Walter de Burgh 1st Earl of Ulster1

M, #7471, b. circa 1230, d. 28 July 1271

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Walter de Burgh 1st Earl of Ulster was born circa 1230 in Ireland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Isabel Fitz John circa 1259.1
  • Death*: Walter de Burgh 1st Earl of Ulster died on 28 July 1271 in Galway, Ireland.2,3
  • Biography*: Burgh, Walter de, called Earl of Ulster d. 1271, was the second son of Richard de Burgh (d. 1243), perhaps by his wife, Egidia, daughter of Walter de Laci, second lord of Meath (Sweetman, Cal. of Irish Doc. i. Nos. 2700, 3012; Roberts, Fine Rolls, 128). He succeeded to the lordship of Connaught on the death of his brother Richard about 1248 (Sweetman, 2865, 3062; Annals of Loch Cé, 383 sub hoc anno). According to later genealogists he was the grandson of Henry II's Irish justiciar, William FitzAldelm, who, in his turn, is said to have been brother or cousin of Hubert de Burgh; but there does not seem to be any contemporary evidence to support either of these statements. It is, however, certain that his father, Richard de Burgh, was nephew to his great English namesake Hubert [qv.], who was himself justiciar of Ireland in 1232; and that his grandfather, William, is surnamed De Burgh in documents of 4 Henry III. and 7 Ed. I. (Pat. Rolls, ap. Book of Howth, 422-3; Sweetman, i. 954, ii. 1548). This William, who is reported to have died in 1205 (Loch Cé, i. 235; Bodley MS. Laud 613, p. 65) was Lord of Connaught; and his son, Richard de Burgh, was confirmed in the seignory of the same province by more than one charter of John and Henry III (Sweetman, 653, 1518, &c.)

    In November 1249 all the Irish lands of De Burgh were committed to the custody of Peter de Bermingham. Next year, however, the young heir was permitted to pay a fine of three hundred marks apparently for the right of immediate possession. This payment was to be made by half-yearly instalments, and De Burgh had to give security that he would not marry without the king's consent (Fine Rolls, 44, 78). He does not, however, seem to have come of age before 1253, in which year (6 April) part of his lands were still in the king's hands. A month earlier he had been excused his father's debt of 600l. due to the Dublin exchequer for a fine of 11— marks of gold (Sweetman, ii. Nos. 157, 175). From the year 1255 he was engaged in constant expeditions against the natives of Connaught. The chief king of Connaught at this time was Felim O'Conor, whose father, Cathal Crobdherg, had been established on the throne mainly by the aid of De Burgh's grandfather William, to the detriment of Cathal Carrach, who represented the elder branch of the descendants of Roderic O'Conor (Loch Cé, sub anno 1202). Both William and Richard de Burgh had had large possessions in Connaught. The latter in especial held the forfeited lands of Oethus, late king of Connaught, for a yearly payment of 500 marks, and the service of ten or twenty knights to the king of England (Sweetman, i. Nos. 954, 1518; Cal. Pat. Rolls, 16 b). These estates, and perhaps something of the regal claim involved in such a title, descended to De Burgh, and help to explain his constant interference in Irish matters.

    In 1255 De Burgh made a short-lived treaty with Aedh, the son of Felim O'Conor, and the favourable terms accorded to the Irish prince on this occasion may have been partly due to the effects of the embassy that Felim had sent earlier in the same year to Henry III (Loch Cé, 407-8). Next year he led a host of twenty thousand men to ravage Connaught, having for his allies on this occasion the sept of Muinter-Raighilligh (the O'Reillys of Breigne-O'Reilly); and afterwards plundered parts of the same province. A second peace followed (Athlone, 1257). This again may have been due to Henry III's influence, as we read that in this year the king of the Saxons gave Felim O'Conor a charter for the king's five cantreds, probably the five cantreds near Athlone, which were specially excluded from the early grants of Connaught to the De Burghs (cf. Sweetman, i. 2217-19). In 1260 De Burgh plundered Roscommon, and in 1262 took part in the great English expedition, when a site was marked out for the castle at the same place. Peace was again concluded, and Aedh O'Conor chivalrously trusted his person to the English, and as a mark of his confidence slept in the same bed with De Burgh. This year also saw an expedition against the Macarthys of Desmond. Similar friendly meetings or hostile expeditions characterised the years 1263, 1264, 1266, 1267, and 1270. In the last year a general war broke out between the English and the Irish of Connaught, owing to the dissensions of De Burgh and Aedh O'Conor, who had succeeded his father in 1265. On this occasion De Burgh, who was then styled Earl of Ulster, was induced to give his brother William as a hostage to O'Conor. On his retreat he slew Turlough O'Brian with his own hands, in return for which the king of Connaught put William de Burgh to death (ib.) Next year (1271) De Burgh died in his castle of Galway, after a week's illness (ib. 479; cf. Sweetman, ii. 929).

    Besides his vast possessions in Connaught, De Burgh seems to have had other estates in Ireland. His father had received a grant of Desmond manor in 11 Henry III (ap. Book of Howth), and from a document dated 3 Aug. 1253 we learn that the same Richard had held lands of Maurice Fitzgerald (Sweetman, ii. 282). It was probably from some dispute as to these estates that the quarrel between De Burgh and the latter noble arose in 1264, on which occasion the Earl of Ulster seized all Fitzgerald's castles in Connaught, and the major part of Erin was destroyed between them (Loch Cé, 449; cf. Sweetman, 776). Peace seems to have been restored by 10 June 1265, if we may trust the terms of a letter of Henry III, exhorting De Burgh not to lend assistance to the rebellion of Prince Edward (ib.)

    In the latter years of his life De Burgh appears to have been styled Earl of Ulster (Loch Cé, 449; Sweetman, ii. 929). According to the generally accepted account, he inherited this earldom in right of his wife, Maud, who is said to have been daughter and heiress of Hugh de Laci, earl of Ulster, who died in 1242 (Matt. Paris, iv. 232). There does not seem to be any evidence in support of this theory, which makes its first appearance in certain Fragmenta Historiæ Hibernicæ, preserved in a fifteenth-century manuscript (Bodley MS. Laud 526, ap. Gilbert, Chartularies of St. Mary's, Dublin, ii.), further back than which date no allusion to this Maud de Laci can be traced. Her name is not to be found in contemporary documents, which show that Walter de Burgh's wife—the mother of Richard, his son and successor in the earldom of Ulster—was Avelina or Amelina, third sister and coheiress of Richard FitzJohn (Cal. Geneal. ii. 540-1, 563; Sweetman, iv. 638, 950, &c.) It is possible that he may have put forward some vague claim in virtue of his maternal descent from Walter de Laci, who held Ulster for a few years by the gift of King Henry (ib. i. 1371-2). But it is more likely that this dignity, which had passed through so many hands in the course of fifty years, lapsed to the crown on the death of Hugh de Laci in 1242 or 1243; for there is abundance of evidence to prove that in the reign of Henry III Prince Edward, whom his father had created lord of Ireland in 1254, enfeoffed De Burgh with the county of Ulster, in exchange for the manor of Kilsilau. This event is expressly said to have occurred when William de Rochelle was justiciar, ie. between the years 1254 and 1256 (Sweetman, ii. 860, 1520; Cal. Geneal. 288). It is this enfeoffment probably that Lodge refers to 1264; and it is to this direct grant of Prince Edward that we must trace the foundation of the De Burgh Ulster earldom rather than to a marriage with a fictitious daughter of Hugh de Laci.

    De Burgh is said to have been buried in Athassel Abbey, the favourite foundation of his race (Lodge). He was succeeded by his son Richard, a minor. According to Lodge, his other children were Theobald (d. 1303), William, and Thomas (d. 1315), to whom some add Hubert and Gibbon. To these may be added Egidia, who married James Stuart of Scotland (Stevenson, Documents, ii. 102).4,3

Family: Isabel Fitz John b. c 1240

  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10693.htm#i106926
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p261.htm#i2608
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_de_Burgh,_1st_Earl_of_Ulster.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/e676.htm
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4655

Isabel Fitz John1

F, #7472, b. circa 1240

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Walter de Burgh 1st Earl of Ulster b. c 1230, d. 28 Jul 1271

  • Last Edited: 26 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10693.htm#i106926
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4655

Richard Mor de Burgh 1st Lord of Connaught1,2

M, #7473, b. circa 1194, d. circa 17 February 1243

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard Mor de Burgh 1st Lord of Connaught was born circa 1194 in Ireland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Hodiernna de Gernon before 1225 in Ireland.1,2
  • Death*: Richard Mor de Burgh 1st Lord of Connaught died circa 17 February 1243; He died while on his way to see the King of England at Bordeaux.3
  • Biography*: Richard de Burgh, Lord of Connaught also went by the nick-name of Richard 'the Great'. He gained the title of Lord of Connaught. He held the office of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland in 1227. In 1232 he built the castle of Galway. In 1236 he built the castle of Loughrea.

    Richard Mór de Burgh, 1st Lord of Connaught (c. 1194 – 1242), Justiciar of Ireland.

    Background
    De Burgh was the eldest son of William de Burgh and his wife who was a daughter of Domnall Mór Ua Briain, King of Thomond. De Burgh's principal estate was in the barony of Loughrea where he built a castle in 1236 and a town was founded. He also founded Galway town and Ballinasloe. The islands on Lough Mask and Lough Orben were also part of his demesne.

    From the death of his father in 1206 to 1214, Richard was a ward of the Crown until he received his inheritance. In 1215 he briefly served in the household of his uncle Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent. In 1223 and again in 1225 he was appointed Seneschal of Munster and keeper of Limerick castle.

    Connacht
    In 1224, Richard claimed the land of Connacht, which had been granted to his father but never, in fact, ruled by him. He asserted that the grant to Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, the native king, after his father's death had been on condition of faithful service, and that his son Aedh mac Cathal Crobdearg Ua Conchobair, who succeeded him that year, had forfeited it. He had the favour of the justiciar, Hubert de Burgh, and was awarded Connacht in May 1227. Having been given custody of the counties of Cork and Waterford and all the crown lands of Decies and Desmond, he was appointed Justiciar of Ireland from 1228 to 1232.

    When in 1232 Hubert de Burgh fell from grace, Richard was able to distance himself and avoid being campaigned against by the King. It was only in 1235 when he summoned the whole feudal host of the Norman barons to aid him that he expelled Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair, the native king, from Connacht. He and his lieutenants received great shares of land, while Felim was obliged to do homage and was allowed only to rent the five Royal cantreds of Athlone from the Crown. These five cantreds were the only lands de Burgh served to the Crown, keeping the remaining 25. De Burgh took the title of "Lord of Connacht".

    Wife and children
    Before 1225 he married Egidia de Lacy, daughter of Walter de Lacy, and Margaret de Braose. With this alliance he acquired the cantred of Eóghanacht Caisil with the castle of Ardmayle in Tipperary.

    Richard de Burgh had three sons and may have had four daughters:
    Sir Richard de Burgh, Lord of Connaught, Constable of Montgomery Castle who died without issue, 1248.
    Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster, Lord of Connaught, died 1271.
    Sir William Og de Burgh, died 1270.
    Alice
    Margery de Burgh (? – after March 1253), married Theobald Butler, 3rd Chief Butler of Ireland
    Matilda (?) who married as his second wife, Sir Gerald de Prendergast of Beauvoir, by whom she had a daughter, Maud.
    Unnamed daughter who married Hamon de Valoynes and had issue.

    Richard died on 17 February 1241/42 while on a royal expedition to Poitou.3,2

Family: Hodiernna de Gernon

  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p261.htm#i2608
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_M%C3%B3r_de_Burgh,_1st_Baron_of_Connaught.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p461.htm#i4605

Hodiernna de Gernon1

F, #7474

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Richard Mor de Burgh 1st Lord of Connaught b. c 1194, d. c 17 Feb 1243

  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p261.htm#i2608
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_M%C3%B3r_de_Burgh,_1st_Baron_of_Connaught.

William Fitz Adelm1,2

M, #7475, b. circa 1175, d. 1204

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Fitz Adelm was born circa 1175.1
  • Death*: He died in 1204.3
  • Biography*: In 1179 he obtained a grant of a large part of Connaught. He held the office of Governor of Wexford.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p461.htm#i4605
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_M%C3%B3r_de_Burgh,_1st_Baron_of_Connaught.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p461.htm#i4607

Neil (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick1

M, #7476, b. circa 1210, d. before 9 November 1292

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Neil (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick was born circa 1210 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret Stewart, daughter of Walter Stewart 3rd High Steward of Scotland and Beatrix Stewart of Angus, in 1234 in Scotland.4
  • Death*: Neil (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick died before 9 November 1292 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Carrick on 13 June 1250. He held the office of Regent of Scotland on 20 September 1255, and Guardian of King Alexander III.

    Níall of Carrick (also Neil) was the second man to bear the title Mormaer, or Earl, of Carrick. He was successor of mormaer Donnchadh of Carrick. He may have been Donnchadh's son, or else as suggested by one recent genealogical theory, his grandson. It has been argued that Niall's father was Nichol (Cailean or Colin), son of mormaer Donnchadh by the daughter of Niall Ruadh, briefly king of Tir Eoghain.

    Níall made a grant which assured that his nephew, Lachlan and successors would have all the powers in respect to the ceann ceneóil (head of kin). This grant was confirmed by King Alexander III. It ensured that the structure of Carrick's Gaelic society would remain pretty undisturbed in the event that no direct male heir was available to succeed him as earl.

    As things transpired, this is indeed what happened. Níall left no sons, and was succeeded by his daughter Marjory. The latter passed the mormaerdom on to her son Robert a Briuis, who became King Robert I of Scotland.2,5

Family: Margaret Stewart b. c 1206

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102473
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10462.htm#i104611
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Carrick.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10785.htm#i107849
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10462.htm#i104611
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niall,_Earl_of_Carrick.

Margaret Stewart1

F, #7477, b. circa 1206

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Neil (?) 2nd Earl of Carrick b. c 1210, d. b 9 Nov 1292

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Duncan (?) 1st Earl of Carrick1

M, #7478, b. circa 1175, d. 13 June 1250

Donnchadh ("Duncan")
Mormaer or Earl of Carrick

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duncan (?) 1st Earl of Carrick was born circa 1175 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Avelina Stewart, daughter of Walter Fitz Alan 1st Great Steward of Scotland and Eschyna de Molle, circa 1200 in Scotland.3
  • Death*: Duncan (?) 1st Earl of Carrick died on 13 June 1250 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He was created 1st Earl of Carrick [Scotland] circa 1186. Duncan, 1st Earl of Carrick 'carried off' Avelina Stewart in 1200. He fought in the Irish Wars, with King John of England.

    Donnchadh (or Donnchad) (Latinised Duncanus, later Anglicised as Duncan) was a Gall-Gaidhil prince and Scottish magnate in what is now south-western Scotland, whose career stretched from the last quarter of the 12th century until his death in 1250. His father, Gille-Brighde of Galloway, and his uncle, Uhtred of Galloway, were the two rival sons of Fergus, "King" or "Lord" of Galloway. As a result of Gille-Brighde's conflict with Uhtred and the Scottish monarch William the Lion, Donnchadh became a hostage of King Henry II of England. He probably remained in England for almost a decade before returning north on the death of his father. Although denied succession to all the lands of the Gall-Gaidhil, he was granted lordship over Carrick in the north-west.

    Allied to John de Courcy, Donnchadh fought battles in Ireland and acquired land there that he subsequently lost. A patron of religious houses, particularly Melrose Abbey and North Berwick priory nunnery, he attempted to establish a monastery in his own territory, at Crossraguel. He married the daughter of Alan fitz Walter, a leading member of the family later known as the House of Stewart—future monarchs of Scotland and England. Donnchadh was the first mormaer ("earl") of Carrick, a region he ruled for more than six decades, making him one of the longest serving magnates in medieval Scotland. His descendants include the Bruce and Stewart Kings of Scotland, and probably the Campbell Dukes of Argyll.2,3

Family: Avelina Stewart b. c 1175

  • Last Edited: 5 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10462.htm#i104611
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p417.htm#i4169
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Carrick.

Gilbert (?) of Galloway1

M, #7479, b. circa 1125, d. 1 January 1185

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gilbert (?) of Galloway was born circa 1125 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died on 1 January 1185 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Gille Brigte or Gilla Brigte mac Fergusa of Galloway (†1185), also known as Gillebrigte, Gille Brighde, Gilbridge, Gilbride, etc., and most famously known in French sources as Gilbert, was Lord of Galloway of Scotland (from 1161 with Uchtred; 1174 alone, to 1185). Gilla Brigte was one of two sons of the great Fergus, the builder of the "Kingdom" of Galloway.

    Background, marriage and family
    In the struggle that arose after the death of Fergus between Gille Brigte and Uchtred, Gille Brigte emerged the stronger. The partitioning of Galloway left Gille Brigte with the western part, the part less exposed to the armies of the Scottish and English Kings.

    We do not know for certain to whom Gille Brigte was married. Richard Oram suggests the strong likelihood that his main wife was a daughter of Donnchad II, Mormaer or Earl of Fife and the most important native lord in Scotland. The introduction of the name Donnchad (or Duncan) into the family naming pattern is some evidence of this, as is the later marriage of Gille Brigte's great-granddaughter Marjorie to the Fife petty-lord Adam de Kilconquhar.

    Gille Brigte had two known children:
    Donnchad
    Máel Coluim

    Events of 1174 & Approach to England
    From 1161 until 1174, Gille Brigte and Uchtred shared the lordship, with Gille Brigte in the west, and Uchtred in the east. In 1174, King William le Lion of Scotland invaded England in an attempt to regain Northumberland. He brought with him the two meic Fergusa, Gille Brigte and Uchtred. During the invasion, William was caught off-guard, and captured while besieging the castle at Alnwick. Benedict of Peterborough reported that:
    “     When they [the brothers] heard that their lord the king of Scotland was taken, they immediately returned with their Galwegians to their own lands, and at once expelled from Galloway all the bailiffs and guards whom the king of Scotland had set over them; and all the English and French whom they could seize they slew; and all the defences and castles which the king of Scotland had established in their land they besieged, captured and destroyed, and slew all whom they took within them (A.O. Anderson, p. 256)     ”

    Despite the implications that both brothers were involved, it is clear that only Gilla Brigte was, and that Uchtred opposed him. For Benedict goes on to tell us that, in relation to the same year, Gille Brigte's son Máel Coluim was besieging Uchtred on an island in Galloway. Máel Coluim mac Gille Brigte captured Uchtred. Uchtred was blinded, castrated and had his tongue cut out.

    What Gille Brigte did at this time might have changed British history for ever. Gille Brigte sent a messenger, and asked King Henry II for direct lordship (i.e. without the Scottish king as a middle man). Henry sent a delegation to investigate. This delegation consisted of Roger de Hoveden and Robert de Vaux. Thanks to the former, we have a record of the embassy. It is reported by Benedict of Peterborough that Gille Brigte offered the King of England a one-off payment of 2000 marks, and a yearly tribute of 500 cows and 500 swine, if the King would "remove them [the Galwegians] from the servitude of the king of Scotland" (Anderson, p. 258).

    However, when the delegation discovered the fate of Uchtred, Henry's cousin, they rejected the request. Gille Brigte's fratricide effectively prevented any deal. Gille Brigte's bad fortune was compounded later in the year, when Henry and William signed the Treaty of Falaise. Gille Brigte was forced to come to terms with the two kings. In 1176, Gille Brigte travelled into England, was fined 1000 marks by Henry, and handed over his son Donnchad into Henry's custody as a hostage to ensure good behaviour.

    The Lordship of Gille Brigte
    Gille Brigte's reign is characterized by a large degree of hostility towards the Scottish kings. Unlike his brother Uchtred, he was no friend to incoming Normans. He maintained a Gaelic following. Such a policy made him popular in the province, but alienated him from his nominal Franco-Gaelic overlords, King Máel Coluim IV and then King William. William cultivated the loyalty of Uchtred's son Lochlann (Roland), using him as a card in the game for control over the Galwegian lordship. In the 1180s, tension between Gille Brigte and William was high, with Gilla Brigte being known to have made frequent raids into the Scottish controlled territory of eastern Galloway. When Gille Brigte died in 1185, he was at war with William.

    Gille Brigte's timely death, with Donnchad still in Henry II's custody, eased the way for William to install Lochlann as Gille Brigte's successor.3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 11 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p417.htm#i4169
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4584
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gille_Brigte_of_Galloway

Fergus (?) Lord of Galloway1

M, #7480, b. circa 1100, d. 1161

Fergus of Galloway
Lord of Galloway

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Fergus (?) Lord of Galloway was born circa 1100 in Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Unknown (?) daughter of Henry I, daughter of Henry I "Beauclerc" (?) King of England, circa 1100.3
  • Death*: Fergus (?) Lord of Galloway died in 1161 in Holyrood Abbey, Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Fergus, Lord of Galloway married Joan (?), daughter of Henry I 'Beauclerc', King of England.

    Fergus of Galloway (Latin: rex Galwitensium, King of the Gallovidians), was a 12th-century king, a Lord of Galloway, who became well established by the 1140s by having a powerful dynasty over southwestern Scotland (roughly modern Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire). Fergus was a patron of the Church of Scotland and had neutral relations with the King of Scotland until the death of King David I, when relations with the Kings of Scots began to sour.

    Fergus became a central figure in the Arthurian romance, Fergus of Galloway: Knight of King Arthur, which was composed in Scotland.

    Origins of Fergus
    Fergus of Galloway first appears in the historical sources in 1136. His origins and his parentage, however, are something of a mystery. Fergus’ origins have been the subject of much discussion and even more fanciful fictional elaboration by historical writers.

    Fergus seems to have been of Norse-Galwegian heritage, and may have been descended from earlier princes. Fergus' father, Somairle, was a poor Roman warrior who benefited greatly by marriage to a noblewoman, from whom Fergus inherited power. Perhaps then, Fergus' father was a self-made warrior who married into the House of Man; perhaps Fergus inherited and further consolidated his position, building the kingdom out of the ruins left by the death of Magnus Barelegs.

    Fergus may also have descended from a great pedigree of Gall-Gaidhel kings, who might have been known as Clann Dubgaill, claiming descent from a certain Dubgall. Adding believability to this view is the fact that the chief branch of descendants of Somairle mac Gilla Brigte took the name MacDougall, while the cognate name MacDouall was popular in Galloway. However, since the Argyll name comes only from after Fergus' time, this theory cannot be accepted.

    A similar theory traces Fergus from a certain man called "Gilli," a Gall-Gaidhel "Jarl" of the Western Isles. The reasoning in this case is that the Roman de Fergus, an early 13th-century French language Arthurian romance, names its eponymous hero's father as Soumilloit (Somairle). The argument is that the latter was descended from the Jarl Gilli, and therefore that both Somairles had Jarl Gilli as a common ancestor. Likewise, yet another theory identifies Fergus' father with the obscure Sumarlidi Hauldr, a character in the Orkneyinga Saga.

    Writers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries had advanced the idea that Fergus was the childhood companion of David I at the Anglo-Norman court of King Henry I of England. This idea was given credence by his marriage to the daughter of King Henry I, his good relationship with David, and his friendliness towards Anglo-Norman culture.
    In reality such a relationship is pure fiction. Fergus was almost certainly a native Galwegian. The Roman de Fergus may not be entitled to general reliability in matters of historical correctness, but Soumilloit is unlikely to have been totally made up. Moreover, Somairle (anglicized either as Somerled or Sorley) is a thoroughly Gall-Gaidhel name, and makes perfect sense in the context. In light of the absence of other evidence, we have to accept that Fergus' father probably bore the name Somairle. Other than that, we simply cannot say anything about Fergus' origins for sure.

    Marriage and the building of the Lordship
    Fergus is known to have had in his lifetime two wives, the names of both being unknown. By these wives, though, three children are known:
    Gille Brigte
    Uchtred
    Affraic, wife to Óláfr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles.

    Western Galloway and 1st Marriage
    Fergus' likely power base was the area of Galloway between the rivers Dee and Cree. It has been suggested by Oram that he advanced his power in the west through marriage to an unknown heiress. The primary basis of this reasoning is that upon Fergus' death, Gille Brigte got the western part. The fact that he got the west has led Oram to believe that he got the west because of his mother.

    England and Second Marriage
    Fergus may have married an illegitimate daughter of King Henry I of England. Her name, however, is unknown. One of the candidates is Sibylla, the widow of King Alexander I of Scotland, but there is little evidence for this. Another candidate could be Elizabeth; but likewise, there is little evidence. If he did marry a daughter of Henry I, the marriage can be interpreted as part of the forward policy of Henry I in the northwest of his dominions and the Irish Sea zone in general, which was engineered in the second decade of the 12th century. It may have been during this time that Fergus began calling himself rex Galwitensium ("King of Galloway"). However, while his possible father-in-law lived, Fergus, like King David I of Scotland), seems to have remained a faithful "vassal" to Henry.

    Marriage of Affraic to Man
    As part of Fergus' pretensions in the Irish Sea world, Fergus made himself the father-in-law of the Manx king by marrying off his daughter Affraic to Óláfr Guðrøðarson, King of the Isles (1114–1153). Óláfr was in many ways a client of the English and Scottish Kings, and so within this new Anglo-Gaelic Irish Sea system, Fergus could establish a dominant position. This position lasted until the death of Óláfr in 1153 at the hands of his brother's sons, who had been brought up in Dublin, and were waiting in the wings.

    Elevation of Whithorn
    In the early 12th century, Fergus of Galloway resurrected the Bishopric of Whithorn, an ancient Galwegian See first established by the expansionary Northumbrians under the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of York. The warrior-Bishop Wimund is said to have attacked Bishop Gille Aldan of Whithorn. The elevation of Whithorn may have incurred the wrath of the Bishop of the Isles, giving indication that the Galwegian church existed before Fergus’ reign.

    Fergus and David I
    On Henry's death in late 1135, Fergus’ relationship with the Kings of the English could not be maintained. David I of Scotland, ruler of much of Scotland and northern England, assumed a position of dominance. The balance of power swung firmly in David’s favor. It was no longer possible to maintain a position of real independence from the Scottish king. It is at this point Fergus comes into contemporary sources. In summer 1136, David I was in attendance at the consecration of Bishop John’s cathedral in Glasgow. Here was a big gathering of Scottish and Norman nobles. Fergus is recorded as having been in attendance too (with his son Uchtred), leading a list of southwestern Gaelic nobility.
    The gathering also assisted David’s ambitions against the new and weak King of the English, Stephen. Galwegian contingents are recorded in several sources as being present during the subsequent campaign and at the defeat of David by the levies of Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire at the Battle of the Standard in 1138. We cannot know for sure if Fergus was there, but the peace treaty made between David and Stephen in 1139 stipulated that one of Fergus’ sons (certainly Uchtred) be given as a hostage.

    Fergus and Malcolm IV
    In 1153, King David died. The personal relationship of superiority which David had enjoyed over Fergus was not meant to apply to the former’s successors. David was succeeded by the boy-king, Máel Coluim IV. Yet Fergus initially seems to have had a good relationship with the new King. In 1156, Fergus captured and handed over Máel Coluim’s rival Domnall mac Maíl Choluim, the MacHeth pretender to the Kingdom of the Scots.

    Still, by the end of the decade Fergus and King Máel Coluim were not friends. In 1157, the boy-king’s position in southern Scotland was weakened, when he was forced by King Henry II to hand over Cumbria and Northumbria. It was probably this blow to Máel Coluim’s power that gave Fergus his chance to reassert his independence. The Chronicle of Holyrood reports that Máel Coluim led three campaigns against Fergus in 1160. The context was that Máel Coluim (who was an English feudatory in his capacity as Earl of Huntingdon) had been in France with his lord Henry II, and had just returned to Scotland. Many of the native Scottish magnates besieged Máel Coluim at Perth upon his return. However, Fergus was not one of them, and any connection between the so-called Revolt of the Earls and Fergus has no evidence to substantiate it. On the other hand, it is highly suggestive that this revolt occurred in exactly same year as the invasion of Galloway.

    Fergus and the Meic Fergusa
    Fergus’ later years were mired by the squabbling of his two sons. Perhaps too Fergus’ longevity was testing his sons’ patience. Walter Daniel reported that, in relation to the mid-1150s, Fergus was:
    “… incensed against his sons, and the sons raging against the father and each other … The King of Scotland could not subdue, nor the bishop pacify their mutual hatreds, rancour and tyranny. Sons were against father, father against sons, brother against brother, daily polluting the unhappy little land with bloodshed.” (Walter Daniel, ‘‘Life of Ailred’’, 45-6; quoted in Oram, pp. 78–9)

    Whether because of Gille Brigte and Uchtred, or because of Máel Coluim’s campaigns, Fergus was forced into retirement, becoming a monk at Holyrood Abbey in 1160. He died the following year.

    Roman de Fergus
    Around the beginning of the 13th century, someone in Scotland composed in French an Arthurian romance dedicated to the Galwegian King. This is the so-called Roman de Fergus. The Roman de Fergus, as it happens, is the earliest piece of non-Celtic vernacular literature to emerge from Scotland. According to tradition, the author was a man called Guillaume le Clerc (William the Clerk).

    Certain scholars have hypothesized that it was written for the inauguration of Fergus' descendant, Alan mac Lochlainn (or perhaps more appropriately in this context, Alan fils de Roland). More recently, D.D.R. Owen, a St Andrews scholar of medieval French, has proposed that the author was William Malveisin. William was at one point a royal clerk, to King William I, before becoming Bishop of Glasgow and St Andrews. The Roman gratifies Fergus' descendants by making him a Perceval-like knight of King Arthur.

    However, the medieval Dutch Ferguut and its source, Guillaume le Clerc's Fergus were recently studied by Dutch scholars Willem Kuiper and Roel Zemel. Both deny a Scottish author and origin. In their opinion Guillaume was someone from the continent (Liege?) who once travelled to Edinburgh and made literary use of Lothian and Scotland (land of the scutum or escu (shield)).

    The Roman circulated all over the Frankish world of northwestern Europe for centuries to come. It is a tribute to Fergus' legendary status as a monarch and as the founding father of Galloway.1,2

Family 2: Elizabeth (?) b. c 1101

Family 3:

  • Last Edited: 22 Sep 2017

Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon1

F, #7481, b. 1171, d. 6 January 1233

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon was born in 1171 in Chester, Cheshire, England.1,2
  • Marriage*: She married David (?) Earl of Huntingdon, son of Henry (?) Earl of Huntingdon and Ada de Warenne, circa 1206 in England.1
  • Death*: Matilda (?) of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon died on 6 January 1233 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Matilda of Chester, Countess of Huntingdon (1171 – 6 January 1233) was an Anglo-Norman noblewoman, sometimes known as Maud and sometimes known with the surname de Kevelioc. She was a daughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 5th Earl of Chester, and the wife of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon. Through her daughter, Isobel, she was an ancestress of Robert the Bruce.

    Family
    Lady Maude was born in 1171, the eldest child of Hugh de Kevelioc (aka Hugh de Meschines), 5th Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort, a cousin of King Henry II of England. Her paternal grandparents were Ranulf de Gernon and Maud (Matilda) of Gloucester, the granddaughter of King Henry I of England, and her maternal grandparents were Simon III de Montfort, Count of Évreux and Mahaut.

    Lady Matilda's five siblings were:
    Ranulf de Blondeville, 6th Earl of Chester
    Richard[4] (died young)
    Mabel of Chester, Countess of Arundel
    Agnes (Alice) of Chester, Countess of Derby
    Hawise of Chester, Countess of Lincoln.
    She also had a sister, Amice (or Amicia) of Chester, who may have been illegitimate.

    Matilda's father died in 1181 when she was ten years of age. He had served in King Henry's Irish campaigns after his estates had been restored to him in 1177. They had been confiscated by the King as a result of his taking part in the baronial Revolt of 1173–1174. His son Ranulf succeeded him as Earl of Chester, and Matilda became a co-heiress of her brother.

    Dervorguilla of Galloway, a granddaughter of Matilda of Chester.

    Marriage and issue
    On 26 August 1190, she married David of Scotland, 8th Earl of Huntingdon, a Scottish prince, son of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, and a younger brother of Malcolm IV of Scotland and William I of Scotland. He was almost thirty years Matilda's senior. The marriage was recorded by Benedict of Peterborough.

    David and Matilda had seven children:
    Margaret of Huntingdon (c. 1194 – after 1 June 1233), married Alan, Lord of Galloway, by whom she had two daughters, including Dervorguilla of Galloway.
    Robert of Huntingdon (died young)
    Ada of Huntingdon, married Sir Henry de Hastings, by whom she had one son, Henry de Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings.
    Matilda (Maud) of Huntingdon (-aft.1219, unmarried)
    Isobel of Huntingdon (1199–1251), married Robert Bruce, 4th Lord of Annandale, by whom she had two sons, including Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale.
    John of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon (1207 – 6 June 1237), married Elen ferch Llywelyn. He succeeded his uncle Ranulf as Earl of Chester in 1232, but died childless.
    Henry of Huntingdon (died young)
    Her husband David had four illegitimate children by various mistresses.

    On her brother Ranulf's death in October 1232 Matilda inherited a share in his estates with her other 3 sisters, and his Earldom of Chester suo jure. Less than a month later with the consent of the King, Matilda gave an inter vivos gift of the Earldom to her son John the Scot who became Earl of Chester by right of his mother. He was formally invested by King Henry III as Earl of Chester on 21 November 1232. He became Earl of Chester in his own right on the death of his mother six weeks later.
    Matilda died on 6 January 1233 at the age of about sixty-two. Her husband had died in 1219. In 1290, upon the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway, which caused the extinction of the legitimate line of William I, the descendants of David and Matilda became the prime competitors for the crown of Scotland. Through their daughter, Isobel, they were the direct ancestors of the renowned Scottish King, Robert the Bruce.2

Family: David (?) Earl of Huntingdon b. bt 1143 - 1152, d. 17 Jun 1219

  • Last Edited: 31 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102478
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Chester,_Countess_of_Huntingdon.

Maud (?) of Northumberland, Queen of the Scots1

F, #7482, b. circa 1074, d. between 23 April 1130 and 22 April 1131

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Maud (?) of Northumberland, Queen of the Scots was born circa 1074 in Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: She married David I (?) King of the Scots, son of Malcolm III 'Canmore' (?) King of the Scots and Saint Margaret (?) Queen of the Scots, circa 1114.1
  • Death*: Maud (?) of Northumberland, Queen of the Scots died between 23 April 1130 and 22 April 1131 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Maud was the daughter of the Waltheof, the Anglo-Saxon Earl of Huntingdon and Northampton, and his Norman wife Judith of Lens. Her father was the last of the major Anglo-Saxon earls to remain powerful after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, and the son of Siward, Earl of Northumbria. Her mother was the niece of William the Conqueror.

    She was married to Simon de Senlis (or St Liz) in about 1090. He received the honour of Huntingdon (whose lands stretched across much of eastern England) probably in right of his wife from William Rufus before the end of the year 1090.

    She had three known children by him:
    Matilda of St Liz (Maud) (d. 1140); she married Robert FitzRichard of Tonbridge.
    Simon of St Liz (d. 1153)
    Saint Waltheof of Melrose (c. 1100 – 1159/60)

    Her first husband died some time after 1111 and Maud next married David, the brother-in-law of Henry 1st of England, in 1113. Through the marriage, David gained control over his wife's vast estates in England, in addition to his own lands in Cumbria and Strathclyde.3

Family: David I (?) King of the Scots b. bt 1080 - 1085, d. 24 May 1153

  • Last Edited: 1 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10293.htm#i102926
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10287.htm#i102868
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_of_Northumbria,_Countess_of_Huntingdon.

Sybilla (?) of Northumbria1

F, #7484, b. circa 1010

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Duncan I (?) King of the Scots b. c 1001, d. 14 Aug 1040

  • Last Edited: 24 May 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10216.htm#i102153
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10288.htm#i102880
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10770.htm#i107694

Duncan (?) Mormaer of Atholl1

M, #7485, b. circa 950

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duncan (?) Mormaer of Atholl was born circa 950 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He was Lay Abbot of Dunkeld. He was also known as Duncan O'Neill. He gained the title of Mormaer of Atholl. He fought in the Battle of Luncarty circa 990, where he commanded the left wing, and where the Danes were so crushingly defeated that their raids on that part of what subsequently became Perthshire, ceased.1
  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10767.htm#i107669

Duncan (?)1

M, #7486, b. circa 925, d. circa 965

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duncan (?) was born circa 925 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died circa 965 in Duncrub, Scotland; killed in action fighting for Colin, representative of a rival royal line of Aodh, when the latter was defeated by Duff, eldest son of Malcolm I, King of the Scots.1
  • Biography*: Duncan (?) died circa 965 at Duncrub, Scotland, killed in action fighting for Colin, representative of a rival royal line of Aodh, when the latter was defeated by Duff, eldest son of Malcolm I, King of the Scots.

    He was Lay Abbot of Dunkeld, to the north of Perth in what subsequently became the Scottish county of Perthshire. He fought in the Battle of Duncrub circa 965.2
  • Last Edited: 15 Nov 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10767.htm#i107669
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p32200.htm#i321999

Gilbert de Clare 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester1,2

M, #7487, b. 1180, d. 25 October 1230

Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford
5th (or 1st) Earl of Gloucester

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gilbert de Clare 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester was born in 1180 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Lady Isabella Marshal, daughter of William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil, circa 1218 in England.1,2
  • Death*: Gilbert de Clare 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester died on 25 October 1230 in Brittany, France.2
  • Biography*: Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester (1180 – 25 October 1230) was the son of Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hertford, from whom he inherited the Clare estates. He also inherited from his mother, Amice Fitz William, the estates of Gloucester and the honour of St. Hilary, and from Rohese, an ancestor, the moiety of the Giffard estates. In June 1202, he was entrusted with the lands of Harfleur and Montrevillers.

    In 1215 Gilbert and his father were two of the barons made Magna Carta sureties and championed Louis "le Dauphin" of France in the First Barons' War, fighting at Lincoln under the baronial banner. He was taken prisoner in 1217 by William Marshal, whose daughter Isabel he later married on 9 October, her 17th birthday.

    In 1223 he accompanied his brother-in-law, Earl Marshal, in an expedition into Wales. In 1225 he was present at the confirmation of the Magna Carta by Henry III. In 1228 he led an army against the Welsh, capturing Morgan Gam, who was released the next year. He then joined in an expedition to Brittany, but died on his way back to Penrose in that duchy. His body was conveyed home by way of Plymouth and Cranborne to Tewkesbury. His widow Isabel later married Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall & King of the Romans. His own arms were: Or, three chevronels gules.

    Issue
    Gilbert de Clare had six children by his wife Isabel, née Marshal:
    Agnes de Clare (b. 1218)
    Amice de Clare (1220–1287), who married Baldwin de Redvers, 6th Earl of Devon
    Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester (1222–1262)
    Isabel de Clare (1226–1264), who married Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale
    William de Clare (1228–1258)
    Gilbert de Clare (b. 1229.)2

Family: Lady Isabella Marshal b. 9 Oct 1200, d. Jan 1240

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102475
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_de_Clare,_5th_Earl_of_Gloucester.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_de_Clare,_3rd_Earl_of_Hertford.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p408.htm#i4074
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_de_Clare,_5th_Earl_of_Gloucester.

Lady Isabella Marshal1

F, #7488, b. 9 October 1200, d. January 1240

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Gilbert de Clare 4th Earl of Hertford, 5th Earl of Gloucester b. 1180, d. 25 Oct 1230

  • Last Edited: 24 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102475
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10125.htm#i101241
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Marshal,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke.
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10248.htm#i102475
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10125.htm#i101241
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_de_Clare,_5th_Earl_of_Gloucester.

William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke1,2

M, #7489, b. 1146 or 1147, d. 14 May 1219

Tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke was also known as The Marshal.2,4
  • Birth*: He was born in 1146 or 1147 in England.1
  • Marriage*: He married Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil, daughter of Richard Fitzgilbert de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke and Aoife MacMorrough, in August 1189 in London, Greater London, England.5,4
  • Death*: William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke died on 14 May 1219 in Caversham, Berkshire, England.2,3
  • Biography*: William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147 – 14 May 1219), also called William the Marshal (Norman French: Williame le Mareschal; Anglo-Norman: Guillaume le Marechal), was an English (or Anglo-Norman) soldier and statesman. Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived." He served four kings – Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III – and rose from obscurity to become a regent of England for the last of the four, and so one of the most powerful men in Europe. Before him, the hereditary title of "Marshal" designated head of household security for the king of England; by the time he died, people throughout Europe (not just England) referred to him simply as 'the Marshal'. He received the title of '1st Earl of Pembroke' through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom.

    Early life
    William's father, John Marshal, supported King Stephen when he took the throne in 1135, but in about 1139 he changed sides to back the Empress Matilda in the civil war of succession between her and Stephen which led to the collapse of England into "the Anarchy".

    When King Stephen besieged Newbury Castle in 1152, according to William's biographer, he used the young William as a hostage to ensure that John kept his promise to surrender the castle. John, however, used the time allotted to reinforce the castle and alert Matilda's forces. When Stephen ordered John to surrender immediately or William would be hanged, John replied that he should go ahead saying, "I still have the hammer and the anvil with which to forge still more and better sons!" Subsequently there was a bluff made to launch William from a pierrière, a type of trebuchet towards the castle. Fortunately for the child, Stephen could not bring himself to harm young William. William remained a crown hostage for many months, only being released following the peace that resulted from the terms agreed at Winchester on 6 November 1153 that ended the civil war.

    Knight-Errant
    As a younger son of a minor nobleman, William had no lands or fortune to inherit, and had to make his own way in life. Around the age of twelve, when his father's career was faltering, he was sent to Normandy to be brought up in the household of William de Tancarville, a great magnate and cousin of young William's mother. Here he began his training as a knight. This would have included basic biblical stories and prayers written in Latin, as well as exposure to French romances, which conferred the basic precepts of chivalry to the budding knight. In addition, while in Tancarville’s household, it is likely that Marshal also learned important and lasting practical lessons concerning the politics of courtly life. According to his thirteenth-century biography, L'Histoire de Guillaume le Marechal, Marshal had a number of adversaries in court who machinated to his disadvantage—these individuals likely would have been threatened by the boy’s close relationship with the magnate. He was knighted in 1166 on campaign in Upper Normandy, then being invaded from Flanders. His first experience in battle came with mixed reviews. According to L'Histoire, everyone who witnessed the young knight in action agreed that he had acquitted himself well in combat. However, as medieval historian David Crouch explains, “War in the twelfth century was not fought wholly for honour. Profit was there to be made…” On this front, Marshal was not so successful, as he was unable to parlay his combat victories into profit from either ransom or seized booty. As described in L'Histoire, the Earl of Essex, who was expecting the customary tribute from his valorous knight following battle, jokingly remarked: “Oh? But Marshal, what are you saying? You had forty or sixty of them—yet you refuse me so small a thing!” In 1167 he was taken by William de Tancarville to his first tournament where he found his true métier. Quitting the Tancarville household he then served in the household of his mother's brother, Patrick, Earl of Salisbury. In 1168 his uncle was killed in an ambush by Guy de Lusignan. William was injured and captured in the same skirmish. It is known that William received a wound to his thigh and that someone in his captor's household took pity on the young knight. He received a loaf of bread in which were concealed several lengths of clean linen bandages with which he could dress his wounds. This act of kindness by an unknown person perhaps saved Marshal's life as infection setting into the wound could have killed him. After a period of time, he was ransomed by Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was apparently impressed by tales of his bravery. Thereafter he found he could make a good living out of winning tournaments. At that time tournaments were dangerous, often deadly, staged battles, not the jousting contests that would come later, and money and valuable prizes could be won by capturing and ransoming opponents, their horses and armour. His record is legendary: on his deathbed he recalled besting 500 knights during his tourneying career.

    Royal favour
    Upon his return during the course of 1185 William rejoined the court of King Henry II, and now served the father as a loyal captain through the many difficulties of his final years. The returns of royal favour were almost immediate. The king gave William the large royal estate of Cartmel in Cumbria, and the keeping of Heloise, the heiress of the northern barony of Lancaster. It may be that the king expected him to take the opportunity to marry her and become a northern baron, but William seems to have had grander ambitions for his marriage. In 1188 faced with an attempt by Philip II to seize the disputed region of Berry, Henry II summoned the Marshal to his side. The letter by which he did this survives, and makes some sarcastic comments about William's complaints that he had not been properly rewarded to date for his service to the king. Henry therefore promised him the marriage and lands of Dionisia, lady of Châteauroux in Berry. In the resulting campaign, the king fell out with his heir Richard, count of Poitou, who consequently allied with Philip II against his father. In 1189, while covering the flight of Henry II from Le Mans to Chinon, William unhorsed the undutiful Richard in a skirmish. William could have killed the prince but killed his horse instead, to make that point clear. He is said to have been the only man ever to unhorse Richard. Nonetheless after Henry's death, Marshal was welcomed at court by his former adversary, now King Richard I, who was wise to include a man whose legendary loyalty and military accomplishments were too useful to ignore, especially in a king who was intending to go on Crusade.

    During the old king's last days he had promised the Marshal the hand and estates of Isabel de Clare (c.1172–1220), but had not completed the arrangements. King Richard however, confirmed the offer and so in August 1189, at the age of 43, the Marshal married the 17-year-old daughter of Richard de Clare (Strongbow). Her father had been Earl of Pembroke, and Marshal acquired large estates and claims in England, Wales, Normandy and Ireland. Some estates however were excluded from the deal. Marshal did not obtain Pembroke and the title of earl, which his father-in-law had enjoyed, until 1199, as it had been taken into the king's hand in 1154. However, the marriage transformed the landless knight from a minor family into one of the richest men in the kingdom, a sign of his power and prestige at court. They had five sons and five daughters, and have numerous descendants. William made numerous improvements to his wife's lands, including extensive additions to Pembroke Castle and Chepstow Castle.

    William was included in the council of regency which the King appointed on his departure for the Third Crusade in 1190. He took the side of John, the king's brother, when the latter expelled the justiciar, William Longchamp, from the kingdom, but he soon discovered that the interests of John were different from those of Richard. Hence in 1193 he joined with the loyalists in making war upon him. In spring 1194, during the course of the hostilities in England and before King Richard's return, William Marshal's elder brother John Marshal (who was serving as seneschal) was killed while defending Marlborough for the king's brother John. Richard allowed Marshal to succeed his brother in the hereditary marshalship, and his paternal honour of Hamstead Marshall. The Marshal served the king in his wars in Normandy against Philip II. On Richard's death-bed the king designated Marshal as custodian of Rouen and of the royal treasure during the interregnum.

    King John and Magna Carta
    William supported King John when he became king in 1199, arguing against those who maintained the claims of Arthur of Brittany, the teenage son of John's elder brother Geoffrey Plantagenet. William was heavily engaged with the defence of Normandy against the growing pressure of the Capetian armies between 1200 and 1203. He sailed with King John when he abandoned the duchy in December 1203. He and the king had a falling out in the aftermath of the loss of the duchy, when he was sent with the earl of Leicester as ambassadors to negotiate a truce with King Philip II of France in 1204. The Marshal took the opportunity to negotiate the continued possession of his Norman lands. Before commencing negotiations with King Philip, William had been generously permitted to do homage to the King of France by King John so he might keep his possessions in Normandy; land which must have been of sentimental value due to the time spent there in his youth and adolescence. However, once official negotiations began, Philip demanded that such homage be paid exclusively to him, which King John had not consented to. When William paid homage to King Philip, John took offence and there was a major row at court which led to cool relations between the two men. This became outright hostility in 1207 when John began to move against several major Irish magnates, including William. Though he left for Leinster in 1207 William was recalled and humiliated at court in the autumn of 1208, while John's justiciar in Ireland Meilyr fitz Henry invaded his lands, burning the town of New Ross. Meilyr's defeat by Countess Isabel led to her husband's return to Leinster. He was once again in conflict with King John in his war with the Braose and Lacy families in 1210, but managed to survive. He stayed in Ireland until 1213, during which time he had Carlow Castle erected and restructured his honour of Leinster. Taken back into favour in 1212, he was summoned in 1213 to return to the English court. Despite their differences, William remained loyal throughout the hostilities between John and his barons which culminated on 15 June 1215 at Runnymede with the sealing of Magna Carta. William was one of the few English earls to remain loyal to the king through the First Barons' War. It was William whom King John trusted on his deathbed to make sure John's nine-year-old son Henry would get the throne. It was William who took responsibility for the king's funeral and burial at Worcester Cathedral.

    On 11 November 1216 at Gloucester, upon the death of King John, William Marshal was named by the king's council (the chief barons who had remained loyal to King John in the First Barons' War) to serve as protector of the nine-year-old King Henry III, and regent of the kingdom. In spite of his advanced age (around 70) he prosecuted the war against Prince Louis and the rebel barons with remarkable energy. In the battle of Lincoln he charged and fought at the head of the young King's army, leading them to victory. He was preparing to besiege Louis in London when the war was terminated by the naval victory of Hubert de Burgh in the straits of Dover.

    William was criticised for the generosity of the terms he accorded to Louis and the rebels in September 1217; but his desire for an expeditious settlement was dictated by sound statesmanship. Self-restraint and compromise were the keynote of Marshal's policy, hoping to secure peace and stability for his young liege. Both before and after the peace of 1217 he reissued Magna Carta, in which he is a signatory as one of the witnessing barons.

    Death and legacy
    Marshal's health finally failed him early in 1219. In March 1219 he realised that he was dying, so he summoned his eldest son, also William, and his household knights, and left the Tower of London for his estate at Caversham in Berkshire, near Reading, where he called a meeting of the barons, Henry III, the Papal legate Pandulf Masca, the royal justiciar (Hubert de Burgh), and Peter des Roches (Bishop of Winchester and the young King's guardian). William rejected the Bishop's claim to the regency and entrusted the regency to the care of the papal legate; he apparently did not trust the Bishop or any of the other magnates that he had gathered to this meeting. Fulfilling the vow he had made while on crusade, he was invested into the order of the Knights Templar on his deathbed. He died on 14 May 1219 at Caversham, and was buried in the Temple Church in London, where his tomb can still be seen.

    Descendants of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare
    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190–6 April 1231), married (1) Alice de Béthune, daughter of Earl of Albemarle; (2) 23 April 1224 Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John of England. They had no children.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191–16 April 1234), married Gervase le Dinant. He died in captivity. They had no children.
    Maud Marshal (1194–27 March 1248), married (1) Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, they had four children; (2) William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, they had two children; (3) Walter de Dunstanville.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1197–27 June 1241), married (1) Marjorie of Scotland, youngest daughter of King William I of Scotland; by an unknown mistress he had one illegitimate daughter:
    Isabel Marshal, married to Rhys ap Maeldon Fychan.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1199 – November 1245), married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, granddaughter of Hugh de Kevelioc, 3rd Earl of Chester. No children.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240), married (1) Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford, whose daughter Isabel de Clare married Robert Bruce, 5th Lord of Annandale, the grandfather of Robert the Bruce; (2) Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall
    Sibyl Marshal (c. 1201–27 April 1245), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby–they had seven daughters.
    Agnes Ferrers (died 11 May 1290), married William de Vesci.
    Isabel Ferrers (died before 26 November 1260)
    Maud Ferrers (died 12 March 1298), married (1) Simon de Kyme, and (2) William de Vivonia (de Forz), and (3) Amaury IX of Rochechouart.
    Sibyl Ferrers, married Sir Francis or Franco de Bohun.
    Joan Ferrers (died 1267)
    Agatha Ferrers (died May 1306), married Hugh Mortimer, of Chelmarsh.
    Eleanor Ferrers (died 16 October 1274), married to:
    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny
    Isabella de Braose (b.1222), married Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn. She died childless.
    Maud de Braose (1224–1301), in 1247, she married Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer and they had descendants.
    Eva de Braose (1227 – 28 July 1255), married Sir William de Cantelou and had descendants.
    Eleanor de Braose (c.1228–1251). On an unknown date after August 1241, she married Sir Humphrey de Bohun and had descendants.
    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (c. 1208–22 December 1245), married Maud de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 2nd Earl of Hereford. They had no children.
    Joan Marshal (1210–1234), married Warin de Munchensi (d. 1255), Lord of Swanscombe
    Joan de Munchensi (1230–20 September 1307) married William of Valence, the fourth son of King John's widow, Isabella of Angoulême, and her second husband, Hugh X of Lusignan, Count of La Marche. Valence was half-brother to Henry III and Edward I's uncle.

    The fate of the Marshal family
    During the civil wars in Ireland, William had taken two manors that the Bishop of Ferns claimed but could not get back. Some years after William's death, that bishop is said to have laid a curse on the family that William's sons would have no children, and the great Marshal estates would be scattered. Each of William's sons did become earl of Pembroke and marshal of England, and each died without legitimate issue. William's vast holdings were then divided among the husbands of his five daughters. The title of "Marshal" went to the husband of the oldest daughter, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, and later passed to the Mowbray dukes of Norfolk and then to the Howard dukes of Norfolk, becoming "Earl Marshal" along the way. The title of "Earl of Pembroke" passed to William of Valence, the husband of Joan Marshal's daughter, Joan de Munchensi; he became the first of the de Valence line of earls of Pembroke.
    Through his daughter Isabel, William is ancestor to the both the Bruce and Stewart kings of Scots. Through his granddaughter Maud de Braose, William is ancestor to the last Plantagenet kings, Edward IV through Richard III, and all English monarchs from Henry VIII and afterward.

    William Marshal in fiction
    William is the central figure in the Anglo-Norman History of William Marshal. History of William Marshal, ed. A.J. Holden, S. Gregory & D. Crouch, 3 vols., ANTS Occasional Publications 4–6 (London: Anglo-Norman Text Society, 2002–6)
    William appears (named only as the Earl of Pembroke) in William Shakespeare's historical play King John.
    William Marshal is a central character in the traditional English ballad "Queen Elanor's Confession" (Child 156), in which he is (fictitiously) revealed to have seduced Eleanor of Aquitaine while escorting her to England.
    Four generations of the Marshal family, from Isabel de Clare's parents through William fitzWilliam's fictitious bastard son, are the subjects of a series of four historical romances by Mary Pershall. Dawn of the White Rose (1985) is the one about William Marshal and Isabel de Clare.
    William Marshal appears in four of the books authored by Jean Plaidy on the Plantagenet Kings: The Revolt of the Eaglets (where he fights for Henry II), The Heart of the Lion (his relation with Richard Coeur de Lion), The Black Prince (his relation with King John Lackland) and The War of the Queens (in his role as regent of Henry III). His daughter Isabella also appears in the next book of the Saga, (The Queen came from Provence), as Richard of Cornwall's first wife
    William Marshal also appears as a supporting character in Thomas B. Costain's out of print novel Below the Salt, and Sharon Kay Penman's novels Time and Chance and Devil's Brood, as well as a minor appearance in Penman's When Christ and His Saints Slept, illustrating the story about young William's time as King Stephen's hostage and John Marshal's defiance.
    William Marshal makes appearance in James Blish's historical novel, Doctor Mirabilis. He appears at the Convocation at Westminster, and in absentia on his temporary break with Henry III. Blish himself acknowledges the historicity of Marshall, and further notes that in the company of Sir Miles Bonecor that they appear "...as martial spear carriers in this account...". Ultimately, William is merely a figure present in the plot as opposed to a significant mover of events within this particular novel.
    William Marshal is the main character of the novel A Pride of Kings by Juliet Dymoke, published by the New English Library in 1978.
    William Marshal is a significant secondary character in the novel The Witch Hunter by Bernard Knight, in the author's John Crowner medieval mystery series, published in 2004.
    A new novel about William Marshal, The Greatest Knight by Elizabeth Chadwick, based on primary sources and the main secondary source biographies of professors Painter, Duby and Crouch was published by Time Warner Books on 3 November 2005. A sequel, The Scarlet Lion followed in 2006. As one of the prominent historical figures of the period, Marshal also appears as a minor character in several of her other novels set around the same time.
    In film, Marshal makes a minor appearance in 1968's The Lion in Winter, portrayed by Nigel Stock. Clive Wood portrays Marshal in the 2003 remake.
    The author of The Lion in Winter, James Goldman, also used William Marshal as a supporting character in his novel about King John Myself As Witness (1979).
    Another novel about William and his wife is Champion (in German "Der Ritter der Könige) from Christian Balling of the year 1988.
    William Marshal is a major character in the novels The Devil is Loose and its sequel, Wolf at the Door by Graham Shelby. The books are about Richard Lionheart and King John, and are historical fictions about the events after the death of Henry II and the fall of the Angevin Empire.
    William Marshal also has 2 appearances in the historical romance novels "The Falcon and the Flower" and "The Dragon and the Jewel" by author Virginia Henley.
    He is a major character in Mike Walker's BBC Radio 4 series of plays Plantagenet and is played by Stephen Hogan.
    William Marshal is a major character in Sir Ridley Scott's Robin Hood epic who tries to convince King John to agree to the Magna Carta. He is played by William Hurt.
    In another Robin Hood movie, Bandit of Sherwood Forest (1946), as the regent William of Pembroke, played by Henry Daniell, an entirely fictitious characterisation as a scheming villain who kidnaps young Henry III and revokes the Magna Carta.
    William Marshal is also a key character in Christopher Morley's new play The King's Disposition.
    Peter Robert's radio play Holy Fool is about William Marshal (played by William Chubb) narrated by his squire (played by Michael Williams).
    A character named "Marshal" (played by James Purefoy), based loosely on the historical William Marshal, is the central character in the 2011 film Ironclad.
    An alternate history of William Marshal is in Martin Archer's multi-book saga "The Archers" - the young William is revealed as a young archer who evolves into William the Marshal and places his grandson on the throne.
    William Marshal is also the main inspiration for Heath Ledger's character, William Thatcher, in the movie A Knights Tale.2

Family: Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil b. 1172, d. 1220

  • Last Edited: 1 Apr 2016

Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil1,2

F, #7490, b. 1172, d. 1220

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales*.4,2
  • Marriage*: She married William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke, son of John Marshal Marshal of England and Sybilla (?) of Salisbury, in August 1189 in London, Greater London, England.1,5
  • Married Name: As of circa 1200,her married name was Marshal.4
  • Burial*: Isabella de Clare 4th Countess of Pembroke & Striguil was buried in 1220 in Tintern Abbey, Tintern, Monmouthshire, Wales*.2
  • Death*: She died in 1220 in Pembrokeshire, Wales*.2
  • Biography*: Isabel de Clare, suo jure Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (1172 – 1220), was a Cambro-Norman-Irish noblewoman and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served four successive kings as Lord Marshal of England. Her marriage had been arranged by King Richard I.

    Cambro-Normans were Normans who settled in southern Wales after the Norman conquest of England in 1066.

    Family inheritance
    Isabel was born in 1172 in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the eldest child of Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1130 – 20 April 1176), known to history as "Strongbow", and Aoife of Leinster, who was the daughter of Dermot MacMurrough, the deposed King of Leinster and Mor Ui Thuathail. The latter was a daughter of Muirchertach Ua Tuathail and Cacht Ní Morda. The marriage of Strongbow and Aoife took place in August 1170, the day after the capture of Waterford by the Cambro-Norman forces led by Strongbow.
    Isabel's paternal grandparents were Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. She had a younger brother Gilbert de Striguil who, being a minor, was not formally invested with either the earldom of Pembroke or of Striguil. It is unlikely that his father could have passed on the title to Pembroke as he himself did not possess it. When Gilbert died in 1185, Isabel became Countess of Pembroke in her own right (suo jure) until her death in 1220. In this way, she could be said to be the first successor to the earldom of Pembroke since her grandfather Gilbert, the first earl. By this reckoning, Isabel ought to be called the second countess, not the fourth countess of Pembroke. In any event, the title Earl was re-created for her husband as her consort. She also had an illegitimate half-sister Basile de Clare, who married three times. Basile's husbands were: Robert de Quincy; Raymond Fitzgerald, Constable of Leinster: Geoffrey FitzRobert, Baron of Kells.

    Isabel was described as having been "the good, the fair, the wise, the courteous lady of high degree". She allegedly spoke French, Irish and Latin. After her brother Gilbert's death, Isabel became one of the wealthiest heiresses in the kingdom, owning besides the titles of Pembroke and Striguil, much land in Wales and Ireland. She inherited the numerous castles on the inlet of Milford Haven, guarding the South Channel, including Pembroke Castle. She was a legal ward of King Henry II, who carefully watched over her inheritance.

    Marriage
    The new King Richard I arranged her marriage in August 1189 to William Marshal, regarded by many as the greatest knight and soldier in the realm. Henry II had promised Marshal he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son and successor Richard upheld the promise one month after his accession to the throne. At the time of her marriage, Isabel was residing in the Tower of London in the protective custody of the Justiciar of England, Ranulf de Glanville. Following the wedding, which was celebrated in London "with due pomp and ceremony", they spent their honeymoon at Stoke d'Abernon in Surrey which belonged to Enguerrand d'Abernon.

    Marriage to Isabel elevated William Marshal from the status as a landless knight into one of the richest men in the kingdom. He would serve as Lord Marshal of England, four kings in all: Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Although Marshal did not become the jure uxoris 1st Earl of Pembroke, Earl of Striguil until 1199, he nevertheless assumed overlordship of Leinster in Ireland, Pembroke Castle, Chepstow Castle, as well as Isabel's other castles in Wales such as the keep of Haverford, Tenby, Lewhaden, Narberth, Stackpole.

    Shortly after their marriage, Marshal and Isabel arrived in Ireland, at Old Ros, a settlement located in the territory which belonged to her grandfather, Dermot MacMurrough. A motte was hastily constructed, a medieval borough quickly grew around it, and afterwards the Marshals founded the port town by the river which subsequently became known as New Ross. The Chronicles of Ros, which are housed in the British Museum, described Isabel and Marshal's arrival in Ireland and records that Isabella set about building a lovely city on the banks of the Barrow.

    In 1192, Isabel and her husband assumed the task of managing their vast lands; starting with the rebuilding of Kilkenny Castle and the town, both of which had been damaged by the O'Brien clan in 1173. Later they commissioned the construction of several abbeys in the vicinity.

    The marriage was happy, despite the vast difference in age between them. William Marshal and Isabel produced a total of five sons and five daughters.

    Issue
    William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (1190 – 6 April 1231). Chief Justiciar of Ireland. He married firstly, Alice de Bethune, and secondly, Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of King John. He died childless.
    Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (1191 – 1 April 1234 Kilkenny Castle, Ireland), married Gervase le Dinant. He died childless.
    Maud Marshal (1192 – 27 March 1248). She married firstly, Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, by whom she had issue; she married secondly, William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, by whom she had issue, including John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey who married Alice le Brun de Lusignan; she married thirdly, Walter de Dunstanville. Five queen consorts of Henry VIII: Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard and Catherine Parr were her descendants.
    Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke (1194 – 27 June 1241). He married firstly, Marjorie of Scotland, daughter of King William I of Scotland; and secondly, Maud de Lanvaley. He died childless.
    Walter Marshal, 5th Earl of Pembroke (1196 – 24 November 1245). He married Margaret de Quincy, Countess of Lincoln, widow of John de Lacy, 1st Earl of Lincoln, as her second husband. The marriage was childless.
    Anselm Marshal, 6th Earl of Pembroke (1198 – 22 December 1245). He married Maud de Bohun. He died childless.
    Isabel Marshal (9 October 1200 – 17 January 1240). She married firstly, Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Hertford; and secondly, Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall. She had issue by both marriages. King Robert I of Scotland and Queen consorts Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard and Catherine Parr were descendants.
    Sibyl Marshal (1201 – before 1238), married William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby, by whom she had issue. Queen consort Catherine Parr was a descendant.
    Joan Marshal (1202–1234), married Warin de Munchensi, Lord of Swanscombe, by whom she had issue. Both queen consorts Jane Seymour and Catherine Parr were descendants.
    Eva Marshal (1203–1246), married William de Braose (died 1230). Queen consorts Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr were her descendants.

    Legacy
    Isabel died in Pembrokeshire, Wales in 1220 at the age of forty-eight. Her husband had died the year before. She was buried at Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire; however a cenotaph was discovered inside St. Mary's Church in New Ross, Ireland whose slab bears the partial inscription "ISABEL: LAEGN" and her engraved likeness.

    It was suggested in 1892 by Paul Meyer that Isabel might have encouraged the composition of the Song of Dermot which narrates the exploits of her father and maternal grandfather. However, the Song of Dermot as now known was composed a few years after her death (though based on earlier writings).

    Although her daughters had many children, Isabel's five sons, curiously, died childless. This is supposedly attributed to a curse placed upon William Marshal by the Irish Bishop of Ferns. The title of marshal subsequently passed to Hugh de Bigod, husband of Isabel's eldest daughter Maud, while the title of Earl of Pembroke went to William de Valence, 1st Earl of Pembroke, the husband of Joan de Munchensi, daughter of Joan Marshal. He was the first of the de Valence line of the earls of Pembroke.

    Within a few generations their descendants included much of the nobility of Europe including all the monarchs of Scotland since Robert I (1274-1329) and all those of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom since Henry IV (1367-1413); and, apart from Anne of Cleves, all the queen consorts of Henry VIII.3,2

Family: William Marshal 1st Earl of Pembroke b. 1146 or 1147, d. 14 May 1219

  • Last Edited: 25 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10125.htm#i101241
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10292.htm#i102913
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isabel_de_Clare,_4th_Countess_of_Pembroke.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10292.htm#i102913
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10125.htm#i101241
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p64.htm#i633

Richard Fitzgilbert de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke1

M, #7493, b. circa 1130, d. 20 April 1176

An image of the seal of Richard de Clare

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Birth*: Richard Fitzgilbert de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke was born circa 1130 in Wales*.3,4
  • Marriage*: He married Aoife MacMorrough, daughter of Dermot MacMorrough King of Leinster and Mór Ní Tuathail Queen-consort of Leinster, circa 26 August 1171.3
  • Death*: Richard Fitzgilbert de Clare 2nd Earl of Pembroke died on 20 April 1176 in Ireland.2,4
  • Burial*: He was buried after 20 April 1176 in graveyard of the Ferns Cathedral, Ferns, Wexford, Ireland.4
  • Biography*: Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (of the first creation), Lord of Leinster, Justiciar of Ireland (1130 – 20 April 1176). Like his father, he was also commonly known by his nickname Strongbow (Norman French: Arc-Fort). He was a Cambro-Norman lord notable for his leading role in the Norman invasion of Ireland.

    Career
    Richard was the son of Gilbert de Clare, 1st Earl of Pembroke and Isabel de Beaumont. Richard's father died in about 1148, when he was about 18 years old, and Richard inherited the title Earl of Pembroke. It is probable that this title was not recognized at Henry II's coronation in 1154. As the son of the first Earl, he succeeded to his father's estates in 1148, but was deprived of the title by King Henry II of England in 1154 for siding with King Stephen of England against Henry’s mother, the Empress Matilda. Richard was in fact, called by his contemporaries Earl Striguil, for his marcher lordship of Striguil where he had a fortress at a place now called Chepstow, in Monmouthshire on the River Wye. He saw an opportunity to reverse his bad fortune in 1168 when he met Diarmait Mac Murchada, the deposed King of Leinster.

    Dispossession of the King of Leinster
    In 1167, Diarmait Mac Murchada was deprived of the Kingdom of Leinster by the High King of Ireland - Rory O'Connor (Irish: Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair). The grounds for the dispossession were that MacMurrough had, in 1152, abducted Derbforgaill, the wife of the King of Breifne, Tiernan O'Rourke (Irish: Tighearnán Ua Ruairc). To recover his kingdom, MacMurrough solicited help from the King of England - Henry II. The deposed king embarked for Bristol from near Bannow on 1 August 1166. He met Henry in Aquitaine in the Autumn of 1166. Henry could not help him at this time, but provided a letter of comfort for willing supporters of Mac Murchada's cause in his kingdom. However, after his return to Wales he failed to rally any forces to his standard. He eventually met the Earl of Striguil (nicknamed "Strongbow") and other barons of the Welsh Marches. Mac Murchada came to an agreement with de Clare: for the Earl’s assistance with an army the following spring, he could have Aoife, Mac Murchada's eldest daughter in marriage and the succession to Leinster. As Henry’s approval or license to Mac Murchada was a general one, the Earl of Striguil thought it prudent to obtain Henry's specific consent to travel to Ireland: he waited two years to do this. The license he got was to aid Mac Murchada in the recovery of his kingdom of Leinster.

    The invasion of Leinster
    An army was assembled that included Welsh archers. It was led by Raymond FitzGerald (also known as Raymond le Gros) and in quick succession it took the Viking-established towns of Wexford, Waterford and Dublin in 1169-1170. Strongbow, however, was not with the first invading party, only arriving later, in August 1170.

    In May 1171, Diarmuid Mac Murchada died and his son, Donal MacMurrough-Kavanagh (Irish: Domhnall Caemanach mac Murchada) claimed the kingdom of Leinster in accordance with his rights under the Brehon Laws. The Earl of Striguil also claimed the kingship in the right of his wife. The old king's death was the signal of a general rising, and Richard barely managed to keep Rory O'Connor out of Dublin. At this time Strongbow sent his uncle, Hervey de Montmorency, on an embassy to Henry. This was necessary to appease the King who was growing restive at the Earl's increasing power. Upon his return, de Montmorency conveyed the King's terms - the return of Strongbow's lands in Normandy, England and Wales as well as leaving him in possession of his Irish lands. In return, de Clare surrendered Dublin, Waterford and other fortresses to the King. Henry's intervention was successful and both the Irish and Cambro-Norman lords in the south and east of Ireland accepted his rule. Strongbow also agreed to assist the King in his coming war in France.

    Marriage and issue
    By an unknown mistress, Richard had:
    Aline de Clare, she married William FitzMaurice FitzGerald, baron of Nass
    Basilia de Clare, she married Robert de Quenci, Constable of Leinster

    About 26 August 1171 in Waterford, Strongbow married MacMurrough's daughter, Aoife MacMurrough. Their children were:
    Gilbert de Clare, 3rd Earl of Pembroke, a minor who died in 1185
    Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke, who became Countess of Pembroke in her own right in 1185 (on the death of her brother) until her own death in 1220.
    King Henry II had promised Sir William Marshal that he would be given Isabel as his bride, and his son Richard I upheld the promise one month after his ascension to the throne. The earldom was given to her husband as her consort. Marshall was the son of John the Marshal, by Sibylle, the sister of Patrick, Earl of Salisbury.
    Strongbow's widow, Aoife, lived on and was last recorded in a charter of 1188.

    Legacy
    Strongbow was the statesman, whereas Raymond was the soldier, of the conquest. He is vividly described by Giraldus Cambrensis as a tall and fair man, of pleasing appearance, modest in his bearing, delicate in features, of a low voice, but sage in council and the idol of his soldiers. He was first interred in Dublin's Christ Church Cathedral where an alleged effigy can be viewed. Strongbow's actual tomb-effigy was destroyed when the roof of the Cathedral collapsed in 1562. The one on display dates from around the 15th century, bears the coat of arms of the Earls of Kildare and is the effigy of another local Knight. Strongbow is actually buried in the graveyard of the Ferns Cathedral where his grave can be seen in the graveyard.

    A fictionalized account of Richard and Aoife can be had in Strongbow, The Story of Richard and Aoife by Morgan Llywelyn.5,4

Family: Aoife MacMorrough b. c 1150, d. a 1189

  • Last Edited: 15 Aug 2015

Aoife MacMorrough1

F, #7494, b. circa 1150, d. after 1189

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2016

Gilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Pembroke1

M, #7495, b. circa 1100, d. 6 January 1148

Seal of Gilbert fitz Gilbert, from Lansdowne MS. 203

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Gilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Pembroke was born circa 1100 in England.3
  • Marriage*: He married Isabella de Beaumont of Meulan circa 1130 in England.1
  • Death*: Gilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Pembroke died on 6 January 1148 in England.2,4
  • Biography*: Gilbert fitz Gilbert de Clare (c.?1100 – 6 January 1148), was created Earl of Pembroke in 1138. He was nicknamed Strongbow at an unknown age for his skilled use of the long bow.

    Life
    Born at Tonbridge, Gilbert de Clare was a son of Gilbert Fitz Richard de Clare and Alice de Claremont. He started out without land and wealth of his own but was closely related to very powerful men, specifically his uncles Walter de Clare and Roger de Clare.

    In 1136 Gilbert fitz Gilbert led an expedition against Exmes and burned parts of the town, including the church of Notre Dame, but was interrupted by the forces of William III, Count of Ponthieu and escaped the resulting melee only after suffering heavy losses. Gilbert was a Baron, that is, a tenant-in-chief in England, and inherited the estates of his paternal uncles, Roger and Walter, which included the baronies and castles of Bienfaite and Orbec in Normandy. He held the lordship of Nether Gwent and the castle of Striguil (later Chepstow). King Stephen created him Earl of Pembroke, and gave him the rape and castle of Pevensey.

    After Stephen's defeat at Lincoln on 2 February 1141, Gilbert was among those who rallied to Empress Matilda when she recovered London in June, but he was at Canterbury when Stephen was recrowned late in 1141. He then joined Geoffrey's plot against Stephen, but when that conspiracy collapsed, he again adhered to Stephen, being with him at the siege of Oxford late in 1142. In 1147 he rebelled when Stephen refused to give him the castles surrendered by his nephew Gilbert, 2nd Earl of Hertford, whereupon the King marched to his nearest castle and nearly captured him. However, the Earl appears to have made his peace with Stephen before his death the following year.

    Family
    He married Isabel de Beaumont, before 1130, daughter of Sir Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, Count of Meulan, and Elizabeth de Vermandois. Isabel had previously been the mistress of King Henry I of England.

    By her Gilbert had:
    Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke
    Basilia who married Raymond FitzGerald.
    a daughter who married William Bloet.2,4
  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104656
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104656
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_de_Clare,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke.

Isabella de Beaumont of Meulan1,2

F, #7496, b. circa 1110

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Gilbert de Clare 1st Earl of Pembroke b. c 1100, d. 6 Jan 1148

  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104656
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_de_Clare,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke.

Gilbert Fitz Richard1

M, #7497, b. before 1066, d. 1114

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Adeliza de Clermont b. c 1058

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158420
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158420
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15835.htm#i158349

Adeliza de Clermont1

F, #7498, b. circa 1058

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

Family: Gilbert Fitz Richard b. b 1066, d. 1114

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15843.htm#i158421
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10466.htm#i104655
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158420
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15835.htm#i158349

Richard fitz Gilbert1

M, #7499, b. circa 1024, d. circa 1090

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard fitz Gilbert was born circa 1024 in Bienfaite, Normandy, France.3
  • Marriage*: He married Rohese Giffard, daughter of Walter Giffard Seigneur de Longueville and Agnes Ermentrude Fleitel, circa 1054.3
  • Burial*: Richard fitz Gilbert was buried circa 1090 in St. Neots, Huntingdonshire, England.2
  • Death*: He died circa 1090 in England.2
  • Biography*: He was also known as Richard de Clare. He gained the title of Lord of Bienfaite [Normandy]. Richard fitz Gilbert also went by the nick-name of Richard de Bienfaite. He gained the title of Lord of Orbec [Normandy]. Circa 1066 he accompanied William the Conqueror to England. He received 176 Lordships, 95 in Suffolk. He was created 1st Lord of Clare [feudal baron]. In 1075 He helped to suppress the revolt. He held the office of Joint Chief Justiciar. He has an extensive biographical entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

    Clare, Richard de d. 1090?, founder of the house of Clare, was a son of Count Gilbert. Though here, for convenience, inserted among the Clares, he was known at the time as Richard de Bienfaite, Richard the son of Count Gilbert, Richard FitzGilbert, or Richard of Tonbridge, the last three of these styles being those under which he appears in Domesday. He is, however, once entered (in the Suffolk invasiones) as Richard de Clare (Domesday, ii. 448 a). It was probably in 1070 that, with his brother, he witnessed a charter of William at Salisbury. On William's departure for Normandy he was appointed, with William of Warrenne, chief justiciar (or regent), and in that capacity took a leading part in the suppression of the revolt of 1075 (Ord. Vit. ii. 262). He is further found in attendance on the king at Berkeley, Christmas 1080 (Glouc. Cart. i. 374), and again, with his brother, at Winchester in 1081 (Mon. Angl. iii. 141).

    The date of his death is somewhat uncertain. Ordericus alludes to him as lately (nuper) dead in 1091, yet apparently implies that at this very time he was captured at the siege of Courcy. From Domesday we learn that he received in England some hundred and seventy lordships, of which ninety-five were in Suffolk, attached to his castle of Clare.

    In Kent he held another stronghold, the castle of Tunbridge, with its appendant Lowy (Lega), of which the continuator of William of Jumièges asserts that he received it in exchange for his claim on his father's comté of Brionne, while the Tintern Genealogia states that he obtained it by exchange from the see of Canterbury, which is confirmed by the fact that, in later days, it was claimed by Becket as having been wrongly alienated, and homage for its tenure exacted from the earls. By Stapleton and Ormerod it has been held that he received the lordship of Chepstow as an escheat in 1075, but for this there is no foundation.

    The abbey of Bec received from him a cell, afterwards an alien priory, at Tooting. He married Rohaise, the daughter of Walter Giffard the elder, through whom his descendants became coheirs to the Giffard estates. She held lands at St. Neot's (Domesday), and there founded a religious house, where her husband is said to have been buried. She was still living as his widow in 1113, and is commonly, but wrongly, said to have married her son-in-law, Eudes the sewer.

    By her Richard FitzGilbert left several children. Of these Roger, mentioned first by Ordericus, was probably the eldest, though he is commonly, as by Stapleton, styled the second. He had sided with Robert in the revolt of 1077-8, and is said by the continuator of William of Jumièges to have received from Robert the castle of Hommez in exchange for his claims on Brionne, but it was, according to Ordericus, his cousin Robert FitzBaldwin who made and pressed the claim to Brionne. Roger, who witnessed as Roger de Clare (apparently the earliest occurrence of the name) a charter to St. Evreul about 1080, was his father's heir in Normandy, but left no issue. The other sons were Gilbert (d. 1115?), the heir in England, Walter, Robert, said to be ancestor of the Barons FitzWalter, and Richard a monk of Bec, who was made abbot of Ely on the accession of Henry I, deprived in 1102, and restored in 1107. There was also a daughter Rohaise, married about 1088 to Eudes the sewer.4

Family: Rohese Giffard b. 1034, d. a 1113

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Rohese Giffard1

F, #7500, b. 1034, d. after 1113

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Richard fitz Gilbert b. c 1024, d. c 1090

  • Last Edited: 13 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158420
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15843.htm#i158425
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p15842.htm#i158420
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p15843.htm#i158424