean 3rd of Lochbuie b. c 1420

  • Last Edited: 3 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50615.htm#i506142
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50555.htm#i505548
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiefs_of_Clan_Cameron

Murdoch MacLean 2nd of Lochbuie1

M, #7929, b. circa 1360

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 3 Dec 2014

(daughter) MacLeod1

F, #7930, b. circa 1400

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 4 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50555.htm#i505543
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50555.htm#i505542

Hector Reaganach MacLean 1st of Lochbuie1,2

M, #7931, b. circa 1330, d. 1407

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Hector Reaganach MacLean 1st of Lochbuie was born circa 1330 in Isle of Mull, Scotland.1,4
  • Marriage*: He married Christina MacLeod, daughter of Murdoch MacLeod, circa 1360 in Scotland.1,5,4
  • Death*: Hector Reaganach MacLean 1st of Lochbuie died in 1407 in Scotland.4
  • Biography*: Hector Reaganach Maclean or Hector the Stern, was the first laird and the founder of the Macleans of Lochbuie. He was a son of John Dubh MacLean, 4th Clan Chief. He was a noted warrior in his day, and between him and his brother Lachlan always existed a strong affection, and were never separated in their warlike expeditions. Some of his exploits have already been noticed.

    It is related that when Hector went to Lochbuie he found the lands possessed by the chief of MacFadyean, and obtained permission to build a fort or keep at the head of Lochbuie. When it was completed Hector ascended to the top, and, taking a bow and arrow, took aim at a bone MacFadyean was then eating from, and pierced it with the arrow. MacFadyean simply remarked," It is time I was leaving" took his departure, and gave Hector no trouble.

    It is possible that Hector built in part Moy Castle. In the lower part it bears marks of a high antiquity, and at the time it was possessed by Hector may have been in a ruined condition. It is now one of the best preserved castles in the Hebrides, and until within the last few years its roof was kept entire. It is located on a low rock nearly midway across the head of the bay, and at high tide its base is washed by the sea. For the most part it is built of flat stones, thoroughly cemented together, being broadest at the base. The gate or door-way faces the north, and was formerly protected by a fosse. The gateway is protected by a wooden door, which swings inward; and in turn is guarded by an iron grating on hinges, which again is secured by a wooden beam built into the wall, which may be moved at will, but can not be taken out of the wall. In the wall, to the west, is a recess, where the gateman was constantly stationed. The floor of the interior of the first story is a solid rock, in the center of which is a basin four feet in depth, which is always full of water, but never overflows. Where the water comes from is unknown. In the east wall is a passage-way leading to the stairs, which passes through the east wall to the south-east corner of the second story. From that point upward the stairway is spiral, all of the steps composed of stone. Over the first passage-way, and in the wall, is the vault which held the dead during the funeral obsequies. The second and third floors are formed of solid stone arches. The second story was the judgment hall, and just off from it, and within the east wall, is the chapel, which is reached by a door-way from the spiral stairs. In the south-west corner is the dungeon, which extends from the second floor down to the level of the ground floor. It does not admit of a ray of light, and so constructed as to contain water, and on the floor is placed a single stone, upon which the prisoner must stand, or else drown. Where the water comes from is unknown. There is an escape to prevent an overflow. The third floor was the banqueting hall. The fourth and fifth stories had their floors composed of wood. Here chimneys, fireplaces, and windows may be seen. On the summit, at the north side, is a parapet, where a watchman was constantly on duty. The height of the castle is fifty-five feet, and on the north and the south sides the walls, on the exterior, are thirty-two feet; on the east and west sides, thirty-seven feet. At all places the walls are seven feet in thickness. Hector Reaganach received his charter from the Lord of the Isles, and hence was feudally independent of Duard.

    History

    Clan Maclaine of Lochbuie is translated in Gaelic as Mac'ill-Eathain Locchabuide, but their history can be traced back farther than the Gaels to Tuscany in Italy. A Tuscan follower of William the Conqueror had a grandson named Maurice Fitzgerald, who moved to Ireland with the famous Earl of Surrey, known as "Strongbow." The Fitzgeralds of Ireland sent offshoots to Scotland in the thirteenth century. Two Fitzgerald cousins are said to have started both Clan MacLean and Clan Mackenzie, with the name MacLean being coined by Gillean-na-Taughe (Gillean of the Battle-Axe), a fierce warrior who lived in the thirteenth century. Gillean was said to have signed the Ragman Roll in 1296 as "Gilliemore Macilean" or "Gillean the Great, Son of Gillean." He and his three sons were also said to have fought against the Vikings at the Battle of Largs in 1263. Gillean's great-grandson, Iain Dubh, or Black John, had two sons, Eachin Reaganach (Hector the Stern), and Lachainn Lubanach (Lachlan the Wily). When the Gaelic Highlanders broke away from the Lowland monarchy in the 14th century, the MacLeans allied with the Highlanders - receiving lands from John, Lord of the Isles, in exchange for their support. Lachlan married John's daughter, and he and his brother moved to the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides, where the two dominant branches of the family were formed: the Maclaines of Lochbuie and the MacLeans of Duart (The Maclaines of Lochbuie used the "MacLean" spelling until the 17th century). Lachlan was the head of the Duart branch, with Hector being the head of the Lochbuie branch. Many of the clansmen at Lochbuie retained other spellings of Maclaine or MacLean, such as Maclayne, McClain, and McLain. Various smaller families intermarried or banded together with the Maclaines, and they were all accepted into the clan.

    Once the MacLeans allied with the Highlanders, they expanded beyond Lochbuie and Duart to Ardgower, Morvern, and Coll. Clan MacDonald, arguably the most powerful highland clan, became envious of the growing power of the MacLeans; and subsequently, the MacLeans - including the Maclaines of Lochbuie - feuded with the MacDonalds for many years.

    Historically Roman Catholic and proud to see a Scottish monarch on the throne, the Maclaines of Lochbuie, along with the MacLeans, fought on the side of the Royalists in the English Civil War against Oliver Cromwell and his Parliamentarians. However, the Maclaines of Lochbuie and other clans were persuaded by Duncan Forbes not to rise with Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745. Thus the Maclaines and MacLeans were spared the ramifications that resulted throughout northern Scotland as a result of Charles' defeat at the Battle of Culloden. The Maclaines later on converted to Presbyterianism as a result of the rising influence of that denomination in the lowlands.

    During the American Revolution, many Highland regiments were raised in Scotland, and rarely one of them was formed that did not consist of a MacLean or a Maclaine. The period of colonization before the Revolution saw many Maclaines and MacLeans settle in the sandhills of eastern North Carolina, and these settlers were almost all British sympathizers during the war.2,4
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50554.htm#i505531
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hector_Reaganach_Maclean,_1st_Laird_of_Lochbuie.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50553.htm#i505528
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Maclaine_of_Lochbuie
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50555.htm#i505543

Christina MacLeod1

F, #7932

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 3 Dec 2014

Murdoch MacLeod1

M, #7933

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Murdoch MacLeod was born in Scotland.2
  • Last Edited: 6 Jan 2013

John 'Dubh' MacLean 1st of Duart, 4th Chief of Clan MacLean1,2

M, #7934, b. circa 1300

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name-Gaelic: John 'Dubh' MacLean 1st of Duart, 4th Chief of Clan MacLean was also known in Gaelic as Iain Dubh mac Gilliemore.4
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1300 in Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage: He married (daughter) Comyn circa 1330 in Scotland.1,2
  • Biography: John Dubh Maclean, or Iain Dubh mac Gilliemore in Scottish Gaelic, or John Maclean the black was the 4th Chief of Clan MacLean.

    Biography
    John succeeded his father as chief of the clan. He was known as Iain Dubh Maclean, or Black John Maclean. He married a daughter of Cumming, Lord of the Braes of Lodiaber. He undoubtedly had large possessions, particularly the lands of Duard and Lochbuy, of which the Lord of the Isles was his feudal superior.

    He had three sons:
    Hector Reaganach Maclean, 1st Laird of Lochbuie, or Hector the Stern, was the progenitor of the Lochbuie Macleans.
    Lachlan Lubanach Maclean of Duart, or Lachlan the Wily
    John Maclean, an illegitimate son and is considered the progenitor of the mainland Macleans of Lorn, Ardgour and Morvern.
    .
    It would appear that John designed the lands of Duard for Lachlan, and those of Lochbuy for Hector. Such, at least, was the way in which they were disposed of. These two brothers made a considerable figure during the reigns of Robert II of Scotland and Robert III of Scotland. The prominence of their father, as well as their own affable behavior and pleasing manners, gained for them the friendship of John, First Lord of the Isles, in so much so, that it excited the jealousy of the courtiers, among whom the chief of MacKinnon, the master of the household, became a most inveterate enemy. In order to accomplish his revenge, or satiate his jealousy, he determined to cut the brothers off by taking their lives, while they were hunting with Lord John. Having been warned of MacKinnon's designs, the brothers easily thwarted his plans. Shortly afterward MacDonald (Lord of the Isles) started on some expedition from his castle at Arc's in Mull to the mainland, intending to remain for a season at his castle of Ardtornish in Morvern. MacKinnon, having been unavoidably detained, was to follow after, but, meeting the two brothers, he renewed the quarrel between them. Both parties were well armed, and had their retainers. In the affray which took place MacKinnon was killed while in the act of mounting into his galley, and his followers dispersed. Skene calls this "one of the most daring actions which has ever been recorded of any Highland chief." His version, however, is somewhat different from the above. Not knowing how the Lord of the Isles would take the death of the master of his household, they resolved to apply heroic measures, and keep by force that friendship which they thought might now be forfeited. They now proceeded to follow up their act by one still more daring. Immediately they manned MacKinnon's galley with their own men, and started in pursuit of John, whom they overtook a short distance from Ardtornish, captured his vessel, and carried him prisoner to one of the Garvelloch islands. Here he was detained until he solemnly promised them to remain their true friend.

    Death
    He died during the reign of Robert II of Scotland.4

Family 1:

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505860
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dubh_Maclean,_4th_Chief.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50587.htm#i505858
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p50553.htm#i505528

(?) Maclaine of Lochbuie1

M, #7935

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: (?) Maclaine of Lochbuie was born in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Clan Mclaine of Lochbuie is a Scottish Clan that inhabited lands on the southern end of the Isle of Mull in the Inner Hebrides of the western Scottish Highlands. "Mclaine" is an alternate spelling for "McLean." Clan Mclaine of Lochbuie and Clan Maclean of Duart are two separate clans. However, the two clans share a strong family connection.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Sir Gilchrist Mure of Rowallan1

M, #7936, b. circa 1200, d. circa 1260

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Isabel Comyn b. c 1225

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4661
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4662
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4661
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4662

Isabel Comyn1

F, #7937, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Gilchrist Mure of Rowallan b. c 1200, d. c 1260

  • Last Edited: 14 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4661
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4663
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella,_Countess_of_Menteith.

Sir Walter Comyn1

M, #7938, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Walter Comyn was born circa 1200 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Isabella (?) Countess of Menteith, daughter of Muireadach II (?) Mormaer of Menteith, circa 1225 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Walter Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, jure uxoris Earl of Menteith (died 1258) was the son of William Comyn, Justiciar of Scotia and Mormaer or Earl of Buchan by right of his second wife.

    Life
    Walter makes his first appearance in royal charters as early as 1211–1214. In 1220, he accompanied King Alexander II of Scotland during the latter's visit to York. He appears as "Lord of Badenoch" as early as 1229, after the defeat of the Meic Uilleim by his father. Like his father, Walter was given the hand of an heiress, Isabella, Countess of Menteith. By 1234, Isabella had inherited the Mormaerdom of Menteith, and so Walter became Mormaer or Earl of Menteith by right of his wife (jure uxoris). Walter appears to have had a son named Henry who witnessed a charter, dated to 1250, of Maol Domhnaich, Mormaer of Lennox. His daughter Isabel was given in marriage to Gilchrist Mure.

    Walter was one of the leading political figures in the Kingdom of Scotland, especially during the minority of King Alexander III, when, along with Alan Durward, he essentially ran the country. He died suddenly in either the October or November of 1258. By this time, his son Henry must have been dead. Isabella remained countess until 1260–1261, when Walter Stewart, husband of Isabella's sister Mary, seized the province. As Walter had no surviving male children, the Lordship of Badenoch passed to Walter's nephew John. John was unable to inherit Menteith.

    He is remembered primarily in the proverbial expression Walter of Guiyock's curse, encountered in Sir Walter Scott's Rob Roy, under the English and Lowland form of his name, Walter Cuming, where it appears in chapter 29:
    ... and that they shuld dee the death of Walter Cuming of Guiyock, wha hadna as muckle o'him left thegither as would supper a messan-dog...

    The origin of this is related in Sir Walter Scott's note at that page:
    A great feudal oppressor, who, riding on some cruel purpose through the forest of Guiyock, was thrown from his horse, and his foot being caught in the stirrup, was dragged along by the frightened animal till he was torn to pieces. The expression, “Walter of Guiyock’s curse,” is proverbial.

    An accident such as this was supposed to be a curse akin to that dealt upon Walter Cuming for his sins. It was thus that the expression originated.4

Family: Isabella (?) Countess of Menteith b. 1217, d. 1272

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4663
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch#Family_tree.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabella,_Countess_of_Menteith.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.

Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan1

M, #7939, b. circa 1180

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Isabel Cumming

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4662

Isabel Cumming1

F, #7940

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan b. c 1180

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4662
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p27209.htm#i272084

Sir Walter Cumming1

M, #7941

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Walter Cumming was born in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p27209.htm#i272084

John Grant 2nd of Freuchie1

M, #7943, b. circa 1464, d. 3 June 1528

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Lady Elizabeth Margaret Ogilvy of Deskford & Findlater b. c 1470

  • Last Edited: 17 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p23158.htm#i231578
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18867.htm#i188669
  3. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.
  4. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 109.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18867.htm#i188669
  6. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 110.
  7. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page 71.
  8. [S1159] The Red Book of Scotland Project, online http://redbookofscotland.co.uk, http://redbookofscotland.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/…
  9. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/family
  10. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…

Sir John 'Mor' Grant of Freuchie1,2

M, #7944, b. 1439, d. 16 September 1482

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Muriel Mackintosh b. c 1440, d. 1485

  • Last Edited: 11 Aug 2017

Citations

  1. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 109.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18866.htm#i188654
  3. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18867.htm#i188669
  5. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 183.
  6. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…
  7. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18866.htm#i188654
  8. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56243.htm#i562425

Muriel Mackintosh1

F, #7945, b. circa 1440, d. 1485

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir John 'Mor' Grant of Freuchie b. 1439, d. 16 Sep 1482

  • Last Edited: 29 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18867.htm#i188669
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18867.htm#i188667
  3. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.
  4. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/person/…
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p18866.htm#i188654
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p56243.htm#i562425

Sir Duncan Grant 1st of Freuchie1

M, #7946, b. 1413, d. 1485

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir Duncan Grant 1st of Freuchie was born in 1413 in Freuchie, Scotland.3,4
  • Death*: He died in 1485 in Scotland.4
  • Biography*: The next available reference is of Duncan le Grant in 1434, and later, Sir Duncan Grant of Freuchie (Castle Grant), who inherited land in Dulnain valley in upper Speyside from his mother, Matilda of Glencarnie. Her family had partially owned it since 1180, when Richard I of England gave Kinveachy (approximately ten miles southwest of Castle Grant) to Gilbert, 3rd Earl of Strathearn.5

Family:

  • Last Edited: 4 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p18866.htm#i188654
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643
  3. [S822] Walter MacFarlane of that Ilk MacFarlane's Genealogical Collections Vol. I, page 109.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Grant
  6. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.

Sir John Roy Grant1

M, #7947, b. circa 1390

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Matilda (?) of Glencarnie b. c 1390, d. 31 Jan 1434

  • Last Edited: 4 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643
  3. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1081.htm#i10806

Matilda (?) of Glencarnie1

F, #7948, b. circa 1390, d. 31 January 1434

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir John Roy Grant b. c 1390

  • Last Edited: 4 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p6943.htm#i69423
  3. [S926] William Fraser L.L.D., The Chiefs of Grant Memoirs, page ix.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10965.htm#i109643

William Sinclair 1st Earl of Caithness1

M, #7949, b. 1410, d. before 21 May 1480

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Sinclair 1st Earl of Caithness was born in 1410 in Scotland.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Marjory Sutherland, daughter of Alexander Sutherland and Marion MacDonald of the Isles, before 15 November 1456 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: William Sinclair 1st Earl of Caithness died before 21 May 1480 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He was created 1st Lord Sinclair [Scotland] in 1449. In 1453 he founded the Collegiate Church of Rosslyn, Midlothian. He held the office of High Chancellor [Scotland] between 1454 and 1458.4 He was created 1st Earl of Caithness [Scotland] on 28 August 1455, in settlement of a claim to the Lordship of Nithsdale through his mother. He resigned as Earl of Orkney on 16 September 1470 to King James III under duress, Orkney having been part of the latter’s wife’s dowry, receiving in exchange Ravenscraig Castle, Fife, and its lands. He held the office of Scottish Ambassor to England between 1471 and 1473.4 He resigned as Earl of Caithness on 2 December 1476 in favour of his third son, William (reserving a life rent), and resigned Rosslyn estate in favour of his second son, Oliver.

    William Sinclair (1410–1484), 1st Earl of Caithness (1455–1476), 3rd Earl of Orkney (1455–1470), Baron of Roslin was a Scottish nobleman and the builder of Rosslyn Chapel, in Midlothian.

    Life
    He was the grandson of Henry Sinclair, 1st Earl of Orkney and son of Henry Sinclair, 2nd Earl of Orkney, for a time protector of the young James Stewart, the later James I of Scotland. He was Lord High Admiral of Scotland, and was Lord Chancellor of Scotland from 1454 to 1456. He became the first Lord St. Clair in Scotland in 1449.

    He made several big territorial transactions during his life.

    The first important one was the exchange of his inherited lordship of Nithsdale to the estates of the earldom of Caithness - which soon led to his obtaining the title of Earl in the peerage of Scotland.

    King James III gained his hold and rights of the Norwegian Earldom of Orkney for the Scottish Crown in 1470 (see History of Orkney), against a promised compensation (it turned out to be lands of Ravencraig, in 1471); and William Sinclair was thereafter Earl of Caithness alone until he resigned the Earldom in favour of his son William in 1476.

    In 1471 James bestowed the castle and lands of Ravenscraig in Fife on William Sinclair, in exchange for all his rights to the earldom of Orkney, which, by an Act of the Parliament of Scotland, passed on 20 February 1472, was annexed to the Scottish crown.

    Family
    He was married three times, first to Lady Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas; secondly to Marjory Sutherland, daughter of Alexander Sutherland, and lastly to Janet Yeman.

    He fathered two known children with Lady Elizabeth Douglas. Their son (William Sinclair, 2nd Lord St. Clair) was, in the opinion of the father, a wastrel, whereby he was disinherited. His family received only the Castle of Ravenscraig in Fife. Their daughter (Elizabeth Sinclair) would marry Andrew Leslie, Master of Rothes.

    He fathered four known children with Marjory Sutherland: Eleanor Sinclair, Catherine Sinclair, Sir Oliver Sinclair, and William Sinclair, 2nd Earl of Caithness.

    The earl's third son, (William Sinclair, 2nd Earl of Caithness), of his second marriage became the designated heir of the Earldom of Caithness and continued that title. The Barony of Roslin went to his second son, Sir Oliver Sinclair.

    All in all, the Sinclair ancestry is well and thoroughly represented in Scottish and British high nobility, thanks to marriages of his daughters and other descendants.

    William's daughter of his second marriage, Lady Eleanor Sinclair, married John Stewart, 1st Earl of Atholl, a relative of the kings. Lord Henry Darnley and his son James VI of Scotland descend from Eleanor, and through them, quite a many royal house of Europe. His other daughter by this marriage, Katherine Sinclair, married Alexander Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany, a nephew of the said Atholl.2,5

Family: Marjory Sutherland

  • Last Edited: 14 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10595.htm#i105949
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10829.htm#i108286
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10595.htm#i105949
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10829.htm#i108286
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_I_Sinclair,_Earl_of_Orkney.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Sinclair,_1st_Earl_of_Caithness.
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Sinclair,_2nd_Earl_of_Caithness.

Marjory Sutherland1

F, #7950

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: William Sinclair 1st Earl of Caithness b. 1410, d. b 21 May 1480

  • Last Edited: 14 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10595.htm#i105949
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10921.htm#i109201
  3. [S861] Ancestry.com, online www.ancestry.com, https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/108749829/family
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10595.htm#i105949
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10829.htm#i108286
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Sinclair,_2nd_Earl_of_Caithness.