Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale1,2

M, #7441, b. circa 1138, d. between 1189 and 1194

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale was born circa 1138 in Annandale, Scotland.1,4
  • Marriage*: He married Euphemia (?) circa 1170 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale died between 1189 and 1194 in Scotland.4
  • Biography*: Robert II de Brus, le Meschin (the Cadet) (fl. 1138, died c.?1189 or 1194), was a 12th-century Norman noble and 2nd Lord of Annandale. He was the son, perhaps the second son, of Robert de Brus, 1st Lord of Annandale.

    The elder de Brus' allegiances were compromised when David I invaded England in the later 1130s, and he had renounced his fealty to David before the Battle of the Standard in 1138. The younger Robert however remained loyal and took over his father's land in Scotland, whilst the English territories remained with the elder Robert and passed to the latter's elder son Adam. Bruce family tradition has it that Robert II was captured by his father at the battle and given over to King Stephen of England.

    A legend tells that in the 1140s, Robert II was visited at Annan by St Malachy. St Malachy asked Robert to pardon a thief, but Robert hanged him anyway, and for this the River Annan destroyed part of his castle and the de Brus line received a curse from the holy man. Robert made Lochmaben the centre of his lordship and constructed a new caput there.

    He married Euphemia de Crosebi or Crosbj of Aumale, daughter of Sir Adam de Crosebi or Crosbj. They had five known children:
    Robert (d. 1191), eldest son.
    William (d. 1212).
    Bernard.
    Agatha.
    Euphemia.

    Robert was buried at Gisborough Priory in the North Riding, Yorkshire, England, a monastery founded by his father Robert I de Brus. As his eldest son, Robert, predeceased him, he was succeeded by his second son William.4

Family: Euphemia (?) b. c 1150

  • Last Edited: 22 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4582
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Brus,_3rd_Lord_of_Annandale.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p41190.htm#i411891
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_2nd_Lord_of_Annandale.

Euphemia (?)1

F, #7442, b. circa 1150

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale b. c 1138, d. bt 1189 - 1194

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p459.htm#i4582

Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale1,2

M, #7443, b. circa 1070, d. 1142

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale was born circa 1070 in England.1,4
  • Death*: He died in 1142 in Scotland.5,4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 22 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p41190.htm#i411891
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Brus,_3rd_Lord_of_Annandale.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396466
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_de_Brus,_1st_Lord_of_Annandale.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396467

Adam Bruce1

M, #7444, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Emma Ramsay b. c 1100

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396466
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396467
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39648.htm#i396472
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p41190.htm#i411891

Emma Ramsay1

F, #7445, b. circa 1100

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Emma Ramsay was born circa 1100.1
  • Marriage*: She married Adam Bruce, son of Robert de Brus and Emma (?), circa 1125.3
  • Married Name: As of circa 1125,her married name was Bruce.3

Family: Adam Bruce b. c 1100

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396466
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396468
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p41190.htm#i411891

Sir William Ramsay1

M, #7446, b. circa 1080

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir William Ramsay was born circa 1080.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396468

Robert de Brus1

M, #7447

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert de Brus was born.1
  • Marriage*: He married Emma (?) circa 1100.2

Family: Emma (?)

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39647.htm#i396467
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39648.htm#i396472

Emma (?)1

F, #7448

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Marriage*: Emma (?) married Robert de Brus circa 1100.1
  • Married Name: As of circa 1100,her married name was de Brus.1

Family: Robert de Brus

  • Last Edited: 5 Jun 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p39648.htm#i396472

Helen ferch Daffyd1

F, #7449, b. before 1246, d. after February 1294

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Donald (?) 6th Earl of Mar b. c 1230, d. 1365

  • Last Edited: 15 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10209.htm#i102090
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p12728.htm#i127280
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10209.htm#i102090
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p4179.htm#i41782
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10916.htm#i109156
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10209.htm#i102090
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p12728.htm#i127280
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10788.htm#i107878
  7. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p2587.htm#i25864

William (?) 5th Earl of Mar1

M, #7450, b. circa 1225, d. between 16 May 1262 and November 1291

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William (?) 5th Earl of Mar was born circa 1225 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died between 16 May 1262 and November 1291 in Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: He married Elizabeth Comyn, daughter of William Comyn Earl of Buchan and Margaret (?) Countess of Buchan, before 1267 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 5th Earl of Mar before 7 February 1243/44. He was Chamberlain to King Alexander III of the Scots circa 1252. He was member of the Council of Regency of Scotland circa 1255. He held the office of Chamberlain of Scotalnd between 1262 and 1264.1 He held the office of Sheriff of Dunbartonshire between 1264 and 1266.

    Uilleam of Mar, or Uilleam mac Dhonnchaidh (Anglicized: William, Duncan's son), was perhaps the greatest of the mormaers of Mar ruling from 1244 to 1276, also known as Earl of Mar.

    Uilleam was responsible for the construction of Kildrummy Castle, the greatest castle to have been built in 13th century northern Scotland. It is one of the few examples where a native Scottish magnate built a large-scale fortification, something normally practiced by the incoming French.

    Uilleam, more than any of his predecessors, participated in Scottish and even British-wide politics, becoming a leading figure in the royal regime of Alexander II, and the minority of Alexander III. By 1244, Uilleam had married into the Comyn house, the fastest rising French family in the Scottish kingdom. He married Elisabeth Comyn, the daughter of William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan. The Comyn-Mar alliance helped fight off the ambitions of the Durwards, who were then in prime favor with the king.
    Alan Durward used his descent from a daughter of Gille Críst to contest Uilleam's right to the Mormaerdom, but Uilleam successfully held off these claims. Uilleam and the Comyn Earl of Menteith then launched accusations of treason towards Alan while at the court of Henry III of England at York.

    Uilleam engaged in supplementing his power on a nation-wide basis. He held the post of Sheriff of Dumbarton between 1264 and 1266, a post which opened up connections in the western Highlands. Uilleam was able to marry his younger son Donnchadh to Christina MacRuaridh, the heiress of the Hebridean chief Alan MacRuadridh, the principal Hebridean supporter of the Scottish cause against Norway.

    When his wife Isabel died in 1267, Uilleam married Muriel, the daughter of Maol Íosa II, Mormaer of Strathearn.

    Uilleam died in 1276, and was succeeded by his son Domhnall.2,3

Family: Elizabeth Comyn b. c 1225, d. 1267

  • Last Edited: 30 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10916.htm#i109156
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4591
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uilleam,_Earl_of_Mar.

Elizabeth Comyn1

F, #7451, b. circa 1225, d. 1267

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William (?) 5th Earl of Mar b. c 1225, d. bt 16 May 1262 - Nov 1291

  • Last Edited: 17 Jun 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10916.htm#i109156
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4592

Duncan (?) 4th Earl of Mar1

M, #7452, b. 1203, d. after 7 February 1244

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name-Gaelic: Duncan (?) 4th Earl of Mar was also known in Gaelic as Donnchadh (?) Earl of Mar.3
  • Birth*: He was born in 1203 in Mar, Scotland.1,3
  • Death*: He died after 7 February 1244 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 4th Earl of Mar [S., c. 1115] before 29 August 1229.1 In 1237 he was witness to the Anglo-Scottish agreement sealed in the autumn 1237.

    Donnchadh of Mar (Anglicized as Duncan is the fifth known Mormaer of Mar or Earl of Mar, 1203–1244.

    Donnchadh was the son of Morggán and Agnes. Donnchadh benefited from the introduction of feudal primogeniture as a custom, as it enabled him and his kin to exclude the descendants of Gille Críst, whose contemporary leader was Thomas de Lundin, from the succession. Perhaps in gratitude, he named his oldest son William after King Willian I, the probable source of the innovation in Mar's inheritance custom. He married Orabillis of Nessius, by whom he fathered William, and died in 1244.2,3

Family:

  • Last Edited: 14 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4591
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4593
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Mar.
  4. [S829] Clanmacfarlanegenealogy Website, online Clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info, http://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/…

Morgund Mac Gylocher 2nd Mormaer or Earl of Mar1,2

M, #7453, b. before 1147, d. after 1203

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Morgund Mac Gylocher 2nd Mormaer or Earl of Mar was born before 1147 in Mar, Scotland.4
  • Marriage*: He married Agnes (?) circa 1160 in Scotland.5
  • Death*: Morgund Mac Gylocher 2nd Mormaer or Earl of Mar died after 1203 in Scotland.5
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 2nd Earl of Mar [S., c. 1115] after 1133. Before 1152 he was witness to a charter of King David I and his son Henry to Dunfermline.

    The Mormaer or Earl of Mar is a title that has been reaffirmed seven times, all in the Peerage of Scotland. The first creation of the earldom was originally the provincial ruler of the province of Mar in north-eastern Scotland. First attested in the year 1014, the "family seat" eventually became Kildrummy Castle, although other sites like Doune of Invernochty were initially just as important.

    Early mormaers or earls

    The first Mormaer of Mar is usually regarded as Ruadrí (fl. 1131), mentioned in the Book of Deer. Some modern sources give earlier mormaers, i.e. Muirchertach (Latinized as Martachus) and Gartnait (sometimes Gratnach), mentioned respectively in charters of the reigns of king Máel Coluim III (relating to the Céli Dé establishment of Loch Leven) and king Alexander I (relating to the monastic establishment of Scone), though in these cases certain identification with a particular province is difficult. The accounts of the Battle of Clontarf in some of the Irish annals name "Domnall son of Eimen son of Cainnech", Mormaer of Mar in Alba", as among those killed alongside Brian Boru.

    The principal seats of the Mormaerdom were Migvie and Doune of Invernochty. The Mormaerdom seems initially to have rotated between two kin-groups, that represented by Morggán, and that represented by Gille Críst. The Mormaerdom was split upon the accession of Donnchadh, a descendant of Morggán. Donnchadh got the title of Mormaer and the wealthier and militarily more useful upland parts of Mar, and Thomas Durward, a descendant of Gille Críst through the female line, got the coastal, low-lying arable land. The line of Mormaers ended when Mormaer Thomas died childless in 1374.

    Morggán of Mar, is the first Mormaer or Earl of Mar to appear in history as "more than a characterless name in a witness-list.".[1] His father was Gille Chlerig. He is often known as Morgrund or Morgan.

    It is possible that Morggán participated in the so-called Revolt of the Earls, a protest by some of the native Scottish nobility at King Máel Coluim IV's trip to France as a vassal of King Henry II of England.

    It is also possible that he became estranged from the French-speaking king William I, as Morggán's name appears in no royal acta of the latter king's reign.

    He married Agnes, a patroness of churches. Agnes was probably related to the de Warenne family - the family who married Ada de Warenne to Henry of Scotland and mother of Kings Malcolm IV and William the Lion. Morggán and Ada had at least one son, Donnchad, who eventually succeeded to the Mormaerdom. Morggán had another two sons, Máel Coluim and James, but they may have been illegitimate - i.e. the product of an uncanonical marriage acceptable in the Celtic system, but not in the Franco-Roman system then gaining favour in Scotland.

    His daughter Alesta of Mar was married to Alan Fitzwalter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland and was mother to Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland.

    He appears in royal charters dated as early as 1147. He is attested in the documents for the last time in 1178, and was certainly dead by 1183.2,6

Family 1:

Family 2: Agnes (?) b. c 1125

  • Last Edited: 14 Sep 2016

Agnes (?)1

F, #7454, b. circa 1125

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Morgund Mac Gylocher 2nd Mormaer or Earl of Mar b. b 1147, d. a 1203

  • Last Edited: 14 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p460.htm#i4593
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh,_Earl_of_Mar.

Sir John Erskine1

M, #7455, b. 1270

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Sir John Erskine was born in 1270 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10792.htm#i107920

William Mure of Rowallan1

M, #7456, b. circa 1290, d. circa 1348

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William Mure of Rowallan was born circa 1290 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married (?) Lindsay circa 1320 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: William Mure of Rowallan died circa 1348 in Scotland.2

Family: (?) Lindsay b. c 1290

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102461
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4659

(?) Lindsay1

F, #7457, b. circa 1290

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William Mure of Rowallan b. c 1290, d. c 1348

  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102461

Sir Archibald Mure of Rowallan1

M, #7458, b. circa 1260, d. circa 1348

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Margaret de Montgomery

  • Last Edited: 13 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4659
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4661

Margaret de Montgomery1

F, #7459

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Sir Archibald Mure of Rowallan b. c 1260, d. c 1348

  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4659
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4666

Sir John de Montgomery1

M, #7460, d. circa 1285

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4666

Ronald Mure of Pokellie1

M, #7461, b. circa 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ronald Mure of Pokellie was born circa 1275 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 5 Dec 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p466.htm#i4653

Hugh de Ross 4th Earl of Ross1

M, #7462, b. circa 1280, d. 19 July 1333

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Hugh de Ross 4th Earl of Ross was also known as Aodh de Ross 4th Earl of Ross.3
  • Birth*: He was born circa 1280 in Scotland.3
  • Marriage: He married Matilda Bruce, daughter of Robert de Brus Le vieil, First Lord of Brus and Margaret (?) Countess of Carrick, circa 1308 in Scotland.2
  • Death*: Hugh de Ross 4th Earl of Ross died on 19 July 1333 in killed in action at Halidon Hill, Scotland.4
  • Biography: Hugh [probably Gaelic: Aodh], was the third successor of Ferchar mac in tSagairt as Mormaer of Ross (1323–1333).

    Hugh was a favorite of King Robert I of Scotland, who endowed him with many lands. Aodh even married Robert's sister, Matilda. Aodh's young brother, Iain, was given marriage to the Margaret Comyn, heiress of Buchan (although he died childless).

    Hugh was married twice: (1) Matilda, sister of Robert I "the Bruce", King of Scots, and (2) Margaret de Graham, daughter of Sir David de Graham of Montrose. With Matilda, Hugh had several children, including his son and successor William. By Margaret, Hugh had at least one daughter Euphemia de Ross, who married (1) John Randolph, 3rd Earl of Moray and (2) by dispensation (due to affinity) Robert Stewart, Earl of Strathearn, subsequently Robert II, King of Scots (1371–1390) as his second wife. Euphemia is sometimes incorrectly assigned as a daughter of Matilda, but this would have involved consanguinity in the 2nd and 3rd degrees which was not stated in the dispensation for her marriage to Robert Stewart [3rd degree of affinity, and 4th degree of consanguinity: Andrew Stuart, Genealogical History of the Stewarts, pp. 420–421]. Hugh and Margaret Graham are usually also assigned a daughter Janet, wife of Sir John de Monymusk [Scots Peerage VII:237, cites Anderson's Dip. Scot., p. lix, and Earldom of Strathern, Nicolas]. This has been found to be erroneous, as Janet was actually Janet de Barclay, daughter of Margaret de Graham by her 2nd husband, John de Barclay of Gartley [see John Ravilious, "The Ancestry of Euphemia, Countess of Ross: Heraldry as Genealogical Evidence", in The Scottish Genealogist Vol. LV, No. 1 (March 2008)]. All received prestigious marriage partners (including to the earls of Buchan and Moray, to Maol Íosa IV, Earl of Strathearn and the future king Robert II.

    He was killed along many other Scottish nobles at the Battle of Halidon Hill on 19 July 1333, and was succeeded by his son and successor, Uilleam.2,5

Family 1: Matilda Bruce b. c 1280

  • Last Edited: 21 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10532.htm#i105313
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107897
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107898
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107898
    http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107897
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh,_Earl_of_Ross.

Margaret Graham1

F, #7463, b. circa 1300

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Margaret Graham was born circa 1300 in Scotland.1
  • Married Name: As of circa 1329,her married name was de Ross.1
  • Marriage*: She married an unknown person before 29 November 1329 in Scotland.1,3
  • Last Edited: 1 Oct 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10532.htm#i105313
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10809.htm#i108086
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107897

William II de Ross 3rd Earl of Ross1

M, #7464, b. circa 1255, d. 28 January 1323

A bust of Uilleam II, made for display in the Tain Museum.

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William II de Ross 3rd Earl of Ross was born circa 1255 in Scotland.1
  • Marriage*: He married Euphemia de Berkeley, daughter of Sir Hugh de Berkeley, circa 1280 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: William II de Ross 3rd Earl of Ross died on 28 January 1323 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Uilleam II of Ross was the second successor of Ferchar mac in tSagairt, as Mormaer of Ross (1274–1323).

    In 1284 he joined with other Scottish noblemen who acknowledged Margaret of Norway as the heir of Alexander. At the beginning of the Wars of Scottish Independence Uilleam was captured fighting against the English at the Battle of Dunbar. After which, like many Gaelic lords, he became pro-English and one of the most early enemies of Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick. Uilleam had been in English custody, but his wife Euphemia had obtained his release, and Uilleam was appointed Edward I of England's warden of Scotland north of the Grampians.

    When a band of Bruce supporters, including the Countess of Atholl, Bruce's wife Elizabeth de Burgh, his daughter Marjorie and Robert's brother Niall took refuge in St Duthac's chapel in Tain, Uilleam arrested them and handed them over to the English crown. The men were executed.

    This put Uilleam in a dangerous position when the Bruce revival began in the same year, 1306. He found himself being attacked by Bruce in the south, and by Lachlan MacRuadridh (Lord of the Isle of Skye), Uilleam's nominal vassal, but Bruce's ally, in the west. When Bruce came north in 1308, Uilleam submitted, receiving his Mormaerdom back from Bruce, along with a pardon and the burgh of Dingwall. This bribe and the realities of power kept Uilleam in the Bruce camp.

    Uilleam was chief of the Clan Ross who fought on the side of the Bruce against the English at the Battle of Bannockburn. Uilleam was a signatory of the Declaration of Arbroath.

    Uilleam had six children, one of whom, Aodh, Earl of Ross, succeeded him when he died in 1323.

    William's wife Euphemia was previously known only as 'a lady named Euphemia, who warmly supported the English party' [Scots Peerage VII:234]. She has been identified as Euphemia de Berkeley, or Barclay, daughter of Sir Hugh de Berkeley, Justiciar of Lothian (1258–1276, d. bef 28 August 1296).3

Family: Euphemia de Berkeley b. c 1275

  • Last Edited: 21 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107897
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4668
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uilleam_II,_Earl_of_Ross.

Euphemia de Berkeley1

F, #7465, b. circa 1275

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William II de Ross 3rd Earl of Ross b. c 1255, d. 28 Jan 1323

  • Last Edited: 21 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10790.htm#i107897
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p20812.htm#i208118

William I de Ross 2nd Earl of Ross1

M, #7466, b. before 1232, d. May 1274

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: William I de Ross 2nd Earl of Ross was born before 1232 in Scotland.1,3
  • Marriage*: He married Joan Comyn, daughter of William Comyn Earl of Buchan and Sarah Fitz hugh, circa 1255 in Scotland.1
  • Death*: William I de Ross 2nd Earl of Ross died in May 1274 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Uilleam I of Ross was the first successor of Ferchar mac an tSagairt, as Mormaer of Ross, with his comital dates traditionally given as 1251–1274.

    Uilleam appears as early as 1232, witnessing a charter as the son of Ferchar. He was definitely Mormaer by 1258, but the traditional date is 1251. Uilleam played a pioneering role in the Scottish reconquest of the Hebrides, which had been under Norwegian control. Indeed, in many ways, he may be regarded as the instigator of Scottish aggression. Hákonar saga Hákonarsonar tells us that in Norway:
    "In the previous summer [i.e. that of 1262], letters came east from the Hebrides ... and they brought forward much about the dispeace that the Earl of Ross ... and other Scots, had made in the Hebrides, when they went out to Skye, and burned towns and churches, and slew very many men and women ... They said that the Scottish king intended to lay under himself all the Hebrides."

    Uilleam's attacks on Norwegian possessions earned him the ire of King Håkon IV, who planned an expedition against him. However, Uilleam escaped this expedition. He was probably rewarded with Skye and Lewis after the Scottish reconquest of the Hebrides, a reward secured when the conquests were ratified by the Treaty of Perth in 1266.

    He married Johanna Comyn, the daughter of William Comyn, jure uxoris Earl of Buchan, by whom he fathered his successor Uilleam. He died, probably in 1274.3

Family: Joan Comyn b. b 1198

  • Last Edited: 7 Mar 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4668
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4670
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uilleam_I,_Earl_of_Ross.

Joan Comyn1

F, #7467, b. before 1198

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: William I de Ross 2nd Earl of Ross b. b 1232, d. May 1274

  • Last Edited: 16 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4668
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p468.htm#i4671
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.

Ferquard Mac Taggart 1st Earl of Ross1

M, #7468, d. circa January 1251

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ferquard Mac Taggart 1st Earl of Ross was born in Scotland.1
  • Name Variation: Ferquard Mac Taggart 1st Earl of Ross was also known as Fearchar mac in tSagait.2
  • Death*: He died circa January 1251 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Fearchar of Ross or Ferchar mac in tSagairt (Fearchar mac an t-sagairt, often anglicized as Farquhar MacTaggart), was the first Mormaer or Earl of Ross (1223–1251) we know of from the thirteenth century, whose career brought Ross into the fold of the Scottish kings for the first time, and who is remembered as the founder of the Earldom of Ross.

    Origins

    The traditional story is that Fearchar was part of the ancient family Ó Beólláin of the Gaelic Cenél Eoghain that were co-arbs (hereditary abbots) of St. Maelrubha at Applecross in Ross-shire. This idea goes back to the work of the great William F. Skene, and indeed, even before him, with William Reeves, whom Skene cited. The historian Alexander Grant has recently challenged this theory, arguing that the evidence for this origin is far too thin to contradict the intuitive and well attested idea that he came from Easter Ross. Grant takes up the idea instead that mac an t-Sacairt (= Son of the Priest') probably refers to a background as keeper of the shrine to St Duthac, at Tain, Scotland.

    Career

    Scholarly work on Fearchar has led to the conclusion that Fearchar was a native nobleman who benefitted by upholding the interests of the King of Scots. Fearchar emerges from nothingness in 1215, as the local warlord who crushed a large-scale revolt against the Scottish king, Alexander II. The Chronicle of Melrose reported that :

    "Machentagar attacked them and mightily overthrew the king's enemies; and he cut off their heads and presented them as gifts to the new king ... And because of this, the lord king appointed him a new knight."
    Fearchar's ability to defeat the proven might of the Meic Uilleim and MacHeths together suggests that Fearchar could command large military resources, and as McDonald points out, this can hardly be entirely explained by his background as a hereditary priest from Tain. However, the Scottish kings themselves were hardly without authority in Ross, and their position could command social power even in this distant land, something proved by the MacWilliams, whose authority depended on their descent from a Scottish king. Fearchar's power then is not so mysterious.

    Promotion to Mormaer

    It is possible that Fearchar was made Mormaer when the grateful King Alexander II visited Inverness in 1221. Macdonald, however, gives some reasons why this might be a little early; around 1226 is a more likely date, but he was almost certainly Mormaer by 1230, and definitely by 1232, the year in which Fearchar's initial (as the father of his son Uilleam) appears in a charter, with the style Comes de Ross (i.e. Mormaer of Ross). Fearchar's initial and comital style also appear in a charter granting some lands to Walter de Moravia, a charter dating somewhere between 1224 and 1231.

    So did Fearchar appear from nowhere as a "novus homo"? The facts are that we do not know what happened to the Mormaerdom of Ross after the death, in 1168, of the last known Mormaer, Malcolm MacHeth. We might compare Ross with other Mormaerdoms, such as Lennox and Carrick, in which these apparently new Mormaerdoms were merely de iure royal grants to native lords who already possessed kinship leadership and de facto status as provincial rulers. In this view, conferring this style was simply an act of harnessing organic Gaelic power structures to the political, terminological and ideological framework of the regnum Scottorum.

    Fearchar & Scotland

    In 1235, it is reported that Fearchar was active in Galloway. The Revolt of Gille Ruadh in Galloway in 1234/5 required a large-scale levying by the Scottish king. King Alexander invaded Galloway, and Gille Ruadh ambushed the royal army, almost bringing it to destruction. However the Scottish King was saved by Fearchar, who appeared to the rescue with the Men of Ross.

    The defeat of the rebellious Galwegians by another peripheral Gaelic lord in the service of the Scottish King had been paralled in 1187, when Lochlann, Lord of Galloway defeated the rebellious Domnall mac Uilleim, claimant of the Scottish throne, at the Battle of Mam Garvia, somewhere near Dingwall. In fact, one historian has linked the two events as revenge.

    Fearchar was also recorded as being present at the negotiations which led to the Treaty of York, signed in 1237.

    Marriages & Family

    We know that Fearchar married one of his daughters, called Euphemia, to Walter de Moravia, a magnate who ruled Duffus. Walter's family were of Flemish origin, and had been planted in Moray by the Scottish crown as agents of royal authority, but were steadily building an independent power-base. Christina, another of Fearchar's daughters, was married to Amlaibh, the King of Mann and the Isles. If we are to use the chronology of the Chronicles of Mann, this happened sometime before 1223, but after 1188. Such a move is not surprising, as the Manx king ruled over the isle of Skye. This reminds us that Fearchar was not merely a slavish Scottish magnate with narrow local aspirations, but an ambitious Gaelic warlord with greater regional goals in the Norse-Gaelic world of the Irish Sea, the world of Alan, Lord of Galloway and the Manx kings.

    Church Patronage

    Fearchar's wider connections are further illustrated by his religious patronage. In the 1220s he granted the Premonstratensian Order (perhaps the most modern one about) of Whithorn in Galloway a new monastery at Mid Fearn in Ross, moving it a decade later to New Fearn. They brought with them some relics of St Ninian too, which is why to this day Fearn Abbey is associated with that saint. Such a move was hardly surprising, since all aspiring magnates needed their own monastery.

    Death

    We simply do not know the precise year in which Fearchar died. The traditional date, 1251, is based on the date given in the spurious Ane Breve Cronicle of the Erllis of Ross. The latter gives his birth place as Tain. Despite the unreliability of this source and date, he was certainly dead by the 1250s, when his son appears as Mormaer in his own right.4

Family:

  • Last Edited: 23 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4670
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uilleam_I,_Earl_of_Ross
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fearchar,_Earl_of_Ross.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p467.htm#i4672
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fearchar,_Earl_of_Ross.

Richard de Burgh 2nd Earl of Ulster1

M, #7469, b. circa 1259, d. 29 July 1326

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Richard de Burgh 2nd Earl of Ulster was born circa 1259 in Ulster, Ireland.3
  • Marriage*: He married Margaret de Burgh before 27 February 1280.3
  • Death*: Richard de Burgh 2nd Earl of Ulster died on 29 July 1326.2
  • Biography*: Burgh, Richard de, second Earl of Ulster and fourth Earl of Connaught 1259?-1326, was the eldest son of Walter de Burgh [qv.], first earl of Ulster, by his wife Avelina, sister of Richard FitzJohn, baron of the Isles of Thomond (Cal. Genealog. ii. 540). He succeeded to his father in 1271, but, being at that time a minor, was brought over to the king at Woodstock before the end of 1274, while his lands were entrusted to the custody of William Fitzwarenne in 1 Edward I (Sweetman, ii. 941, 1077, 1520, 1629). It may be inferred that he came of age about 1280; for though he had not taken seisin of his Ulster estates by 4 Nov. 1279, he had already been at open war with his former guardian before July 1282. Hence it is probable that he was born in 1259 (ib. 1601, 1918, with which cf. 1629). He had married before the end of February 1281 (ib. 1794), Margaret, said to be a daughter of John de Burgh, baron of Lanville, and great-grandson of Hubert de Burgh.

    De Burgh was constantly embroiled with the native Irish kings, especially of Connaught, his own lordship. Thus in 1286, when he makes his first great appearance in Irish history, he deposed Brian O'Neill from the supreme sovereignty of the natives of Ireland, and conferred the office on Niall Culanach O'Neill. Five years later he had to restore Niall, who had been in the meanwhile driven out by his rival, whom the earl in the course of a few months expelled from the country (Annals of Loch Cé sub annis). On Niall's death he placed another nominee of his own on the throne (ib.) In Connaught he played a similar part. In 1286 he burst into the province, plundering monasteries and churches, and receiving hostages everywhere, and before the year was out used the army of Connaught to reduce the septs of Cenet Eogtain and Cenel-Connaill. In 1292 he attacked Magnus O'Conor, king of Connaught, the representative of that branch of the house of the last great Irish king before the conquest, which his ancestor, William de Burgh, had driven from the throne, and forced him to do submission at his castle of Milic. In the same manner De Burgh and his brothers William and Theobald are found supporting the claims of Aedh O'Conor, the descendant of their great-grandfather's nominee, Cathal Crobdherg (1296). Many years later (1309-10) the De Burghs were instrumental in securing the accession of Aedh's son, Felim O'Conor, who, however, did not scruple in the Scotch invasion of 1315 to negotiate with Edward Bruce, till the success of his rival, Roderic O'Conor, forced him to supplicate the earl's assistance. The Irish chronicles mention by name three castles that were built by De Burgh, viz. Ballimote in co. Sligo (1300), Greencastle in Galway (1305), and Sligo Castle (1310). In 1316 Felim O'Conor destroyed Milic Castle, the great Connaught fortress that had been founded in the early days of the English conquest (1203) by William de Burgh (Annals of Loch Cé).

    De Burgh was summoned to serve against the king of France in 1294, and again in 1297, on the understanding that he should attend the king in person (Sweetman, iv. 396, 399, 452). All through the latter years of Edward I's reign, and the earlier years of Edward II, till 1322, he received summons regularly for the Scotch expeditions (Parl. Writs, i. passim). Thus he led more than sixteen hundred men from Ireland for the Balliol campaign of 1296; and at the second conquest of 1304 it was he who received (February) the submission of the Scotch governor, John Comyn (Hist. Doc. of Scotland, ii. 124; Excheq. Rolls of Scotland, No. 1451; Palgrave, i. 282). Before setting out on this expedition he is said to have made thirty-three knights in Dublin Castle (Bodley MS. Laud 526, ap. Gilbert, ii. 321). In these campaigns he spent his money so lavishly on the king's behalf, that in 1308 more than 2,000l. was still owing to him by the crown, out of an original debt of 4,000l. (Irish Close Rolls, 7 b).
    A great part of De Burgh's life was occupied with his hereditary feud with the Geraldines. In 1294 this feud reached a climax, when Lord John FitzThomas of Kildare suddenly made the Earl of Ulster a prisoner, and detained him in his castle from 6 Dec. to 12 March, when he was released by order of a parliament at Kilkenny. Edward declared that he would decide between them (October 1295), and summoned both nobles to attend him abroad (May 1297), their dispute being for the time postponed. In the interim the earl took the matter into his own hands, and the quarrel was not settled till 1302 (30 Edward I), when John FitzThomas was sentenced to forfeit 120 librates in Connaught (Sweetman, iv. 268, 399, 514; Gilbert, Chartularies, ii. 323; Book of Howth, 53). Ten years later (1312) the two families were still further reconciled by the marriage of Thomas, the son and heir of Lord John FitzThomas, with a daughter of De Burgh; and of another daughter, Catherine, with Maurice FitzThomas of Desmond (Book of Howth, 129, 133, 363). In 1311 the earl seems to have been at war in Thomond with Thomas de Clare, who in this year took William de Burgh a prisoner (ib. 128, with which cf. Fifteenth Century Chron. and Loch Cé sub ann.) About the same time, according to Mr. Gilbert, he attempted to dislodge the De Verduns and De Mortimers from Meath (Viceroys, 133).

    When Edward Bruce invaded Ireland in May 1315, and having gained possession of Ulster was proclaimed king, De Burgh raised an army to oppose him, and followed his retreat towards the Bann. When Felim O'Conor, his ally, began to waver, he fell back into Connaught with the loss of his brother William, who was taken prisoner by the Scotch (10 Sept.), but released in the course of the next year. In July 1316 the earl and the other Irish lords took an oath to defend their country; but notwithstanding this, on the approach of Bruce towards Dublin, he was apprehended by the mayor and confined in the castle (February 1317), while two ambassadors were despatched to Edward II to consult as to his fate. This imprisonment was probably due to a fear lest he should prove only half loyal in the contest that was about to ensue with his son-in-law Robert Bruce. He was released by Ascension day, but not before the son of his old rival, Thomas FitzJohn, had led the Ultonians against the Scots (Fourteenth Cent. Chron. and Fifteenth Cent. Chron., ap. Gilbert's Chartularies; Annals of Loch Cé).

    De Burgh was the most powerful of the English nobles in Ireland, in which country, according to Mr. Gilbert, his name preceded that of the viceroy in the royal writs. Besides the lordship of Connaught and the earldom of Ulster he inherited estates in Munster by right of his mother, Avelina, one of the heiresses of Richard FitzJohn (Sweetman, iv. 638). Earlier in his life he appears to have held the Isle of Man, which, however, he had restored to the king by 1290 (Hist. Doc. of Scotl. i. 156). Towards the close of his career he was occasionally summoned to attend the English parliaments, as, for example, those of Westminster in Lent 1308, and Lincoln in 1318. He was appointed lieutenant of Ireland 15 June 1308, but his commission was next day cancelled in favour of Piers Gaveston. Early in 1310 he was present at the great Kilkenny parliament for the pacification of the Irish barons. Sixteen years later, after attending a parliament at the same place, he gave a farewell banquet, and retired to the monastery of Athassil, near Cashel, where he died almost immediately, before Midsummer day 1326 (Fourteenth and Fifteenth Cent. Chron; cf. Irish Rolls, 35, &c.)

    Richard de Burgh was the father of a large family. His eldest son, Walter, died in 1304 (Loch Cé), and the great De Burgh estates devolved on the issue of a younger son, John (d. 1313), who in 1308 married Elizabeth, sister of Gilbert de Clare, last earl of Gloucester (Cal. Pat. Rolls, 81 b, 99 b; Ann. Lond. et Paul. i. 156, 264). Another son, Thomas, died in 1316 (Fourteenth Cent. Chron.) To these may be added Edmund (Irish Rolls, 40), and, according to Lodge, William. Of his daughters, one, Elizabeth by name, married Robert Bruce, then earl of Carrick (Fifteenth Cent. Chron., cf. sub an. 1302); a second, Matilda, married Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester (Escheat Rolls, i. 271); and a third, Joan, married first Lord Thomas FitzJohn, and secondly Sir John d'Arcy, the justiciar (Fifteenth Cent. Chron. Book of Howth, 155). Katherine de Burgh, a fourth daughter, married Lord Maurice FitzThomas (ib; cf., however, Lodge, i., who adds Margaret and Eleanor).4,5
  • Last Edited: 17 Nov 2014

Margaret de Burgh1

F, #7470

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Richard de Burgh 2nd Earl of Ulster b. c 1259, d. 29 Jul 1326

  • Last Edited: 7 Oct 2012