Donald III 'Donald Bane' (?) King of the Scots1

M, #7621, b. circa 1033, d. 1099

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Donald III 'Donald Bane' (?) King of the Scots was born circa 1033 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1099 in Rescobie, Angus, Scotland; after being blinded by his successor.2
  • Biography*: He gained the title of Earl of Gowrie circa 1060. He gained the title of King Donald III of Scotland on 13 November 1093. He was deposed as King of Scotland in May 1094. He gained the title of King Donald III of Scotland on 12 November 1094.1 He was deposed as King of Scotland in October 1097.

    Donald III (Medieval Gaelic: Domnall mac Donnchada; Modern Gaelic: Dòmhnall mac Dhonnchaidh), and nicknamed "Donald the Fair" or "Donald the White" (Medieval Gaelic:"Domnall Bán", anglicised as Donald Bane/Bain or Donalbane/Donalbain), (died 1099) was King of Scots from 1093–1094 and 1094–1097.

    Life
    Donald was born in 1033, during the reign of his great-grandfather King Malcolm II. He was the second known son of Prince Duncan, who was the grandson and heir of the king. Donald's great-grandfather died when he was a baby, at age 80, and Donald's father became King Duncan I. King Duncan however, perished when Donald was still a boy, in 1040, killed by Thane Macbeth, yet another grandson of King Malcolm II, and took his place as king.

    Following his father's death, Donald went into hiding in Ireland for 17 years, for fear that he would be killed by Macbeth. His elder brother, Malcolm, went to England. It was during this time that Malcolm's grandfather, Crinan of Dunkeld, who was married to Malcolm II's daughter, was killed fighting Macbeth. When Malcolm grew to manhood, he overthrew Macbeth and became the new king. Donald was 24 years old at that time.

    Donald's activities during the reign of his elder brother Malcolm III (Máel Coluim mac Donnchada) are not recorded. It appears that he was not his brother's chosen heir, contrary to earlier custom, but that Malcolm had designated Edward, his eldest son by Margaret of Wessex, as the king to come. If this was Malcolm's intent, his death and that of Edward on campaign in Northumbria in November 1093 (see Battle of Alnwick (1093)) confounded his plans. These deaths were followed very soon afterwards by that of Queen Margaret.

    John of Fordun reports that Donald invaded the kingdom after Margaret's death "at the head of a numerous band", and laid siege to Edinburgh with Malcolm's sons by Margaret inside. Fordun has Edgar Ætheling, concerned for his nephews' well-being, take the sons of Malcolm and Margaret to England.[4] Andrew of Wyntoun's much simpler account has Donald become king and banish his nephews. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records only that Donald was chosen as king and expelled the English from the court.

    In May 1094, Donald's nephew Duncan (Donnchad mac Maíl Coluim), son of Malcolm and his first wife Ingibiorg Finnsdottir, invaded at the head of an army of Anglo-Normans and Northumbrians, aided by his half-brother Edmund and his father-in-law Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria. This invasion succeeded in placing Duncan on the throne as Duncan II, but an uprising defeated his allies and he was compelled to send away his foreign troops. Duncan was then killed on 12 November 1094 by Máel Petair, Mormaer of Mearns. The Annals of Ulster say that Duncan was killed on the orders of Donald (incorrectly called his brother) and Edmund.

    Donald resumed power, probably with Edmund as his designated heir. Donald was an elderly man by the standards of the day, approaching sixty years old, and without any known sons, so that an heir was clearly required. William of Malmesbury says that Edmund bargained "for half the kingdom", suggesting that Donald granted his nephew an appanage to rule.

    Edgar, eldest surviving son of Malcolm and Margaret, obtained the support of William Rufus, although other matters delayed Edgar's return on the coat-tails of an English army led by his uncle Edgar Ætheling. Donald's fate is not entirely clear. William of Malmesbury tells us that he was "slain by the craftiness of David [the later David I] ... and by the strength of William [Rufus]". The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle says of Donald that he was expelled, while the Annals of Tigernach have him blinded by his brother. John of Fordun, following the king-lists, writes that Donald was "blinded, and doomed to eternal imprisonment" by Edgar. The place of his imprisonment was said to be Rescobie, by Forfar, in Angus. The sources differ as to whether Donald was first buried at Dunfermline Abbey or Dunkeld Cathedral, but agree that his remains were later moved to Iona.

    Descendants
    Donald left one daughter but no sons. His daughter Bethoc married Uctred (or Hadrian) de Tyndale, Lord of Tyndale, the probable ancestor of the Barons de Tyndale and the Tyndale/Tindal family. Bethoc's daughter, Hextilda, married Richard Comyn, Justiciar of Lothian. The claims of John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch to the crown in the Great Cause came from Donald through Bethóc and Hextilda.[15] Ladhmann son of Domnall, "grandson of the King of Scots" who died in 1116, might have been a son of Donald. He may equally have been a son of Domnall, son of Máel Coluim who died in 1085, who may in turn have been a son of Malcolm III or of Máel Coluim mac Maíl Brigti, Mormaer of Moray.

    Bethoc's second husband was Radulf of Nithsdale.

    Fictional depictions
    The minor character of Donalbain in William Shakespeare's play Macbeth represents Donald III.2,3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 30 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10770.htm#i107694
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10289.htm#i102881
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_III_of_Scotland

Gilchrist Stewart 4th Earl of Angus1

M, #7622, b. before 1187, d. between 1207 and 1211

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Gilchrist Stewart 4th Earl of Angus was born before 1187 in Scotland.1,3
  • Death*: He died between 1207 and 1211 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 4th Earl of Angus [S., c. 1115] before 1198. In 1198 he was a great benefactor to the Arbroath Abbey.

    Gilla Críst of Angus, ruled until 1206 as Mormaer of Angus. He was a son of Gille Brigte of Angus and younger brother of Adam of Angus.

    Almost nothing is known of him, except that he married Marjorie of Huntingdon, the daughter of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, and that he was succeeded by his son Donnchad before 1206. His daughter Bethóc (Beatrix) was married to Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland and was mother to Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland.2,4
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4587
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4588
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4587
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4588
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gille_Cr%C3%ADst,_Earl_of_Angus.

Gillbride (?) 2nd Earl of Angus1

M, #7623, b. circa 1150, d. circa 1187

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Gillbride (?) 2nd Earl of Angus was born circa 1150 in Scotland.3,4
  • Death*: He died circa 1187.2
  • Biography*: He was also known as Gilibride, Earl of Angus. He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Angus [S., c. 1115]. He fought in the Battle of the Standard on 22 August 1138, when the Scots were totally defeated at Northallerton, Yorkshire. In 1174 he was one of the hostages for King William the Lion [Scotland]

    Gille Brigte of Angus is one of the earliest attested Mormaers of Angus. He was possibly a descendant of Dubacan of Angus.

    Gille Brigte is recorded as a witness to a charter dating to 1150. He probably fathered both Adam and Gille Críst. He was dead by 1189, when his son Adam was the Mormaer.2,5

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Oct 2014

Dufugan (?) 1st Earl of Angus1

M, #7624, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Name Variation: Dufugan (?) 1st Earl of Angus was also known as Gilchrist (?) 1st Earl of Angus.2
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1100 in Scotland.1,3
  • Biography*: Dufugan, 1st Earl of Angus was created 1st Earl of Angus [Scotland] circa 1115.

    He was probably a descendant of Dubucan, a Mormaer of Angus in the 10th century.

    Dubacan of Angus is usually regarded as one of the earliest attested Mormaers. He is mentioned as Dubucan filius Indrechtaig mormair Oengusa (i.e. "Dubucan son of Indrechtach, Mormaer of Angus") in the Chronicle of the Kings of Alba, and it is told that he died along with his lord, Amlaib, son of Caustantín II at the Battle of Brunanburh (c. 937).

    There is another Dubacan, called Dufagan comes in a spurious foundation charter for Scone Abbey. The latter has no province name, but he is often called Mormaer or Earl of Angus because he shares the same name as Dubacan son of Indrechtach.

    Dubacan is considered a probable ancestor of Gilla Brigte of Angus. It is possible that Dubacan was succeeded by a man called Cuncar, although there is no information about their exact relationship.4,3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p657.htm#i6564
  2. [S816] M.A., D.D., F.S.A James Taylor, The Great Historic Families of Scotland, The Angus Douglases.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubacan_of_Angus
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p658.htm#i6580

Thomas de Londoniis1

M, #7625

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Thomas de Londoniis was born.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p509.htm#i5085

Arnulph de Hesding1

M, #7626

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Arnulph de Hesding was born.1
  • Marriage*: He married Emmelina (?)1

Family: Emmelina (?)

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5102

Emmelina (?)1

F, #7627

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Marriage*: Emmelina (?) married Arnulph de Hesding.1
  • Birth*: Emmelina (?) was born.1
  • Married Name: Her married name was de Hesding.1
  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5102

James Macrory Lord of Bute1

M, #7628, b. circa 1180, d. 1210

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: James Macrory Lord of Bute was born circa 1180 in Bute, Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1210 in Scotland; killed by the men of Skye, along with his father and two brothers.
    He gained the title of Lord of Bute.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4657
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2514.htm#i25131
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4658

Angus Mac Somerled Lord of Bute & Arran1

M, #7629, b. circa 1150, d. 1210

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Angus was born circa 1150 in Islay, Scotland.2,3,1
  • Death*: Angus died in 1210 in Skye, Scotland.3,5
  • Biography*: He inherited Bute, Arran and Gamoran, but lost these to his brother Ranald. He gained the title of Lord of Arran. He gained the title of Lord of Bute.

    Aonghas mac Somhairle (English: Angus, son of Somerled), sometimes called Angus, Lord of Bute and Arran (c. 1150-1210) was a son of Somerled and Ragnhild, (daughter of Olaf I Godredsson, King of the Isles, and Ingebjorg, herself daughter of Haakon Paulsson, Earl of Orkney). Aonghas succeeded his father, inheriting lands in Garmoran, Skye, Rum, Eigg, Bute and Arran and became known as Lord of Bute and Arran. In 1192 in a battle between Aonghas and his brother Raghnall, he was victorious and many were wounded and fell. He lost his lands on Bute after Alan fitz Walter was granted the lands of Bute by William I of Scotland in 1200. Aonghas was killed in battle with his three sons on Skye in 1210. After the death of Aonghas and his heirs, his brother Raghnall's sons Domhnall and Ruaidhri took possession of his lands.

    Notes
    JSome sources (such as Scots Peerage volume 5) erroneously claim that a granddaughter of Angus married Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland.1,2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 28 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2514.htm#i25131
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.
  3. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  4. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aonghas_mac_Somhairle

Hugh of Kevelioc (?) 3rd Earl of Chester1

M, #7630, b. circa 1147, d. 30 June 1181

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Bertrada de Montfort b. c 1155, d. c 1227

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Bertrada de Montfort1

F, #7631, b. circa 1155, d. circa 1227

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Hugh of Kevelioc (?) 3rd Earl of Chester b. c 1147, d. 30 Jun 1181

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester1

M, #7632, b. 1099, d. 16 December 1153

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester was born in 1099 in Castle of Gernon, Normandy, France*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Maude Fitz Robert, daughter of Robert de Caen 1st Earl of Gloucester and Mabel (?), circa 1141.3
  • Death*: Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester died on 16 December 1153; Supposedly poisened by his wife and William Perverell, of Nottingham.2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 16 December 1153 in St. Werburg's, Chester, Cheshire, England.2
  • Biography*: Ranulf II (also known as Ranulf de Gernon) (1099–1153) was an Anglo-Norman potentate who inherited the honour of the palatine county of Chester upon the death of his father Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester. He was descended from the Counts of Bessin in Normandy.

    In 1136 David I of Scotland invaded England as far as Durham but was forced by Stephen of England to negotiate treaties that involved granting Ranulf's lands to Scotland. Ranulf allied himself to Matilda to further his cause. He took Lincoln Castle in 1141, which was retaken by Stephen in a siege in which Ranulf was forced to flee for his life. Ranulf enlisted the help of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester to retake the castle and succeeded when King Stephen surrendered to him at Lincoln. While Matilda ruled England, Stephen's queen Matilda of Boulogne managed to defeat Ranulf and his allies at Winchester, which eventually resulted in Stephen being able to resume the throne.

    Early life
    Ranulf was born in Normandy at the Château Guernon, around 1100. He was the son of Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester and Lucy of Bolingbroke, who were both significant landowners with considerable autonomy within the county palatine. His father had begun a new lineage of the earldom of Chester. Ranulf married Maud, daughter of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester and inherited the earldom in 1128. Three years later he founded an abbey in North Wales, colonised by monks from the Norman Congregation of Savigny.

    Loss of northern lands to Scotland
    In late January 1136, during the first months of the reign of Stephen of England, his northern neighbour David I of Scotland crossed the border into England. He took Carlisle, Wark, Alnwick, Norham and Newcastle upon Tyne and struck towards Durham. On 5 February 1136, Stephen reached Durham with a large force of mercenaries from Flanders and forced David to negotiate a treaty by which the Scots were granted the towns of Carlisle and Doncaster, for the return of Wark, Alnwick, Norham and Newcastle.

    Lost from England to Scotland along with Carlisle was much of Cumberland and the honour of Lancaster, lands that belonged to Earl Ranulf's father and had been surrendered by agreement to Henry I of England in return for the Earldom of Chester. Ranulf claimed that his father had at that time been disinherited. When he heard of the concessions made to the Scottish King, Ranulf left Stephen's court in a rage.

    In the second Treaty of Durham (1139), Stephen was even more generous to David, granting the Earldom of Northumbria (Carlisle, Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire north of the Ribble) to his son Prince Henry. Ranulf was prepared to revolt in order to win back his lordship of the north.

    Ranulf takes Lincoln
    Battle of Lincoln (1141)
    By this time Matilda, named as the future Queen by her father Henry I, had gathered enough strength to contest Stephen's usurpation, supported by her husband Geoffrey of Anjou and her half-brother Robert of Gloucester. Prince Henry was to attend the English court that Michaelmas and Ranulf planned to overwhelm him on his return to Scotland. Stephen’s queen Matilda of Boulogne heard about the plot and persuaded Stephen to escort Henry back to Scotland. Ranulf then used subterfuge to seize Lincoln Castle. He and his half-brother William de Roumare sent their wives to visit the constable’s wife there and then arrived (dressed in ordinary clothes and escorted by three knights), apparently to fetch the ladies. They then seized the weapons in the castle, admitted their own men and ejected the royal garrison.

    Stephen eventually made a pact with the Ranulf and his half-brother and left Lincolnshire, returning to London before Christmas 1140, after making William de Roumare Earl of Lincoln and awarding Ranulf with administrative and military powers over Lincolnshire and the town and castle of Derby. The citizens of Lincoln sent Stephen a message complaining about the treatment they were receiving from Ranulf and asking the King to capture the brothers. The King immediately marched on Lincoln. One of his key pretexts was that according to the settlement, Lincoln Castle was to revert to royal ownership and that the half-brothers had reneged on this. He arrived on 6 January 1141 and found the place scantily garrisoned: the citizens of Lincoln admitted him into the city and he immediately laid siege to the castle, captured seventeen knights and began to batter down the garrison with his siege engines.

    Ranulf managed to escape to his earldom, collect his Cheshire and Welsh retainers and appeal to his father-in-law Robert of Gloucester, whose daughter Maud was still besieged in Lincoln, possibly as a deliberate ploy to encourage her father's assistance. In return for Robert's aid, Ranulf agreed to promise fidelity to the Empress Matilda.

    To Robert and the other supporters of the Empress this was good news, as Ranulf was a major magnate. Robert swiftly raised an army and set out for Lincoln, joining forces with Ranulf on the way. Stephen held a council of war at which his advisors counselled that he leave a force and depart to safety, but Stephen disregarded the odds and decided to fight, but was obliged to surrender to Robert. Ranulf took advantage of disarray amongst the king’s followers and in the weeks after the fighting managed to take the Earl of Richmond’s northern castles and capture him when he tried to ambush Ranulf. Richmond was put in chains and tortured until he submitted to Ranulf and did him homage.

    Stephen had been effectively deposed and Matilda ruled in his place. In September 1141, Robert of Gloucester and Matilda besieged Winchester. The queen responded quickly and rushed to Winchester with her own army, commanded by the professional soldier William of Ypres. The queen’s forces surrounded the army of the empress, commanded by Robert, who was captured as a result of deciding to fight his way out of the situation. The magnates following the empress were forced to flee or be taken captive. Earl Ranulf managed to escape and fled back to Chester. Later that year Robert was exchanged for Stephen, who resumed the throne.

    Defection to Stephen
    In 1144 Stephen attacked Ranulf again by laying siege to Lincoln Castle. He made preparations for a long siege but abandoned the attempt when eighty of his men were killed whilst working on a siege tower that fell and knocked them into a trench, suffocating them all.

    In 1145 (or early 1146) Ranulf switched allegiance from the Empress Matilda to Stephen. Since 1141 King David had been allied to Matilda, so Ranulf could now take up his quarrel with David of Scotland regarding his northern lands. It is probable that Ranulf's brother-in-law Phillip, (the son of Earl Robert), acted as an intermediary as Phillip had defected to the king. Ranulf came to Stephen at Stamford, repented his previous crimes and was restored to favour. He was allowed to retain Lincoln Castle until he could recover his Norman lands. Ranulf demonstrated his good will by helping Stephen to capture Bedford from Miles de Beauchamp and bringing 300 knights to the siege of Wallingford.

    Stephen welcomed Ranulf’s support but some of the king's supporters, (especially William de Clerfeith, Gilbert de Gant, Alan, 1st Earl of Richmond, William Peverel the Younger, William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel and John, Count of Eu), did not. Many of the magnates were alarmed when it was discovered that Ranulf wanted the king to take part in a campaign against the Welsh. Ranulf's opponents counselled the king that the earl might be planning treachery, since he had offered no hostages or security and could easily be ambushed in Wales. Stephen contrived a quarrel with Ranulf at Northampton, provoked by an advisor who told the earl that the king would not assist him unless he restored all the property he had taken and rendered hostages. The earl refused these terms. He was accused of treason and was arrested and imprisoned in chains until his friends succeeded in coming to terms with the King on 28 August 1146. It was then agreed that the earl should be released, provided he surrendered all the royal lands and castles he had seized (Lincoln included), gave hostages and took a solemn oath not to resist the king in future.

    Ranulf, arrested in contravention of the oath which the king had sworn to him at Stamford, revolted as soon as he regained his liberty and "burst into a blind fury of rebellion, scarcely discriminating between friend or foe”. He came with his army to Lincoln to recover the city but failed to break into its north gate and his chief lieutenant was slain in the fighting. Ranulf also tried to recover the castle at Coventry, by building a counter castle. The King came with a relief force to Coventry and although wounded in the fighting, drove Ranulf off and seized his hostages, including his nephew Gilbert fitz Richard de Clare, Earl of Hertford, whom Stephen refused to release unless Gilbert surrendered his own castles. Gilbert, while agreeing to the condition, revolted as soon as he was at liberty. This action pushed the Clares into a conflict from which they had previously remained aloof.

    Agreement with King David
    In May 1149 the young Prince Henry met the king of Scotland and Ranulf at Carlisle, where Ranulf resolved his territorial disputes with Scotland and an agreement was reached to attack York. Stephen hurried north with a large force and his opponents dispersed before they could reach the city. The southern portion of the honour of Lancaster, (the land between the Ribble and the Mersey), was conceded to Ranulf, who in return resigned his claim on Carlisle. Hence the Angevin cause secured the loyalty of Ranulf.

    Prince Henry, whilst trying to escape south after the aborted attack on York, was forced to avoid the ambushes of Eustace, King Stephen’s son. Ranulf assisted Henry, creating a diversion by attacking Lincoln, thus drawing Stephen to Lincoln and allowing Henry to escape.

    Treaty with Robert, Earl of Leicester
    The Earl’s territory in Leicestershire and Warwickshire brought him face to face with Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, whose family (including his cousin Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick and his brother Waleran de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Worcester) controlled a large part of the south Midlands. The two earls concluded an elaborate treaty between 1149 and 1153. The Bishops of Chester and Leicester were both entrusted with pledges that were to be surrendered if either party infringed the agreement.

    Death
    In 1153 Henry granted Staffordshire to Ranulf. That year, whilst Ranulf was a guest at the house of William Peverel the Younger, his host attempted to kill him with poisoned wine. Three of his men who had drunk the wine died, while Ranulf suffered agonizing pain. A few months later Henry became king and exiled Peverel from England as punishment. Ranulf succumbed to the poison on 16 December 1153: his son Hugh inherited his lands as held in 1135 (when Stephen took the throne), while other honours bestowed upon Ranulf were revoked.2,4

Family: Maude Fitz Robert b. c 1141, d. 29 Jul 1189

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_de_Gernon,_4th_Earl_of_Chester.

Maude Fitz Robert1

F, #7633, b. circa 1141, d. 29 July 1189

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Ranulph de Gernon 2nd Earl of Chester b. 1099, d. 16 Dec 1153

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10472.htm#i104718
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069

Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester1

M, #7634, b. circa 1070, d. between 27 January 1128 and 1129

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester was born circa 1070 in Briquessart, Livry, Normandy, France*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Lucy (?) of Bolingbroke, daughter of Turold (?) and (?) Malet, between 1098 and 1101 in England.5,6
  • Death*: Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester died between 27 January 1128 and 1129 in Chester, Cheshire, England.2
  • Biography*: Ranulf le Meschin, 3rd Earl of Chester (1070?1129) was a late 11th- and early 12th-century Norman magnate based in northern and central England. Originating in Bessin in Normandy, Ranulf made his career in England thanks to his kinship with Hugh d'Avranches - the earl of Chester, the patronage of kings William II Rufus and Henry I Beauclerc, and his marriage to Lucy, heiress of the Bolingbroke-Spalding estates in Lincolnshire.

    Ranulf fought in Normandy on behalf of Henry I, and served the English king as a kind of semi-independent governor in the far north-west, in Cumberland and Westmorland, founding Wetheral Priory. After the death of his cousin Richard d'Avranches in the White Ship Disaster of November 1120, Ranulf became earl of the county of Chester on the Anglo-Welsh marches. He held this position for the remainder of his life, and passed the title on to his son.

    Family and origins
    Ranulf le Meschin's father and mother represented two different families of viscounts in Normandy, and both of them were strongly tied to Henry, son of William the Conqueror. His father was Ranulf de Briquessart, and likely for this reason the former Ranulf was styled le Meschin, "the younger". Ranulf's father was viscount of the Bessin, the area around Bayeux. Besides Odo, bishop of Bayeux, Ranulf the elder was the most powerful magnate in the Bessin region of Normandy. Ranulf le Meschin's great-grandmother may even have been from the ducal family of Normandy, as le Meschin's paternal great-grandfather viscount Anschitil is known to have married a daughter of Duke Richard III.

    Ranulf le Meschin's mother, Margaret, was the daughter of Richard Goz. Richard's father Thurstan Goz had become viscount of the Hiémois between 1017 and 1025, while Richard himself became viscount of the Avranchin in either 1055 or 1056. Her brother (Richard Goz's son) was Hugh d'Avranches "Lupus" ("the Wolf"), viscount of the Avranchin and Earl of Chester (from c. 1070). Ranulf was thus, in addition to being heir to the Bessin, the nephew of one of Norman England's most powerful and prestigious families.

    We know from an entry in the Durham Liber Vitae, c. 1098 x 1120, that Ranulf le Meschin had an older brother named Richard (who died in youth), and a younger brother named William. He had a sister called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).

    Early career
    Historian C. Warren Hollister thought that Ranulf's father Ranulf de Briquessart was one of the early close companions of Prince Henry, the future Henry I. Hollister called Ranulf the Elder "a friend from Henry's youthful days in western Normandy", and argued that the homeland of the two Ranulfs had been under Henry's overlordship since 1088, despite both ducal and royal authority lying with Henry's two brothers. Hollister further suggested that Ranulf le Meschin may have had a role in persuading Robert Curthose to free Henry from captivity in 1089.

    The date of Ranulf senior's death, and succession of Ranulf junior, is unclear, but the former's last and the latter's earliest appearance in extant historical records coincides, dating to 24 April 1089 in charter of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, to Bayeux Cathedral. Ranulf le Meschin appears as "Ranulf son of Ranulf the viscount".
    In the foundation charter of Chester Abbey granted by his uncle Hugh Lupus, earl of Chester, and purportedly issued in 1093, Ranulf le Meschin is listed as a witness. His attestation to this grant is written Signum Ranulfi nepotis comitis, "signature of Ranulf nephew of the earl". However, the editor of the Chester comital charters, Geoffrey Barraclough, thought this charter was forged in the period of Earl Ranulf II. Between 1098 and 1101 (probably in 1098) Ranulf became a major English landowner in his own right when he became the third husband of Lucy, heiress of the honour of Bolingbroke in Lincolnshire. This acquisition also brought him the lordship of Appleby in Westmorland, previously held by Lucy's second husband Ivo Taillebois.

    Marriage to a great heiress came only with royal patronage, which in turn meant that Ranulf had to be respected and trusted by the king. Ranulf was probably, like his father, among the earliest and most loyal of Henry's followers, and was noted as such by Orderic Vitalis. Ranulf was however not recorded often at the court of Henry I, and did not form part of the king's closest group of administrative advisers. He witnessed charters only occasionally, though this became more frequent after he became earl. In 1106 he is found serving as a one of several justiciars at York hearing a case about the lordship of Ripon. In 1116 he is recorded in a similar context.

    Ranulf was, however, one of the king's military companions. When, soon after Whitsun 1101 Henry heard news of a planned invasion of England by his brother Robert Curthose, he sought promises from his subjects to defended the kingdom. A letter to the men of Lincolnshire names Ranulf as one of four figures entrusted with collecting these oaths. Ranulf was one of the magnates who accompanied King Henry on his invasion of Duke Robert's Norman territory in 1106. Ranulf served under Henry as an officer of the royal household when the latter was on campaign; Ranulf was in fact one of his three commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai. The first line of Henry's force was led by Ranulf, the second (with the king) by Robert of Meulan, and third by William de Warrene, with another thousand knights from Brittany and Maine led by Helias, Count of Maine. Ranulf's line consisted of the men of Bayeux, Avranches and Coutances.

    Lord of Cumberland
    A charter issued in 1124 by David I, King of the Scots, to Robert I de Brus cited Ranulf's lordship of Carlisle and Cumberland as a model for Robert's new lordship in Annandale. This is significant because Robert is known from other sources to have acted with semi-regal authority in this region. A source from 1212 attests that the jurors of Cumberland remembered Ranulf as quondam dominus Cumberland ("sometime Lord of Cumberland"). Ranulf possessed the power and in some respects the dignity of a semi-independent earl in the region, though he lacked the formal status of being called such. A contemporary illustration of this authority comes from the records of Wetheral Priory, where Ranulf is found addressing his own sheriff, "Richer" (probably Richard de Boivill, baron of Kirklinton). Indeed, no royal activity occurred in Cumberland or Westmorland during Ranulf's time in charge there, testimony to the fullness of his powers in the region.

    Ivo Taillebois, when he married Ranulf's future wife Lucy, had acquired her Lincolnshire lands but sometime after 1086 he acquired estates in Kendal and elsewhere in Westmorland. Adjacent lands in Westmorland and Lancashire that had previously been controlled by Earl Tostig Godwinson were probably carved up between Roger the Poitevin and Ivo in the 1080s, a territorial division at least partially responsible for the later boundary between the two counties. Norman lordship in the heartland of Cumberland can be dated from chronicle sources to around 1092, the year King William Rufus seized the region from its previous ruler, Dolfin. There is inconclusive evidence that settlers from Ivo's Lincolnshire lands had come into Cumberland as a result.

    Between 1094 and 1098 Lucy was married to Roger fitz Gerold de Roumare, and it is probable that this marriage was the king's way of transferring authority in the region to Roger fitz Gerold. Only from 1106 however, well into the reign of Henry I, do we have certain evidence that this authority had come to Ranulf. The "traditional view", held by the historian William Kapelle, was that Ranulf's authority in the region did not come about until 1106 or after, as a reward for participation in the Battle of Tinchebrai. Another historian, Richard Sharpe, has recently attacked this view and argued that it probably came in or soon after 1098. Sharpe stressed that Lucy was the mechanism by which this authority changed hands, and pointed out that Ranulf had been married to Lucy years before Tinchebrai and can be found months before Tinchebrai taking evidence from county jurors at York (which may have been responsible for Cumbria at this point).

    Ranulf likewise distributed land to the church, founding a Benedictine monastic house at Wetheral This he established as a daughter-house of St Mary's Abbey, York, a house that in turn had been generously endowed by Ivo Taillebois. This had occurred by 1112, the year of the death of Abbot Stephen of St Mary's, named in the foundation deed. In later times at least, the priory of Wetheral was dedicated to St Mary and the Holy Trinity, as well as another saint named Constantine. Ranulf gave Wetheral, among other things, his two churches at Appleby, St Lawrences (Burgate) and St Michaels (Bongate).

    As an incoming regional magnate Ranulf would be expected to distribute land to his own followers, and indeed the record of the jurors of Cumberland dating to 1212 claimed that Ranulf created two baronies in the region. Ranulf's brother-in-law Robert de Trevers received the barony of Burgh-by-Sands, while the barony of Liddel went to Turgis Brandos. He appears to have attempted to give the large compact barony of Gilsland to his brother William, but failed to dislogdge the native lord, the eponymous "Gille" son of Boite; later the lordship of Allerdale (including Copeland), even larger than Gilsland stretching along the coast from the river Ellen to the river Esk, was given to William.[45] Kirklinton may have been given to Richard de Boivill, Ranulf's sheriff.

    Earl of Chester
    1120 was a fateful year for both Henry I and Ranulf. Richard, earl of Chester, like Henry's son and heir William Adeling, died in the White Ship Disaster near Barfleur on 25 November. Only four days before the disaster, Ranulf and his cousin Richard had witnessed a charter together at Cerisy.

    Henry probably could not wait long to replace Richard, as the Welsh were resurgent under the charismatic leadership of Gruffudd ap Cynan. According to the Historia Regum, Richard's death prompted the Welsh to raid Cheshire, looting, killing, and burning two castles. Perhaps because of his recognised military ability and social strength, because he was loyal and because he was the closest male relation to Earl Richard, Henry recognized Ranulf as Richard's successor to the county of Chester.

    In 1123, Henry sent Ranulf to Normandy with a large number of knights and with his bastard son, Robert, Earl of Gloucester, to strengthen the garrisons there. Ranulf commanded the king's garrison at Évreux and governed the county of Évreux during the 1123-1124 war with William Clito, Robert Curthose's son and heir. In March 1124 Ranulf assisted in the capture of Waleran, Count of Meulan. Scouts informed Ranulf that Waleran's forces were planning an expedition to Vatteville, and Ranulf planned an to intercept them, a plan carried out by Henry de Pommeroy, Odo Borleng and William de Pont-Authou, with 300 knights. A battle followed, perhaps at Rougemontier (or Bourgthéroulde), in which Waleran was captured.

    Although Ranulf bore the title "earl of Chester", the honour (i.e., group of estates) which formed the holdings of the earl of Chester were scattered throughout England, and during the rule of his predecessors included the cantref of Tegeingl in Perfeddwlad in north-western Wales. Around 1100, only a quarter of the value of the honour actually lay in Cheshire, which was one of England's poorest and least developed counties. The estates elsewhere were probably given to the earls in compensation for Cheshire's poverty, in order to strengthen its vulnerable position on the Anglo-Welsh border. The possibility of conquest and booty in Wales should have supplemented the lordship's wealth and attractiveness, but for much of Henry's reign the English king tried to keep the neighboring Welsh princes under his peace.

    Ranulf's accession may have involved him giving up many of his other lands, including much of his wife's Lincolnshire lands as well as his lands in Cumbria, though direct evidence for this beyond convenient timing is lacking. That Cumberland was given up at this point is likely, as King Henry visited Carlisle in December 1122, where, according to the Historia Regum, he ordered the strengthening of the castle.

    Hollister believed that Ranulf offered the Bolingbroke lands to Henry in exchange for Henry's bestowal of the earldom. The historian A. T. Thacker believed that Henry I forced Ranulf to give up most of the Bolingbroke lands through fear that Ranulf would become too powerful, dominating both Cheshire and the richer county of Lincoln. Sharpe, however, suggested that Ranulf may have had to sell a great deal of land in order to pay the king for the county of Chester, though it could not have covered the whole fee, as Ranulf's son Ranulf de Gernon, when he succeeded his father to Chester in 1129, owed the king £1000 "from his father's debt for the land of Earl Hugh". Hollister thought this debt was merely the normal feudal relief expected to be paid on a large honour, and suggested that Ranulf's partial non-payment, or Henry's forgiveness for non-payment, was a form of royal patronage.

    Ranulf died in January 1129, and was buried in Chester Abbey. He was survived by his wife and countess, Lucy, and succeeded by his son Ranulf de Gernon. A daughter, Alicia, married Richard de Clare, a lord in the Anglo-Welsh marches. One of his offspring, his fifth son, participated in the Siege of Lisbon, and for this aid was granted the Lordship of Azambuja by King Afonso I of Portugal.

    That his career had some claim on the popular imagination may be inferred from lines in William Langland's Piers Plowman (c. 1362–c. 1386) in which Sloth, the lazy priest, confesses: "I kan [know] not parfitly [perfectly] my Paternoster as the preest it singeth,/ But I kan rymes of Robyn Hood and Randolf Erl of Chestre."2,6

Family: Lucy (?) of Bolingbroke b. c 1079

  • Last Edited: 23 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p4895.htm#i48941
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p4895.htm#i48941
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_le_Meschin,_3rd_Earl_of_Chester.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_le_Meschin,_3rd_Earl_of_Chester.

Lucy (?) of Bolingbroke1,2

F, #7635, b. circa 1079

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Lucy (?) of Bolingbroke was born circa 1079 in Lincolnshire, England.3,4
  • Marriage*: She married Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester, son of Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin and Margaret d'Avranches, between 1098 and 1101 in England.5,6
  • Biography*: Lucy of Bolingbroke (died circa 1138) was an Anglo-Norman heiress in central England and, later in life, countess of Chester. Probably related to the old English earls of Mercia, she came to possess extensive lands in Lincolnshire which she passed on to her husbands and sons. She was a notable religious patron, founding or co-founding two small religious houses and endowing several with lands and churches.

    Ancestry
    A charter of Crowland Abbey, now thought to be spurious, described Thorold of Bucknall, perhaps the same as her probable father Thorold of Lincoln, as a brother of Godgifu (Godiva), wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia. The same charter contradicted itself on the matter, proceeding to style Godgifu's son (by Leofric), Ælfgar, as Thorold's cognatus (cousin). Another later source, from Coventry Abbey, made Lucy the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar Leofricsson, while two other unreliable sources, the Chronicle of Abbot Ingmund of Crowland and the Peterbrough Chronicle also make Lucy the daughter of Earl Ælfgar. Keats-Rohan's explanation for these accounts is that they were ill-informed and were confusing Lucy with her ancestor, William Malet's mother, who was in some manner related to the family of Godgifu.

    Although there is much confusion about Lucy's ancestry in earlier writings, recent historians tend to believe that she was the daughter of Thorold, sheriff of Lincoln, by a daughter of William Malet (died 1071). She inherited a huge group of estates centred on Spalding in Lincolnshire, probably inherited from both the Lincoln and the Malet family. This group of estates have come to be called the "Honour of Bolingbroke".

    Marriages
    The heiress Lucy was married to three different husbands, all of whom died in her lifetime. The first of these was to Ivo Taillebois, a marriage which took place "around 1083". Ivo took over her lands as husband, and seems in addition to have been granted estates and extensive authority in Westmorland and Cumberland. Ivo died in 1094.

    The second marriage was to one Roger de Roumare or Roger fitz Gerold, with whom she had one son, William de Roumare (future Earl of Lincoln), who inherited some of her land. The latter was the ancestor of the de Roumare family of Westmorland. Roger died in either 1097 or 1098.

    Sometime after this, though before 1101, she was married to Ranulf le Meschin, her last and longest marriage. A son Ranulf de Gernon, succeeded his father to the earldom of Chester (which Ranulf acquired in 1121) and a daughter, Alice, married Richard de Clare.

    Upon her death, most of the Lincolnshire lands she inherited passed to her older son William de Roumare, while the rest passed to Ranulf II of Chester (forty versus twenty knights' fees). The 1130 pipe roll informs us that Lucy had paid King Henry I 500 marks after her last husband's death for the right not to have to remarry. She died around 1138.

    Religious patronage
    Lucy, as widowed countess, founded the convent of Stixwould in 1135, becoming, in the words of one historian, "one of the few aristocratic women of the late eleventh and twelfth centuryes to achieve the role of independent lay founder".

    Her religious patronage however centered on Spalding Priory, a religious house for which her own family was the primary patron. This house (a monastic cell of Crowland) was founded, or re-founded, in 1085 by Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois. Later, she was responsible for many endowments, for instance in the 1120s she and her third husband Earl Ranulf granted the priory the churches of Minting, Belchford and Scamblesby. In 1135, Lucy, now widowed for the last time, granted the priory her own manor of Spalding for the permanent use of the monks. The records indicate that Lucy went to great effort to ensure that, after her own death, her sons would honour and uphold her gifts.4

Family: Ranulph le Meschin 1st Earl of Chester b. c 1070, d. bt 27 Jan 1128 - 1129

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p407.htm#i4069
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_de_Gernon,_4th_Earl_of_Chester.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158412
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_of_Bolingbroke
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116473
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranulf_le_Meschin,_3rd_Earl_of_Chester.

Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin1

M, #7636, b. circa 1050, d. between November 1120 and 1129

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin was born circa 1050 in Bayeux, Normandy, France*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret d'Avranches, daughter of Richard le Goz Vicomte d'Averanches and Emma de Contville, circa 1069 in Avaranches, Normandy, France.3,4
  • Death*: Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin died between November 1120 and 1129.2
  • Biography*: Ranulf de Briquessart (or Ranulf the Viscount) (died c. 1089 or soon after) was an 11th-century Norman magnate and viscount. Ranulf's family were connected to the House of Normandy by marriage, and, besides Odo, bishop of Bayeux, was the most powerful magnate in the Bessin region. He married Margaret, daughter of Richard Goz, viscount of the Avranchin, whose son and successor Hugh d'Avranches became Earl of Chester in England c. 1070.

    Ranulf is probably the "Ranulf the viscount" who witnessed a charter of William, Duke of Normandy, at Caen on 17 June 1066. Ranulf helped preside over a judgement in the curia of King William (as duke) in 1076 in which a disputed mill was awarded to the Abbey of Mont St. Michael. On 14 July 1080 he witnessed a charter to the Abbey of Lessay (in the diocese of Coutances), another in the same year addressed to Remigius de Fécamp bishop of Lincoln in favour of the Abbey of Préaux. and one more in the same period, 1079 x 1082, to the Abbey of St Stephen of Caen. His name is attached to a memorandum in 1085, and on 24 April 1089 he witnessed a confirmation of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy and Count of Maine to St Mary of Bayeaux, where he appears below his son in the witness list.

    He certainly died sometime after this. His son Ranulf le Meschin became ruler of Cumberland and later Earl of Chester. The Durham Liber Vitae, c. 1098 x 1120, shows that his eldest son was one Richard, who died in youth, and that he had another son named William. He also had a daughter called Agnes, who later married Robert de Grandmesnil (died 1136).2,4

Family: Margaret d'Avranches b. c 1054

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Margaret d'Avranches1

F, #7637, b. circa 1054

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin b. c 1050, d. bt Nov 1120 - 1129

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin1

M, #7638, b. 1017

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Aliz de Normandie

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Aliz de Normandie1

F, #7639

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Ranulf de Gernon Vicomte de Bessin b. 1017

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Ancitel (?) Vice-Count1

M, #7640, b. circa 992

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Godefroi I de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine1

M, #7641, b. circa 1060, d. 25 January 1139

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Godefroi I de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine was born circa 1060 in Louvain, France*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Ida de Namur Comtesse de Namur, daughter of Albert III de Namur Comte de Namur and Ida von Sachsen, circa 1105.3
  • Death*: Godefroi I de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine died on 25 January 1139 in Abbey of Affligem, Belgium*.2,4
  • Biography*: Godfrey I (German: Gottfried, Dutch:Godfried), born c. 1060, died 25 January 1139, called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey VI - n.b. Godfrey of Bouillon, d. 1100, was Godfrey V, but numbering is uncertain) from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.

    Godfrey was the son of Henry II (c. 1020-1078) and Adela of Orthen (or Betuwe), a daughter of Count Everard of Orthen. He succeeded his brother Henry III who died wounded in a tournament in 1095, and only had small daughters. His widow Gertrude married Theodoric II, Duke of (upper) Lorraine.

    He first came into conflict with Otbert, Bishop of Liège, over the county of Brunengeruz that both claimed. In 1099, Emperor Henry IV allotted the county to the bishop, who entrusted it to Albert III, Count of Namur. Godfrey arbitrated a dispute between Henry III of Luxembourg and Arnold I, Count of Loon, over the appointment of the abbot of Sint-Truiden.

    Godfrey was in favour with the emperor and defended his interests in Lorraine. In 1102, he stopped Robert II of Flanders "the Crusader", who was invading the Cambraisis. After the death of the emperor in 1106, his son and successor, Henry V, who had been in rebellion, decided to avenge himself on his father's partisans. Duke Henry of Lower Lorraine was imprisoned and his duchy confiscated and given to Godfrey. After Henry escaped from prison, he tried to retake his duchy and captured Aachen, but ultimately failed.

    In 1114, during a rift between the emperor and Pope Paschal II, Godfrey led a revolt in Germany. In 1118, the emperor and the duke were reconciled. In 1119, Baldwin VII of Flanders died heirless and Flanders was contested between several claimants, one of whom, William of Ypres, had married a niece of Godfrey's second wife. Godfrey supported William, but could not enforce his claim against that of Charles the Good. Also dead in that year was Otbert. Two separate men were elected to replace him and Godfrey again sided with the loser.

    By marrying his daughter Adeliza to Henry I of England, who was also the father-in-law of the emperor, he greatly increased his prestige. However, Henry V died in 1125 and Godfrey supported Conrad of Hohenstaufen, the duke of Franconia, against Lothair of Supplinburg. Lothair was elected. Lothair withdrew the duchy of Lower Lorraine and granted it to Waleran of Limburg (c. 1085 - 1139), the son of Henry, whom Henry V had deprived in 1106. Nonetheless, Godfrey maintained the margraviate of Antwerp and retained the ducal title (which would in 1183 become Duke of Brabant).

    After the assassination of Charles the Good in 1127, the Flemish succession was again in dispute. William Clito prevailed, but was soon fraught with revolts. Godfrey intervened on behalf of Theodoric of Alsace, who prevailed against Clito. Godfrey continued to war against Liège and Namur.

    Godfrey spent his last years in the abbey of Affligem. He died of old age on 25 January 1139 and was buried in the left aisle of the abbey church. He is sometimes said to have passed in 1140, but this is an error.

    Family and children
    He married Ida of Namur (Chiny) (nl) (1078 - 1117), daughter of Otto II of Namur, Count of Chiny (nl) (c. 1065 - a. 1131) and Adelaide of Namur, (House of Chiny (de)). They had several children:
    Adeliza of Louvain (b. 1103 – d. abbey of Affligem, 23 April 1151) married Henry I, King of England and later William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel (1109 – before 1151).
    Godfrey II of Louvain (b. 1107 – d. 13 June 1142), Duke of Lower Lotharingia (Lower Lorraine), Landgrave of Brabant, Count of Brussels and Louvain. He married Lutgardis of Sulzbach (d.a. 1163), daughter of Berenger I of Sulzbach.
    Clarissa (d. 1140).
    Henry (d. in the abbey of Affligem, 1141), monk.
    Ida (d. 1162) married to Arnold II, count of Cleves (d. 1147).
    Joscelin of Louvain, married Agnes De Percy and had issue.

    Later, he married Clementia of Burgundy (c. 1078 – c. 1133), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and widow of Robert II, Count of Flanders. They had no children.2,4

Family: Ida de Namur Comtesse de Namur b. c 1078, d. 23 Apr 1151

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10204.htm#i102038
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10251.htm#i102501
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10204.htm#i102038
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10251.htm#i102501
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II,_Count_of_Louvain.

Ida de Namur Comtesse de Namur1

F, #7642, b. circa 1078, d. 23 April 1151

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Godefroi I de Louvain Duc de Basse-Lorraine b. c 1060, d. 25 Jan 1139

  • Last Edited: 22 Nov 2014

Henry II (?) Count of Louvain1

M, #7643, b. 1021, d. after 1078

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Name Variation: Henry II (?) Count of Louvain was also known as Henri II (?) Comte de Louvain.1
  • Birth*: He was born in 1021 in Brabant, Belgium*.3
  • Marriage*: He married Adele de Bettau, daughter of Eberhard (?) Count of Bettau, circa 1055.1,4
  • Death*: Henry II (?) Count of Louvain died after 1078.2,4
  • Biography*: Henry II (German: Heinrich, Dutch:Hendrik, French: Henri) was Count of Louvain (Leuven) from 1054 through 1071. Henry II was the son of Lambert II, Count of Louvain and Oda of Verdun. His maternal uncles included Pope Stephen X and Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lorraine.

    Henry married Adela of Orthen, a daughter of Count Everard of Orthen. Henry and Adela had several sons and a daughter:
    Henry III, Count of Louvain (d. 1095). He married Gertrude of Flanders (1080–1117), daughter of Robert I of Flanders and Gertrude of Saxony. They probably bore duchess Adelaide wife of Simon I of Lorraine, and countess Gertrude wife to Lambert, count of Montaigu and Clermont.
    Godfrey I, Count of Louvain (1060 - 1139). He married Ida of Namur, who bore at least five children e.g. Godfrey II of Louvain, Duke of Lower Lorraine. later he married Clementia of Burgundy and bore Joceline of Louvain.
    Albero I of Louvain, Bishop of Liège
    Ida of Louvain married Baldwin II, Count of Hainaut.
    Elizabeth of Brabant, married Albert I, Duke of Brunswick and has issue.4

Family: Adele de Bettau b. c 1023, d. a 1086

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10251.htm#i102501
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3941
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10251.htm#i102501
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3941
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II,_Count_of_Louvain.

Adele de Bettau1

F, #7644, b. circa 1023, d. after 1086

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Henry II (?) Count of Louvain b. 1021, d. a 1078

  • Last Edited: 20 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10251.htm#i102501
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3942
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_II,_Count_of_Louvain.

Lambert II (?) Count of Louvain1

M, #7645, b. circa 995, d. 19 June 1054

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Marriage*: Lambert II (?) Count of Louvain married Oda de Basse-Lorraine, daughter of Gozelo I der Grobe Herzog von Niederlothringen and Urraca d'Ivrea.1
  • Birth*: Lambert II (?) Count of Louvain was born circa 995 in Lorraine, France.3
  • Death*: He died on 19 June 1054 in Doonik, Belgium*.2
  • Biography*: Lambert II (died Tournai, June 19, 1054) was count of Louvain between 1033 and 1054. Lambert was the son of Lambert I of Louvain (d. 1015).

    According the Vita Gudilae (recorded between 1048–1051) he followed his brother Henry I of Louvain. Lambert scorned both temporal and spiritual authorities and in 1054 even took up arms against Holy Roman Emperor Henry III. He was defeated and lost his life at Tournai.

    During his reign Brussels began its growth. Lambert arranged to transfer the remains of Saint Gudule to the St. Michael church. This church, thereafter known as Saints-Michel-et-Gudule, developed to become St. Michael and Gudula Cathedral. Lambert also constructed a fortress on the Coudenberg hill.

    Since Lambert II died in 1054, an imperial charter of September 1062 connecting a certain Lambert to the county Brussels, is probably referring to another person.

    Family
    Lambert of Louvain married Uda of Lorraine (also called Oda of Verdun), daughter of Gothelo I, Duke of Lorraine. Their children were:
    Henry II, Count of Louvain who married Adela of Orthen, a daughter of Count Everard of Orthen (or Betuwe).
    Adela of Louvain, married Otto I, Margrave of Meissen, Count of Weimar. Later married Dedi I, Margrave of the Saxon Ostmark.
    Reginar (Rainier) of Louvain. Killed in the battle of Hesbaye in 1077.4

Family: Oda de Basse-Lorraine b. c 990, d. 1062

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3941
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p394.htm#i3940
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3941
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p394.htm#i3940
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert_II,_Count_of_Louvain.

Oda de Basse-Lorraine1

F, #7646, b. circa 990, d. 1062

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Lambert II (?) Count of Louvain b. c 995, d. 19 Jun 1054

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3941
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p395.htm#i3944

Lambert I (?) Count of Louvain1

M, #7647, b. circa 950, d. 12 September 1015

17th century representation of Lambert I and Gerberga

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Marriage*: Lambert I (?) Count of Louvain married Gerberge de Basse-Lorraine, daughter of Charles (?) Duke of Lower Lorraine and Adelheid (?).1
  • Birth*: Lambert I (?) Count of Louvain was born circa 950 in France.2
  • Death*: He died on 12 September 1015.3
  • Biography*: Lambert I of Louvain nicknamed "The Bearded" (born in Louvain, Duchy of Lotharingia, East Francia c. 950, died in Florennes, County of Namur, Duchy of Lower Lorraine, Holy Roman Empire on September 12, 1015) was the first Count of Louvain in 1003. He was killed by Godfrey II, Duke of Lower Lorraine in battle for Godfrey's claim of Count of Verdun.

    He was the son of Regnier III, Count of Hainaut and Adela, brother of Reginar IV, Count of Mons, husband of Gerberga of Lower Lorraine, and father of:
    Henry I, Count of Louvain
    Lambert II, Count of Louvain, married Oda of Verdun.
    Reinier
    Matilda of Louvain (Maud.)4

Family: Gerberge de Basse-Lorraine b. 975, d. 1018

  • Last Edited: 19 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p394.htm#i3940
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p394.htm#i3940
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p391.htm#i3906
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p391.htm#i3906
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambert_I,_Count_of_Louvain.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p391.htm#i3902

Gerberge de Basse-Lorraine1

F, #7648, b. 975, d. 1018

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Lambert I (?) Count of Louvain b. c 950, d. 12 Sep 1015

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p394.htm#i3940
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p391.htm#i3907
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p391.htm#i3902

Roger le Bigod1

M, #7649, b. before 1071, d. between 8 September 1107 and 15 September 1107

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Alice de Tosny b. c 1050, d. a 1136

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116471
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116472
  3. [S701] Certificate, see memo marriage of 1862-1908, McNeil-Gillis 1899 July 4.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116471
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116472

Alice de Tosny1

F, #7650, b. circa 1050, d. after 1136

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Marriage*: Alice de Tosny married Roger le Bigod, son of Roger le Bigod.1,4
  • Married Name: Her married name was le Bigod.1,4
  • Birth*: Alice de Tosny was born circa 1050 in France*.5
  • Death*: She died after 1136.2

Family: Roger le Bigod b. b 1071, d. bt 8 Sep 1107 - 15 Sep 1107

  • Last Edited: 16 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116471
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2373.htm#i23721
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p46696.htm#i466953
  4. [S701] Certificate, see memo marriage of 1862-1908, McNeil-Gillis 1899 July 4.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p11648.htm#i116471
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p46696.htm#i466953