Cyan ap Iago1

M, #7531, b. circa 1025

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Ragnhild (?) of Dublin b. c 1030

  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10260.htm#i102593
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10260.htm#i102592

Ragnhild (?) of Dublin

F, #7532, b. circa 1030

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Cyan ap Iago b. c 1025

  • Last Edited: 2 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p40493.htm#i404930
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10260.htm#i102593

Olaf Sigtryggsson of Dublin1,2

M, #7533, b. circa 1020, d. 1034

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Olaf Sigtryggsson of Dublin was born circa 1020 in Dublin, Ireland*.1,2
  • Death*: He died in 1034 in on his way to Rome, England*.2
  • Biography*: Amlaíb mac Sitriuc ("Amhlaeibh, son of Sitric") or Olaf Sigtryggsson was the son of the Hiberno-Norse King of Dublin, Sigtrygg Silkbeard and Sláine, the daughter of Brian Boru. A member of the Uí Ímair dynasty, his ancestors also included Amlaíb Cuarán and Gormflaith, who were influential in medieval Ireland. He was ransomed by the Gaelic lord of Brega and later killed in England by Anglo-Saxons while on his way on pilgrimage to Rome in 1034. Some of his descendants later became the Kings of Gwynedd in Wales.

    Family
    Amlaíb was the son of the ruling King of Dublin, Sigtrygg Silkbeard (d. 1042), and his wife Sláine, daughter of the King of Munster and High King of Ireland, Brian Boru (d. 1014), and his first wife. His paternal grandfather was Amlaíb Cuarán (d. 981), the powerful King of York and of Dublin. Amlaíb Cuarán's wife was Gormflaith (d. 1030), a "beautiful, powerful and intriguing Irish woman" who later married Boru at the same time Sigtrygg married Sláine.

    Amlaíb had four half-brothers: Artalach (d. 999), Oleif (d. 1013), Godfrey (d. 1036), Glúniairn (d. 1031). Oleif was killed in immediate vengeance for the burning of the Norse city of Cork. Glúniairn was killed by the people of South Brega in 1031. Godfrey was killed in Wales, possibly by a first cousin. Amlaíb was outlived by his half-sister Cellach, who died in 1042 in the same month as her father.

    Politics
    In 1027, after the death of Máel Sechlainn in 1022 and the chaos which accompanied the subsequent bids for the High Kingship by the Irish princes, Sigtrygg Silkbeard was forced to make a new alliance with the men of Brega. Amlaíb joined Donnchad of Brega in a raid on Staholmock, County Meath. The army of Sigtrygg and Donnchad was defeated by the men of Meath under their king, Roen Ua Mael Sechlainn. Sigtrygg rallied to the fight again, and fought a battle at Lickblaw where Donnchad and Roen were slain.

    In 1029, Amlaíb was taken prisoner by the new lord of Brega, Mathghamhain Ua Riagain, who exacted a ransom of 1200 cows. Further conditions of the agreement necessitated payment of another 140 British horses, 60 ounces of gold and of silver, "the sword of Carlus", the Irish hostages of Leinster and Leath Cuinn, "four hostages to Ua Riagain as a security for peace, and the full value of the life of the third hostage."Added to the total, 80 cows "for word and supplication" were to be paid to the man who entreated for Amlaíb's release. The incident illustrates the importance of ransoming noble captives, as a means of political manipulation, increasing one's own revenues and exhausting the resources of one's foes. The demand of British horses also suggests that Dublin was one of the main ports for importing horses into 11th century Ireland, and that Amlaíb's family may have been personally involved in husbandry.

    According to the 17th century Annals of the Four Masters, Amlaíb mac Sitriuc "was slain by the Saxons" on his way on a pilgrimage to Rome in 1034. He was survived by one Ragnhild, who was the mother of Gruffudd ap Cynan, from whom the Kings of Gwynedd were descended.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Dec 2014

Iago ab Idwal ap Meurig King of Gwynedd1

M, #7534, b. circa 1000, d. 1039

Medieval Wales

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Iago ab Idwal ap Meurig King of Gwynedd was born circa 1000 in Wales*.1
  • Death*: He died in 1039.3
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of King of Gwynedd in 1023.

    On the death of Llywelyn ap Seisyll in 1023, the rule of Gwynedd returned to the ancient dynasty with the accession of Iago, who was a great-grandson of Idwal Foel.

    Very little is known about the reign of Iago. He was killed by his own men in 1039 and replaced by Llywelyn ap Seisyll's son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. Iago's grandson Gruffydd ap Cynan later won the throne of Gwynedd, and because his father, Cynan ap Iago, was little known in Wales, Gruffydd was styled "grandson of Iago" rather than the usual "son of Cynan".2,4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Idwal ap Meurig1

M, #7535

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Idwal ap Meurig was born.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10260.htm#i102591

William Comyn Earl of Buchan1

M, #7536, b. 1163, d. 1233

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Comyn Earl of Buchan was born in 1163 in Altyre, Morayshire, Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Sarah Fitz hugh, daughter of Robert Fitz Hugh, circa 1190.4
  • Marriage*: William Comyn Earl of Buchan married Margaret (?) Countess of Buchan, daughter of Fergus (?) 4th Earl of Buchan, between 1209 and 1212 in Scotland.1,3
  • Death*: William Comyn Earl of Buchan died in 1233 in Buchan, Scotland.3
  • Biography*: William Comyn was one of four sons (and three daughters) of Richard Comyn, Justiciar of Lothian and Hextilda of Tynedale. He was born in Scotland, in Altyre, Moray in 1163 and died in Buchan in 1233 where he is buried in Deer Abbey. He was Lord of Badenoch and was earl-consort of Buchan.

    William made his fortune in the service of king William I of Scotland fighting the Meic Uilleim in the north. William witnesses no less than 88 charters of the king. William was sheriff of Forfar (1195-1211), Justiciar of Scotia (1205-33) and warden of Moray (1211-2). Between 1199 and 1200, William was sent to England to discuss important matters on King William's behalf with the new king, John.

    William was appointed to the prestigious office of Justiciar of Scotia, the most senior royal office in the kingdom, in 1205. Between 1211 and 1212, William, as Warden of Moray (or Guardian of Moray) fought against the insurgency of Gofraid mac Domnaill (of the Meic Uilleim family), who William beheaded in Kincardine in 1213. Upon finally destroying the Meic Uilleim's in 1229, he was given the Lordship of Badenoch and the lands it controlled.

    From an unknown date, William held the title Lord of Kilbride.

    He helped oversee the construction of St Mungo's Cathedral in Glasgow and after his death, Marjory continued his work there.

    Earl of Buchan
    During his period as Warden of Moray, Comyn was so successful, it may have been the reason he received the hand of Marjory (aka. Margaret), Countess of Buchan, sometime between 1209-1212. Her father Fergus, Earl of Buchan, had no male heirs and so in marrying his daughter to William he ensured a suitable line for his titles before his death. Dying sometime around 1214 (perhaps earlier) William took over the management of the mormaerdom (earldom) of Bucham, by right of his wife.

    Family tree
    William (is believed to have) had six children through his first wife Sarah Fitzhugh and eight through Marjory, Countess of Buchan. The two branches would be associated with the Lordship of Badenoch through his first wife and the Earldom of Buchan through the second. For the historian Alan Young, William's life, and particularly his marriage to the Countess of Buchan, marks the beginning of the "Comyn century".

    NB. Children are ranked according to either accounts showing a specific rank in the order of Williams children's birth or according to the earliest available date the child was thought to have been born.
    father Richard Comyn (b.c.1115-1123 d.c.1179); mother Hextilda of Tynedale (aka. Hextilda FitzUchtred or Hextilda FitzWaldeve) (b.1112-1122 d.c. 1149-1189). Hextilda's first husband was Malcolm, 2nd Earl of Atholl, making their son Henry, 3rd Earl of Atholl, William Comyn's half-brother.

    first wife married 1193: Sarah Fitzhugh (aka. Sarah filia Roberti) (b.1155-1160 d.c.1204)
    1. Richard (b.c.1190-1194 d.c.1244-1249); married to unknown wife; father of John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (b.c.1220 d.c.1277)
    2. Jardine Comyn, Lord of Inverallochy (b. during or before 1190)
    3. Walter, Lord of Badenoch (b.1190 d.c.1258) married Isabella, Countess of Menteith
    4. Johanna (aka. Jean) (b.c.1198 d.c.1274); married c.1220: Uilleam I, Earl of Ross (aka. William de Ross) (b.c.1194-1214 d.1274)
    5. John Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Angus (d.1242); married (c.1242); Matilda, Countess of Angus (aka. Maud) (b.c.1222, d.1261)
    6. David Comyn, Lord of Kilbride (d.1247); married Isabel de Valoigne (d.1253)
    second wife married c.1209-1212: Marjory (aka. Margaret), Countess of Buchan (aka. Margaret Colhan of Buchan) (b.c.1184 d.c.1243-1244)
    1. Idonea (aka. Idoine) (b.c.1215-1221); married 1237: Gilbert de Haya of Erroll (aka. Gilbert de la Hay) (d.1262)
    2. Alexander, Earl of Buchan (b.c.1217 d.c.1289-1290); married: Elizabetha de Quincy (aka. Isabel) (b.1220 d.1282)
    3. William (b.c.1217)
    4. Margaret (b.c. 1218-1230); married Sir John de Keith, Marischal of Scotland (b.1212 d.1270)
    5. Fergus (b.c.1219-1228 d.); married 1249: unknown wife; father of Margaret Comyn (b.c.1270)
    6. Elizabeth (b.c. 1223 d.1267); married: Uilleam, Earl of Mar (d.1281)
    7. Agnes (b.c.1225); married 1262: Sir Philip de Meldrum, Justiciar of Scotia (aka. Philip de Fedarg or Philip de Melgarum.)3

Family 1: Sarah Fitz hugh b. bt 1155 - 1160, d. c 1204

Family 2: Margaret (?) Countess of Buchan b. c 1190, d. bt 8 Apr 1242 - 1244

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p523.htm#i5225
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4596
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch#Family_tree.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4592

Richard Comyn Lord of Tynedale1

M, #7538, b. between 1115 and 1123, d. circa 1179

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard Comyn Lord of Tynedale was born between 1115 and 1123 in Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Hextilda of Tynedale (?), daughter of Uchtred Fitz Waldeve and Bethoc (?) of Scotland, between 1152 and 1159 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: Richard Comyn Lord of Tynedale died circa 1179 in Scotland.4,2
  • Biography*: Richard Comyn (d. c 1179) was a Scottish noble, the nephew of William Comyn.

    Richard was probably born between 1115 and 1123. In 1144, William Comyn gave him Northallerton Castle, which he had built a few years earlier. Shortly after, he received the castle and honour of Richmond as part of his uncle's settlement to renounce to Durham bishopric. In 1145, Richard was married to Hextilda, the daughter of Uchtred, Lord of Tynedale, and his wife Bethoc ingen Domnaill Bain, the daughter of King Donald III of Scotland.

    In Scotland, he acquired the position of Justiciar of Lothian: he witnessed 6 charters for King Malcolm IV and 33 for King William I. He was captured with King William in 1174 and was a hostage for him in the Treaty of Falaise. He gave, with Hextida's consent, lands to the monks at Hexham, Kelso and Holyrood. He died between 1179 and 1182. Hextilda remarried to Máel Coluim, Earl of Atholl (also called Malcolm).

    Children
    Richard had four sons by Hextilda:
    John, dead between 1152 and 1159, and buried at Kelso Abbey.
    William, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan.
    Odinel (also called Odo), a priest, witness to Richard's charters to religious houses in 1162 and 1166.
    Simon, mentioned in the 1166 charter to the Augustinians in Holyrood.
    and three daughters:
    Idonea
    Ada
    Christien

    His daughters were witnesses to a donation made by Máel Coluim, Earl of Atholl and their mother Hextilda to the Church of St Cuthbert in Durham.2

Family: Hextilda of Tynedale (?) b. c 1125

  • Last Edited: 14 Nov 2014

Hextilda of Tynedale (?)1,2

F, #7539, b. circa 1125

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Married Name: Her married name was Comyn.1
  • Birth*: Hextilda of Tynedale (?) was born circa 1125 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: She married Richard Comyn Lord of Tynedale between 1152 and 1159 in Scotland.4
  • Biography*: As a result of her marriage, Hextilda was styled as Countess of Atholl circa 1150. Her married name became Comyn.3

Family: Richard Comyn Lord of Tynedale b. bt 1115 - 1123, d. c 1179

  • Last Edited: 20 Feb 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4596
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4599
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4596
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4599

Sir David Graham1

M, #7540, b. circa 1250, d. circa 1329

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir David Graham was born circa 1250 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died circa 1329.2

Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10809.htm#i108086
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4676

David II de Graham1

M, #7541, b. circa 1200, d. after 23 October 1237

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Annabelle (?) of Strathearn b. c 1200

  • Last Edited: 5 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4676
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4643
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10792.htm#i107915

Annabelle (?) of Strathearn1

F, #7542, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Married Name: Her married name was de Graham.1
  • Birth*: Annabelle (?) of Strathearn was born circa 1200 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: She married David II de Graham circa 1220.1

Family: David II de Graham b. c 1200, d. a 23 Oct 1237

  • Last Edited: 5 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4676
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4678
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10792.htm#i107915

Robert (?) 4th Earl of Strathearn1

M, #7543, b. circa 1180, d. before August 1244

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert (?) 4th Earl of Strathearn was born circa 1180 in Strathearn, Scotland.3
  • Death*: He died before August 1244 in Scotland.2
  • Biography: Robert of Strathearn, who ruled Strathearn 1223–1245, is the fourth known Mormaer of Strathearn, but of course this is simply a source problem and certainly does not mean that he actually was the fourth.

    Robert was the fourth son of Mormaer Gille Brigte. Not much is known of his reign, but we do know that in 1237 he travelled to York as part of the Scottish delegation who negotiated the Treaty of York. It seems he largely confined himself to his comital demesne, which would explain his conspicuous absence from the records, despite a relatively long reign.4
  • Last Edited: 22 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4678
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4679
  3. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert,_Earl_of_Strathearn.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39907.htm#i399070
  6. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander,_Earl_of_Menteith.

Gilbert (?) 3rd Earl of Strathearn1

M, #7544, b. before 1150, d. 1223

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gilbert (?) 3rd Earl of Strathearn was born before 1150 in Scotland.3
  • Marriage*: He married Maude d'Aubigny, daughter of William d'Aubigny 3rd Earl of Arundel and Mabel (?) of Chester, circa 1180.1
  • Death*: Gilbert (?) 3rd Earl of Strathearn died in 1223 in Scotland.2
  • Biography: Gille Brigte of Strathearn (Francized as Gilbert) is the third known Mormaer of Strathearn. He is one of the most famous of the Strathearn mormaers. He succeeded his father Ferchar in 1171. He is often known by the Francization of his name, Gilbert, or by various anglicizations, such as Gilbride, Gilbridge, etc. A more modern version of his name is Giolla or Gille Brighde, and means - roughly - devotee of St Brigit.

    Unikely his predecessors, we know for certain that Mormaer Gille Brigte was a regular attendee of the entourage of the Scottish king (in this case, King William I). Gille Brigte even served as the Justiciar of Scotia, an office usually held by the Mormaers of Fife, during the minority of Donnchad. Gille Brigte accompanied the King on his expeditions against Harald Maddadsson, the "rebellious" Earl of Orkney and Mormaer of Caithness. When William was captured at Alnwick in 1174, Gille Brigte too became a hostage, and shared William's fate as a prisoner at Falaise.

    In 1213, Gille Brigte acted as an arbitrator in the controversy over the succession to the Mormaerdom of Menteith, the neighboruing Mormaerdom. Gille Brigte was one of the Mormaers present at the coronation of King Alexander II in 1215, at Scone.

    Gille Brigte's reign brought Strathearn more fully into the fold of Scottish politics, although it does seem that he spent many of his last years in seclusion in Strathearn. He died in 1223.4

Family 1:

Family 2: Maude d'Aubigny b. c 1150, d. a 1210

  • Last Edited: 7 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4679
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4679
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert,_3rd_Earl_of_Strathearn.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A1el_Coluim_I,_Earl_of_Fife.

Fertheth (?) 2nd Earl of Strathearn1

M, #7546, d. before December 1170

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Fertheth (?) 2nd Earl of Strathearn was born in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Ethen (?) before 1150 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: Fertheth (?) 2nd Earl of Strathearn died before December 1170 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He was also known as Ferquhard. He gained the title of 2nd Earl of Strathearn.

    Mormaer Ferchar (fl. 1160) is the second earliest known Mormaer of Strathearn, but as with other Mormaerdoms, this is simply a source problem and in no way means the he actually was the second.

    Ferchar, like his predecessor Máel Ísu I, is largely absent from the witness lists of Scottish royal charters, indicating a lack of involvement with the Franco-Gaelic Kings of the Scots. However, after the defeat of the Scottish army at the Battle of the Standard, his father Máel Ísu was required to give a son as a hostage; it is possible, but not certain, that this son was Ferchar.

    It is clear that Ferchar was regarded as the most important native Scottish noble of his time, especially during the minority of Donnchad II, Mormaer of Fife. Ferchar is most famous perhaps for leading the so-called Revolt of the Earls, a protest against King Máel Coluim IV's expedition to Toulouse in the entourage of his overlord Henry II of England. King Máel Coluim seems to have believed the revolt to have some justification, as there is no evidence that any retribution was taken against either Ferchar or any of the other six Mormaers involved.

    Ferchar married a woman named Ethne. He had three sons, Gille Brigte, Máel Ísu and Christian. The first of these succeeded him to the Mormaerdom.

    Christian may have been a daughter, who married Lord David Oliphant as found in: The Peerage of Scotland A Genealogical and Historical Account of all the Peers of the Ancient Kingdom; Their Descendents, Collateral Branches, Births, Marriages, and Issue. Together with a Like Account of all the Attainted Peers; and a Complete Alphabetical List of all those Nobles of Scotland whose Titles are Extinct Collected from Parliament Rolls, Records, Family Documents and the Personal Information of Many Peers, also the Paternal Coats of Arms, Crests, Supporters and Mottoes Most Elegantly Engraved Edited by J. Almon, published 1767 and found at Google Books.2,4

Family: Ethen (?)

  • Last Edited: 11 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10775.htm#i107748
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10775.htm#i107748
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert,_3rd_Earl_of_Strathearn
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferchar,_Earl_of_Strathearn.

Ethen (?)1

F, #7547

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 25 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p465.htm#i4644
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10775.htm#i107748

Malise (?) 1st Earl of Strathearn1

M, #7548

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Malise (?) 1st Earl of Strathearn was born in Scotland.1
  • Biography: Máel Ísu I (also Maol Íosa, Máel Íosa, Mallus or Mallisse or Malise, "tonsured one of Jesus"), (fl. 1138), is the earliest known Mormaer of Strathearn. There is no indication that he was the first Strathearn mormaer, but poor source coverage from this period means that no previous ones are known.

    Máel Ísu participated in the invasion of the Kingdom of England by King David I in 1138. Like his successor Ferchar, Máel Ísu is largely absent from the witness lists of Scottish royal charters, indicating a lack of involvement in royal government. He was, however, a witness to a Charter of David I, confirming certain gifts and grants to Dunfermline Abbey, dated about 1128.

    Ailred of Rievaulx portrays Máel Ísu as the chief representative of the native Scottish faction at the royal court, opposed to the faction of Franks led by Robert de Brus. After the defeat of the Scottish army at the Battle of the Standard, Máel Ísu was required to give a son as a hostage.

    Máel Ísu's wife or wives are unknown to us. We do know he fathered Ferchar, his successor.2
  • Last Edited: 27 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10775.htm#i107748
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
  3. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Robert Fitz Hugh1

M, #7551, b. circa 1175

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert Fitz Hugh was born circa 1175 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4674

Walter Stewart 3rd High Steward of Scotland1

M, #7552, b. circa 1180, d. 1241

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Walter Stewart 3rd High Steward of Scotland was born circa 1180 in Dundonald Castle, Scotland.1,4
  • Marriage*: He married Beatrix Stewart of Angus, daughter of Gilchrist Stewart 4th Earl of Angus, circa 1205 in Scotland.5
  • Death*: Walter Stewart 3rd High Steward of Scotland died in 1241 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Walter Steward of Dundonald (c.?1198-1246) was 3rd hereditary High Steward of Scotland and Justiciar of Scotia.

    He was the eldest son of Alan fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland by his second wife Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar. He was the first to use Steward as a surname, and was designated "of Dundonald".

    He witnessed a charter by King Alexander II, under the designation of "Walterus filius Alani, Senescallus, Justiciar Scotiae"[4] and it may be that seal which Nisbet described pertaining to Walter Hereditary High Steward of Scotland. Around the seal it states "Sigill. Walteri filii Allani".

    Walter married Bethóc, daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus and his wife Marjorie, said to be a daughter of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon. They were parents of:

    Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland, sometime Regent of Scotland.
    Sir Robert, of Tarbolten and Crookston, and Lord of Darnley.
    John, killed at Damietta in 1249, Egypt during the Seventh Crusade.
    Walter Bailloch ("the Freckled"), who married Mary de Menteith and became Earl of Menteith.
    William,
    Beatrix, married Maol Domhnaich, Earl of Lennox.
    Christian,
    Eupheme,
    Margaret, married her cousin Niall, Earl of Carrick.
    Sybella, married Colin Fitzgerald, 1st Lord of Kintail.2,3
  • Last Edited: 13 Jun 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107849
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107850
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_3rd_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Walter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10209.htm#i102092
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p513.htm#i5129
  7. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4656
  8. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5109

Beatrix Stewart of Angus1

F, #7553

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Jun 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107849
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4587
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10209.htm#i102092
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p513.htm#i5129
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4656
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5109

Alan Fitz Walter 2nd Great Steward of Scotland1

M, #7555, b. 1140, d. 1204

Seal of Alan fitz Walter

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Marriage*: Alan Fitz Walter 2nd Great Steward of Scotland married Eva (?)1
  • Birth*: Alan Fitz Walter 2nd Great Steward of Scotland was born in 1140 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Alesta (?) of Mar, daughter of Morgund Mac Gylocher 2nd Mormaer or Earl of Mar, circa 1180 in Scotland.4
  • Death*: Alan Fitz Walter 2nd Great Steward of Scotland died in 1204 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Alan fitz Walter (1140–1204) was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader.

    Life
    Alan was the son and heir of Walter fitz Alan, by his spouse Eschina, who was possibly a member of a family from the south of Scotland. From the time of his succession to his death in 1204, Alan served as dapifer to William the Lion, King of Scots. It was during Alan's lifetime that his family acquired the Isle of Bute. He was possibly responsible for the erection of Rothesay Castle on the island.

    Alan accompanied Richard the Lionheart on the Third Crusade, from which he returned to Scotland in July 1191.

    A Royal Grant to Kinloss Abbey, signed at Melrose Abbey was made between 1179 and 1183. Amongst the witnesses are the Abbot of Melrose, the Abbot of Newbottle, Richard de Morville, Constable of Scotland, 'Alan, son of Walter the Steward, and William de Lauder.

    Alan became a patron of the Knights Templar and is responsible for expanding Templar influence in Scotland.

    He appears as a witness to other charters of William The Lion.

    Marriage and issue
    He married firstly, Eva, who is usually named as the daughter of Sweyn Thor'sson, although some historians dispute Eva's parentage. They had no known issue.

    By his second marriage to Alesta, daughter of Morggán, Earl of Mar and Ada, he had issue:
    Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland, married Bethóc, daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus and his wife Marjorie. He died in 1246.
    David
    Leonard
    Avelina, married Donnchadh, Earl of Carrick
    Some sources list Margaret Galloway as Walter's mother. Galloway is related to William the Conqueror and other royalty.5

Family 1: Eva (?)

Family 2: Alesta (?) of Mar b. c 1160

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107850
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4589
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Flaad
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_3rd_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Walter,_2nd_High_Steward_of_Scotland.

Eva (?)1

F, #7556

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107850

Walter Fitz Alan 1st Great Steward of Scotland1

M, #7557, b. circa 1120, d. 1177

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Walter Fitz Alan 1st Great Steward of Scotland was born circa 1120 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Eschyna de Molle, daughter of Thomas de Londoniis, circa 1150 in Scotland.1,3
  • Death*: Walter Fitz Alan 1st Great Steward of Scotland died in 1177 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He gained the title of 1st Great Steward of Scotland. In 1157 King Malocolm IV ratified the grants of Stewart of Scotland to his family. In 1164 he repelled an invasion of Renfrewshire.

    Walter fitz Alan (died June 1177) was the 1st hereditary High Steward of Scotland (ca. 1150-1177), and described as "a Norman by culture and by blood a Breton". He was the third son of a Breton knight, Alan fitz Flaad, feudal lord of Oswestry, by his spouse Aveline, daughter of Ernoulf de Hesdin.

    To Scotland

    When The Anarchy took hold in England and civil war between Empress Matilda and Stephen, Walter rallied to the support of the Empress. Her cause lost, Walter befriended David I who was an uncle of Matilda, and became, appropriately, David's dapifer or Steward. Accompanied by his brother Simon, Walter came to Scotland about 1136 and fought for Scotland at the Battle of the Standard at Northallerton in 1138 under the command of David I's son, Prince Henry.

    Career

    He was subsequently appointed by King David I, Steward of Scotland; in 1157 it was confirmed as a hereditary office. David also granted him for the service of five knights what eventually comprised Renfrewshire: the lands of Paisley, Pollok, Cathcart, and Ayrshire, reconfirmed in a charter in 1157 by Malcolm IV. In 1163 Walter founded, first at Renfrew but shortly afterwards at Paisley, a house of monks of the Cluniac order drawn from the priory of Much Wenlock, in his native county of Shropshire.[8] Walter acquired directly from the Crown the Berwickshire estates of Birkenside and Legerwood on the eastern or left bank of the Leader Water and presented to the monks the church of Legerwood, which they held from 1164 until the Reformation in 1560. The monastery steadily grew and by 1219 became Paisley Abbey.

    In 1164 he led a force which defeated Somerled, King of the Hebrides (Gaelic: rí Innse Gall) in the Battle of Renfrew.

    Death

    Walter, The Steward, died in 1177 and was interred in the monastery at Paisley, the burying-place of his family before their later accession to the throne.

    Marriage

    Walter fitz Alan was married to Eschyna de Londoniis, heiress of Uchtred de Molla (Molle) & Huntlaw (territorial designations, not then surnames) and widow of Robert Croc. Upon Walter's death his widow married Henry de Molle, whose new surname is probably taken from his wife's lands.2,3
  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4589
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p405.htm#i4047
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Fitzalan,_1st_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Carrick.

Eschyna de Molle1

F, #7558, b. circa 1115

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4589
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p509.htm#i5085
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Fitzalan,_1st_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Carrick.

Alan Fitz Flaald1

M, #7559, b. circa 1078

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Alan Fitz Flaald was born circa 1078 in Brittany, France*.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Aveline de Hesding, daughter of Arnulph de Hesding and Emmelina (?), circa 1120.1
  • Biography*: He held the office of Sheriff of Shropshire in 1101. Before 1122 he founded Sporle Priory, Norfolk as a cell of St. Saumur of Brittany.

    Alan fitz Flaad (c.1078 – after 1114) was a Breton knight, probably recruited as a mercenary by Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, in his conflicts with his brothers. After Henry became King of England, Alan became an assiduous courtier and obtained large estates in Norfolk, Sussex, Shropshire, and elsewhere in the Midlands, including the feudal barony and castle of Oswestry in Shropshire. His duties included supervision of the Welsh border. He is now noted as the progenitor of the FitzAlan family, the Earls of Arundel (1267–1580), and the House of Stuart, although his family connections were long a matter of conjecture and controversy.

    Family origins: a contested history

    The controversy over Stewart ancestry
    Alan's role was formerly obscure because of the political implications of examining the origins of the Stewart dynasty. Holinshed, deriving his information from the work of Hector Boece, asserted that Banquo, Thane of Lochaber, was the ancestor of the Stewarts. Distorting the role of Banquo, who is presented by Holinshed as Macbeth's chief accomplice in regicide, William Shakespeare presented him flatteringly in Macbeth as a martyred ancestor of James VI of Scotland and I of England. These legends, accepted as history, became part of the foundation narrative of the Stewarts and forced later writers to trace the Stewart ancestry through Fleance, Banquo's son. David Symson, the Historiographer Royal of Scotland, in a work dedicated to Queen Anne, followed the chroniclers in having Fleance marry a daughter of the Welsh ruler Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, and then introduced Walter as his son and Alan fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland as his grandson. However, this greatly distorted the chronology, forcing Sym to transpose Alan fitz Walter, actually born around 1140, to about 1073. This created a gap in the record, which was filled by multiplying the Alans and Walters in the Stewart line.

    David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes, in his Annals of Scotland, published in the 1770s, went some way to establish a convincing chronology for Walter fitz Alan, who, he asserted, belonged to the reign of David I of Scotland (1124-53) and his successor, Malcolm IV. Moreover, he was the first of the Stewarts: there was none in the reign of Malcolm III (1058–93), as Symson had been forced to maintain. He went on to demolish the legendary background to the Stewarts, which he described as "flattering and ignorant fictions". He showed that there was a need to distinguish the various Alans who were connected with the Stewart line, something he was unembarrassed to be unable to do:
    Some of my readers may demand, "Who then was Alan the father of Walter, Stewart of Scotland in the reign of Malcolm IV?" ... In the reign of David I, before the middle of the twelfth century, the family of the Stewarts was opulent and powerful. It may, therefore, have subsisted for many ages previous to that time; but when, and what was its commencement, we cannot determine.

    Andrew Stuart, a notable Scottish MP, accepted Dalrymple's critical work on the legendary ancestors, although he included among these a crusader Alan who was subsequently to emerge as genuine. He sought to establish a definite chronological framework, placing Walter fitz Alan's death in 1177.

    Not until the first decade of the 19th century did George Chalmers definitely prove that Walter fitz Alan, an acknowledged link in the Stewart ancestry, came from Shropshire and was actually the son of Alan fitz Flaad. This finally established Alan fitz Flaad's existence and importance, and confirmed the kinship between the Stewarts and the FitzAlan Earls of Arundel. Even then, the legendary background took almost a century to fade. In 1858, Robert William Eyton, the distinguished historian of Shropshire, while clarifying Alan fitz Flaad's connection with the county and details of his marriage, still tried to maintain a link with the legendary Banquo, and even surmised that Flaad was actually Fleance.

    After an anonymous work of 1874 drew attention to a strong connection between Alan fitz Flaad and Brittany, and confirmed Flaad's relationship to Alan the Seneschal, J. Horace Round definitively established and publicised Alan fitz Flaad's true Breton origins in 1901 in a collection of genealogical essays. Alan's father, Flaad (rendered in numerous way, including Flaald and Flathald), was a son (or possibly a brother) of Alain, dapifer to the Ancient Diocese of Dol, with its see at Dol-de-Bretagne, who had taken part in the First Crusade in 1097. "Alan Dapifer" is found as a witness in 1086 to a charter relating to Mezuoit, a cell near Dol of the Abbey of Saint-Florent de Saumur. The area of Dol is near Mont-Saint-Michel and has figured in the history of the Duchy of Brittany since at least the rule of Nominoe. Round's genealogy was confirmed in 1904 by Sir James Balfour Paul, then Lord Lyon King of Arms, who, in a definitive work, The Scots Peerage, stated that "the Stewarts or Stuarts are of Breton origin, descended from a family which held the office of Senescal or Steward of Dol." He then reinstated Alan fitz Flaad to his place in the ancestry of the Scottish royal family and gave a summary of what was known of his career.

    Career
    Arrival in England
    Flaad and his son Alan had come to the favourable notice of King Henry I of England who, soon after his accession, brought Flaad and Alan to England. Eyton, consistently following the theory of the Scottish origins of the Stewarts, thought this was because he was part of the entourage of the Queen, Matilda of Scotland, but Round pointed out that Henry had been besieged in Mont St Michel during his struggle with his brothers, an event which probably occurred in 1091. He is known to have recruited Breton troops at that time and, after his surrender, left the scene via the adjoining regions of Brittany, where Dol is situated. This is a likely explanation for the Bretons in the military retinue he brought to England after the death of William Rufus.

    Alan's career in England can be traced largely through his presence as a witness to charters granted by the king during his travels in the first decade or more of his reign. Some of his activities were traced by Eyton, and his researches overlap with William Farrer's calendar of Henry I's travels. All of the business in which he took part was ecclesiastical, involving grants, sometimes disputed, to churches and monasteries.

    Appearances at court
    Alan appeared in Henry I's company at least as early as September 1101, probably at a court held in Windsor Castle, when he witnessed important grants to Norwich Cathedral, confirming its foundation and various endowments. Next, he appeared with the king at Canterbury in 1103, where he witnessed the grant of a market to the nuns of Malling Abbey and land acquisitions by Rochester Cathedral, then in the process of rebuilding.

    Later that year or early in the next, Alan was with the king in the New Forest, where the business concerned Andover Priory, a daughter house of the great Benedictine Abbey of Saint-Florent de Saumur. He was probably selected deliberately for this meeting because of his family's close connections with Saumur Abbey: one of his uncles was a monk there. William Rufus had decreed that all chapels in the parish of Andover church should be handed over to the monks or destroyed. One problem at issue revolved around Foxcote chapel, which was evidently being defended from destruction or annexation by Edward de Foscote, a local landowner. Another seems to have been the administration of justice in the monastic estates. Wihenoc, a monk of St Florent, had initiated an action against the reeve of Andover to have these issues clarified and resolved. Alan fitz Flaad was called upon to witness a compromise, although Foxcote was among the properties confirmed to the priory by Pope Eugenius III in 1146.

    In the autumn of 1105 Alan was called to York to witness confirmation of Ralph Paynel's transfer of his refounded Holy Trinity Priory in York to Marmoutier Abbey, Tours and his many endowments of the priory itself. At some point he also witnessed the Roger de Nonant's gift of the church at Totnes and various tithes to the Abbey of SS Sergius and Bacchus at Angers, a gift which was earmarked as being for the souls of the royal family.

    In May 1110 Alan was at court at Windsor again to witness the king's settlement of a property dispute between Hervey le Breton, Bishop of Ely, and Ranulph Flambard, Bishop of Durham, resolved in favour of the former.

    Probably only later does he appear as a witness to royal command issued to Richard de Belmeis I, the Bishop of London and the king's viceroy in Shropshire, to see that justice was done in the case of a disputed prebend at Morville. The collegiate church there had been dissolved in order to endow Shrewsbury Abbey and it seems that the son of one of the prebendaries was resisting the loss of what he took fore his patrimony. Alan is listed among a group of Shropshire magnates, including Corbets and a Peverel, perhaps during Henry I's 1114 military expedition into Wales. Johnson and Cronne tentatively place the meeting at Holdgate Castle in Shropshire. Eyton dates the event earlier, around the time of a royal expedition to Shropshire in 1109. Whatever the date, it shows Alan as an important member of the Shropshire landowning class.

    Territorial magnate
    Alan's rapid ascent to wealth and power was a symptom of the troubled times. The abortive revolt of Robert de Belleme in 1102 had torn apart the Anglo-Norman system of governing the Welsh Marches With other Breton friends, Alan had been given forfeited lands in Norfolk and Shropshire, including some which had previously belonged to Robert de Belleme himself. Robert had proved a threat to Henry in both the Welsh Marches and in Normandy, so the king was determined to insert reliable supporters to counterbalance or replace his network of supporters. Alan received more land as he proved his worth. A large portfolio of lands in Shropshire and around Peppering, near Arundel in Sussex, was taken from the holdings of Rainald de Bailleul, ancestor of the House of Balliol, which was also later to provide a king of Scotland. These were lands granted to Rainald by William the Conqueror in recognition of his role as Sheriff of Shropshire. There is no evidence that Rainald or his successor, Hugh, were rebels, and it seems that their lands came to Alan as a consequence of his elevation to the shrievalty of the county. He also gained a stake in the very large estates of Ernulf de Hesdin by marriage to his daughter, Avelina.

    Religious grants and foundation.
    Alan was actively involved in a number of grants to religious institutions. One of the grants to Norwich Cathedral that he witnessed in 1101 concerned advowson of the church at Langham, Norfolk, which "had been Alan's", along with the tithes. It is possible this was a donation by himself. At some point unknown he gave the manor of Eaton, near Norwich, to Norwich Cathedral, a gift the king promised "to confirm when Alan comes to my court." It is unclear whether this implied the king doubted the existence or the authenticity of the monks' charter: it certainly implies that Alan's attendance at court was to be expected. He also made considerable grants of land to Castle Acre Priory, which lay on the boundary of his Norfolk honour of Mileham.

    However, his most important grants in Norfolk were to Sporle Priory, another Benedictine house subject to St Florent de Saumur, which he founded. He gave to the monks of St Florent the church at Sporle, its tithes, a man's landholding, a ploughland in Sporle and another in Mileham, firewood and building timber, and pasture for sheep. The Liber Albus of St Florent mentions that one of the monks present when Alan made the gift was Wihenoc, who initiated the action at Andover. Sporle was later endowed with property in Norfolk villages, including Great and Little Palgrave, where the priory had the church, Great Dunham, Hunstanton and Holme-next-the-Sea.

    Alan acquired Upton Magna, the manor in Shropshire on which Haughmond Abbey was later built, as part of the group of estates that had belonged to earlier sheriffs. A note at the beginning of the abbey's cartulary dates the foundation to 1100 but attributes it to Alan's son, William Fitz Alan, which is impossible, as he was not yet born. The existence of a religious community at Haughmond is not definitely attested before a grant of a fishery to what was still a priory by William, around 1135. While Eyton assumed that William was the founder, although at a later date than suggested by the introductory note on the cartulary, the Victoria County History account leaves open the possibility that a small semi-eremetic community existed earlier at Haughmond under Alan's protection, without leaving a written trace.

    Alan probably made small grants of land or property rights. He gave land at his manor of Stretton-on-Dunsmore in Warwickshire to Burton Abbey. He granted the tithes from his demesne at Burton on Trent to the monks of Léhon in Brittany, where there was a priory subject to the Abbey of Marmoutier: this is known from its confirmation some decades later by his grandson, Alan fitz Jordan. Alan fitz Jordan also confirmed his grandfather's grant to Marmoutier of property at Cuguen and confirmed or restored Alan fitz Flaad's gift of a mill at Burton to Sele Priory, a small Sussex monastery subordinate to St Florent de Saumur.

    Marriage and family
    Alan fitz Flaad married Avelina de Hesdin, daughter of Ernulf de Hesdin, a tenant-in-chief in ten counties at the time of Domesday, who was killed on crusade at Antioch. The Burkes' Royal Families of 1848 was one of the sources that asserted Alan's wife was the "dau(ghter) and heir of Warine, Sheriff of Shropshire, temp. William the Conqueror." The underlying reasoning seems to be that Alan held the lands formerly held by the sheriffs of the county and goes back at least as far as William Dugdale, but it was rejected by Eyton, not least because of lack of any evidence. He noted that:
    -William fitz Alan, in grants of his Sussex estates to Haughmond Abbey, referred to his mother as Adelina
    -in the account by Orderic Vitalis of the siege of Shrewsbury in 1138, the defender "Ernulf de Hesding" is referred to as the avunculus or maternal uncle of William fitz Alan.

    By deduction, this Ernulf, who shared his father's name and byname, was the brother of Avelina. Round traced the elder Ernulf's activities in Picardy and confirmed that he had a daughter, called Ava in this context, who was named as one of those consenting to a charter granting family holdings at Hesdin to the Priory of St George, a Benedictine house subject to Anchin Abbey[66] and located by Vieil-Hesdin, the original site of the town of Hesdin. The priory's record of the grant makes clear that Ernulf was riding in the entourage of William Rufus and returning to England at the time.

    The issue of Alan and Avelina was:
    William fitz Alan, eldest son (d. 1160), made High Sheriff of Shropshire by King Stephen of England in 1137. He married a niece of Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester. His son William (d. c1210) acquired by marriage the Lordship of Clun and he became designated "Lord of Clun and Oswestry". William is ancestor of the FitzAlan Earls of Arundel.
    Walter fitz Alan, second son, became first hereditary High Steward of Scotland, and ancestor of the Stewart Kings of Scotland.
    Jordan fitz Alan, of Burton, who inherited lands in Brittany, and restored to the Priory of St. Florent at Sele, West Sussex, the mill at Burton given it by his father.
    Simon fitz Alan, brother of Walter, who also went to Scotland and witnessed his brother's Foundation Charter of Paisley Abbey. Round suggests he may have been either a uterine brother or even a bastard brother.

    After Alan's death, Avelina married Robert fitz Walter, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, as shown in a grant, dated no earlier than 1126, in of their church at Chipping Norton to Gloucester Abbey.

    Death: a contested date
    Alan's death, when dated at all, is generally said to have been in or by 1114. This is based on reasoning set out be Eyton. He read in Dugdale's History of Warwickshire that Sybil of Wolston had confirmed a gift of land made by her mother, Adeliza, to Burton Abbey. He was convinced the land in question had belonged to Alan and that Adeliza was the same as Avelina, his wife. As Adeliza would not have been able to grant the land until it passed into her control on his death, and the Abbey was known to have had the land by 1114, it followed that Alan could not have lived beyond 1114. However, Round's researches established the reasoning was based on a false premise. Eyton had conflated three distinct but neighbouring Warwickshire manors, all belonging at one time to Rainald de Bailleul. One of the charters he collected, in which Sybil confirms a land grant to the Benedictine abbey at Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives, showed clearly that Sybil was not the daughter of Avelina and Alan fitz Flaad, but of one Hubert Baldram, a vassal of Rainald. Round thus concluded:
    Thus Adeliza, mother of Sybil, and wife of Hubert Baldran, was quite distinct from Avelina, wife of Alan Fitz Flaald, with whom Mr. Eyton rashly identified her. Alan may have lived, and probably did, beyond 1114...

    However the date stuck and appears in the 1973 Victoria County History account of Haughmond Abbey, it appears as a terminus ante quem for events in Alan's life. It is known that Avelina de Hesdin, as a widow, made a claim for her dower, relating to Eaton manor, against Everard of Calne, Bishop of Norwich. She obtained 100 shillings-worth of land in the manor for life, an award that Henry I confirmed in April/May 1121 at his court in Winchester. Alan's death must have pre-dated this award, but not necessarily by more than a few months.2,3
  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p405.htm#i4047
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5101
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_fitz_Flaad
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_Lord_of_Oswestry.

Aveline de Hesding1

F, #7560, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p405.htm#i4047
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p511.htm#i5102
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_FitzAlan,_Lord_of_Oswestry.