Alasdair (?)

M, #3361, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Alasdair was born circa 1225 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: The MacDonalds in Clan Donald give Alastair Mor's mother as a daughter of Walter the Steward while Williams in The Lords of the Isles says she was a daughter of her father's uncle, Gilles mac Somerled.

    He was the founder of the MacAlisdairs of Loup.1,2
  • Last Edited: 24 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S577] Norman H. MacDonald, The Clan Ranald of Knoydart & Glengarry.

Murchad (?)

M, #3362, b. circa 1225

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Murchad was born circa 1225 in Scotland.1
  • Last Edited: 24 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Alexander Og MacDonald Lord of Islay1,2

M, #3363, b. circa 1260, d. 1299

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Alexander Og MacDonald Lord of Islay was also known as Alasdair MacDonald of Islay.
  • Birth*: Alexander was born circa 1260 in Scotland.3,4,5
  • Marriage*: He married Juliana MacDougall of Lorne circa 1280 in Scotland.3,4,5
  • Death*: Alexander Og MacDonald Lord of Islay died in 1299 in Scotland.5
  • Biography*: Alexander Og MacDonald (died 1299), also known as Alexander of the Isles, was a 13th-century Hebridean magnate. With the death of his father in about 1293, MacDonald succeeded as Lord of Islay, and the chiefship of the MacDonalds. During his tenure as chief, the lands of his family fell prey to the powerful Alexander MacDougall, Lord of Argyll, the chief of the MacDougalls. MacDonald and his younger brother entered into the service of Edward I, King of England, and made several appeals to the English king for aid against MacDougall. In fact, MacDonald may well have been married to a sister or daughter of MacDougall, and MacDonald and his wife fought a legal dispute against MacDougall over the island of Lismore. Although he is sometimes said to have lived into the 14th century, MacDonald may well have been slain in battle against MacDougall in 1299, and appears to have been succeeded by his younger brother, Angus Og MacDonald. MacDonald had six sons, and his descendants were noted gallowglass-warriors in Ireland. MacDonald is one of the earliest MacDonalds to bear a heraldic device.

    Family and background
    The eldest son of Angus Mor MacDonald, Lord of Islay (d. c.1293), Alexander Og MacDonald was probably born during the reign of, and named after, Alexander III, King of Scots (d. 1286). His younger brother was Angus Og MacDonald. Alexander Og MacDonald's byname (Og) was probably used to differentiate him from his elder namesake-uncle, Alexander Mor MacDonald. During Alexander III's reign, the MacDonalds were one of the most powerful kindreds on the western seaboard of Scotland. The MacDonalds (descended from Donald, son of Ranald, son of Somerled) were related to the MacRauris (descended from Ruari, son of Ranald, son of Somerled), and the extremely powerful MacDougalls (descended from Dugald, son of Somerled).

    In the mid-13th century, about the time of Alexander Og MacDonald's birth, the islands on the western seaboard of Scotland were claimed by the Kingdom of Norway. After repeated attempts by the Scots kings to purchase the islands, Scottish aggression into the region forced Hakon Hakonarson, King of Norway into action, who launched a massive military campaign to reassert Norwegian dominance. Although Hakon's forces gained in strength, as they sailed through the Hebrides, he received only lukewarm support from his vassals. After an inclusive series of actions, on the Scottish mainland at Largs, Hakon eventually turned for home, having accomplished little. Not long after Hakon's departure and death, Alexander III launched a punitive expedition into the Hebrides, and forced the submission of many of the leading magnates who had supported the Norwegian cause. MacDonald's father was thus forced to hand him over as a hostage, to secure the good behaviour of the MacDonalds to the Scottish realm. The provision of a nursemaid in the surviving documentary evidence suggests that MacDonald was only a young child at the time. In 1266, through the Treaty of Perth, Alexander III finally purchased the islands from Magnus Hakonarson, King of Norway, and thus the island-territories of the MacDonalds (and their kinsmen) fell within the Kingdom of Scots.

    The Turnberry Band
    With the death of Alexander III in March 1286, who left only a pregnant widow and an infant Norwegian-granddaughter, the succession to the Scottish throne was uncertain. Although a panel of six guardians was appointed to govern the realm, factions soon solidified with competing claims to the throne. In September 1286, one such claimant, Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale (d. 1295) gathered his associates at the seat of his son, Turnberry Castle, and concluded a bond of alliance, the so-called Turnberry Band. Due to the vagness of the agreement, the motivation behind the signatories is unknown for certain. One interpretation of the alliance is that Bruce was rallying his supporters in preparation for his rise soon afterwards when, Alexander III's widow miscarried in November, and Bruce's forces rose in rebellion and took several castles in the south-west of Scotland, before order was finally restored by the guardians.

    Many of the distinguished signatories of the Turnberry Band were neighbours of Bruce, and two such signatory-neighbours were Alexander Og MacDonald and his father. The document stipulated that all signatories should provide aid for two particular English magnates in Ireland: Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster (d. 1326), and Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond (d. 1287). Of the signatories, the MacDonalds had the closest links to Ireland. Since these connections were closest with kindreds hostile to the Earl of Ulster, the bond may have been used as an instrument to keep the MacDonalds from supporting the enemies of the Anglo-Irish.

    Edward of England and Alexander of Argyll
    When Alexander III's granddaughter died on her journey to Scotland in 1290, the leading claimants to the Scottish throne were Bruce and John Balliol (d. 1314). In 1291, Edward I, King of England, gained consent from the leading Scottish magnates to resolve the dispute through a judicial proceeding. In November 1292, the judgement went in favour of Balliol, who was thus duly enthroned King of Scots. Unfortunately for John, his ambitious English counterpart systematically undermined his authority, and Edward heard appeals on judgements made in Scotland.

    In 1293, at his first parliament, John created three sheriffdoms: Skye, under the authority of William, Earl of Ross; Kintyre, under the authority of James Stewart; and Lorn, under the authority of Alexander MacDougall, Lord of Argyll (d. 1310). The expansive territory of the MacDonalds spanned the regions under the authority of both Stewart and MacDougall. In about 1293, after his father's death, Alexnader Og MacDonald appears to have succeeded to the chiefship of the family. Along with his wife, Juliana, MacDonald is known to have been involved in a legal dispute with his powerful MacDougall namesake. The first indication of such a dispute occurs in 1292, when MacDonald and MacDougall took their grievances over certain unknown lands to John. The outcome of this dispute is unknown, but MacDonald later appealed his case to King Edward, stating that John had occupied part of Lismore and refused to hand it over to him and his wife. Juliana is sometimes claimed to have been either a sister or daughter of MacDougall, and it has been thought possible that the contested lands formed part of her dowry. However, other than her contested-claim on the island, there is little hard evidence to corroborate a familial-link to the MacDougalls.

    In 1296, after John ratified a military treaty with France, and refused to hand over Scottish castles to Edward's control, the English marched north and crushed the Scots at Dunbar, after which Edward's forces proceeded forward virtually unopposed. Scotland thus fell under Edward's control. Although MacDougall, like most Scots magnates, rendered homage to Edward in 1296, surviving evidence reveals that he was out of the English king's favour between the years 1296 and 1301. The reasons for MacDougall's fall from favour could well be related to his feuding with MacDonald. Surviving sources show that MacDonald was acting as Edward's bailiff as early as April 1296. In this capacity, MacDonald was tasked to seize Kintyre, which had been escheated by John, and to hand the lands over to a certain Malcolm "le fiz Lengleys" ("son of the Englishman"). In a letter to King Edward in the summer of 1296, MacDonald queried the English king for clarification of his orders. He stated that he had already taken control of Kintyre, and was about to seize Stewart's castle, which is thought to be Dunaverty Castle. Unfortunately for scholars, Edward's reply is not known, but in September he is known to have awarded Alexander £100 worth of lands for "good service".

    In September 1296, King Edward commissioned Alexander Stewart, Earl of Menteith, to take MacDougall into custody. In May of the following year, MacDougall was released from imprisonment. By summer, MacDonald sent two letters to Edward, complaining that MacDougall and his associates were wreaking havoc throughout the region. In his first letter, after reporting that MacDougall had wasted his lands, the chief of the MacDonalds begged Edward to order the lords of Argyll and Ross to help him in keeping peace in the region. In the second letter, he reported the ongoing destruction committed by MacDougall, MacDougall's son Duncan, and MacDougall's brother-in-law John Comyn, Lord of Badenoch (d. 1303); he also complained that one of the king's escaped enemies, Lachlan MacRuari, had been aided by MacDougall, who had outfitted MacRuari with galleys; MacDonald concluded this letter by noting that the money which had been promised to him for his services had not yet been received.

    Confusion: death and the MacDonald chiefship
    In about 1299, the Annals of Connacht, the Annals of Loch Cé, the Annals of the Four Masters, and the Annals of Ulster indicate that a certain "Alexander MacDonald" was slain in a particularly bloody battle by MacDougall. For example, the Annals of Ulster describe the slain man as "the person who was best for hospitality and excellence that was in Ireland and in Scotland", and state that he fell "with a countless number of his own people that were slaughtered around him". Although this man is generally thought to have been Alexander Og MacDonald, another view is that man referred to was his elderly namesake-uncle Alexander Mor MacDonald. If Alexander Og MacDonald did indeed fall in battle against his adversary MacDougall in 1299, this final clash was probably the bloody culmination of their drawn-out legal dispute of 1292. In fact, MacDonald's demise at the hands of MacDougall is probably connected to the combined military actions of Hugh Bisset, John MacSween, and Angus Og MacDonald, recorded against the ever-dangerous Lord of Argyll not long afterwards. With MacDonald's death, surviving sources indicate that the leadership of the family fell to his younger brother, Angus Og MacDonald. Thus in a letter to King Edward I in 1301, Angus Og MacDonald has the designation "de Yle" ("of Islay"), and conducted negotiations with the English king on his kindred's behalf.

    On the basis of the 14th century chronicler John of Fordun (d. in or after 1363), who wrote of the capture of a "Donald of the Isles", it has sometimes been stated that Alexander Og MacDonald lived into the 14th century, and that he was captured in 1308 by Edward Bruce, Earl of Carrick (d. 1318). However, Fordun's version of these particular events is confused, and there is no definitive evidence to support the claim that MacDonald lived into the 14th century. Confusingly, there is a record of a royal charter, generally thought to date from the reign of Robert I, King of Scots (d. 1329), to a certain "Alexander younger Lord of the Isles". It is possible that this individual was either a nephew, or an otherwise unknown son and successor of Angus Og MacDonald. Another possibility is that this was Alexander Og MacDonald himself—if this is the case, and the charter was indeed granted by Robert I, then MacDonald could not have perished in 1299.

    The Annals of Inisfallen appear to indicate that an "Alexander MacDonald" was killed in the same year as Edward Bruce, who fell at the battle of Battle of Faughart in 1318. Various Irish sources, such as the Annals of Clonmacnoise, the Annals of Loch Cé, and the Annals of Ulster, state that alongside Bruce fell "MacRuari, King of the Hebrides" and "MacDonald, King of Argyll". The identity of the latter is uncertain, although the title "King of Argyll" may be evidence that he was chief of the MacDonalds at this time. It is possible that the accounts of "Alexander M" and "MacDonald, King of Argyll" could refer to the same man: perhaps the son/successor of Angus Og MacDonald (possibly recorded in Robert I's charter), or else Alexander Og MacDonald himself (which would make him the man recorded in the said charter). Another possibility is that the "Alexander M" and "MacDonald, King of Argyll" could refer to different men, the latter being Angus Og MacDonald.

    The identity of Donald MacDonald, significantly styled "of Islay" in several surviving sources, is uncertain. He may have been an otherwise unknown son of Angus Mor MacDonald, or an otherwise unknown son of Alexander Og MacDonald, or else the son of Alexander Mor MacDonald. Regardless of whether Alexander Og MacDonald fell in the 14th century or not, on the basis of the 14th century continuation of the chronicles of Nicholas Trevet, Donald MacDonald was among the slain at Faughart.

    Legacy
    Alexander Og MacDonald had six sons. By at least 1340, his descendants became noted gallowglass in Ireland.

    MacDonald and his father are the first of their family to bear heraldic devices. Alexander's seal, which names him "S'ALEXANDRI DE ISLE", contains a lymphad with two men therein.3,6,5

Family: Juliana MacDougall of Lorne b. c 1230

  • Last Edited: 7 Nov 2016

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Og_MacDonald,_Lord_of_Islay.
  2. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 39.
  3. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  4. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Og_MacDonald,_Lord_of_Islay#Family_and_background.
  6. [S577] Norman H. MacDonald, The Clan Ranald of Knoydart & Glengarry.

John Sprangach MacDonald

M, #3364, b. circa 1250, d. circa 1340

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John was born circa 1250 in Scotland.1,2
  • Death*: John died circa 1340 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: This John was the founder the MacIains of Ardnamurchan.1
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.

Duncan MacDougall 2nd of Dunollie and of Lorn1

M, #3365, b. circa 1225, d. 1248

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duncan MacDougall 2nd of Dunollie and of Lorn was born circa 1225 in Dunollie, Argyllshire, Scotland.1
  • Death*: He died in 1248 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: Donnchadh of Argyll or Donnchadh mac Dubhghaill (Anglicized: "Duncan, son of Dougall") was a late 12th and early 13th century Scottish noble. He was the son of Dubhghall mac Somhairle, son of Somhairle mac Gille Bhrighde. He is the first of the MacDougall lords of Argyll to take the title de Argadia, and can be regarded as the founder of the successful MacDougall lordship of Argyll. He was also a prominent builder, notable for his construction of Ardchattan Priory and Dunstaffnage Castle.

    Biography
    First appearance
    Born at an unknown date probably somewhere in the mid 12th century, Donnchadh appears in the records for the first time in 1175, appearing along with his father and brother Amhlaibh in the Durham Liber Vitae, making a pilgrimage to St Cuthbert.

    Construction of Lordship of Argyll-Lorne
    During Donnchadh's time the great feuds that had been causing war on the western seaboard of Scotland since Somhairle mac Gille Bhrighde were coming to an end. Ruaídhrí mac Raghnaill, son of Raghnall mac Somhairle, King of the Isles and Lord of Argyll, was at peace with Ragnall mac Gofraid, King of Mann, and had become friendly with Ailean mac Lachlainn, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland. In this context, King Alexander II of Scotland led expeditions into Argyll in 1221 and 1222, expeditions which led to Donnchadh being recognised or appointed to the Lordship of Lorne. Donnchadh remained a strong supporter of the Scottish crown against the interests of Ruaídhrí mac Raghnaill and Amhlaibh Dubh.

    These expeditions into Argyll appear to have given Donnchadh domination of the kindreds of all Argyll in place of Ruaídhrí. Around 1225, Donnchadh de Argadia ("of Argyll") appeared in a charter of Maol Domhnaich, Earl of Lennox (d. 1250) made to Paisley Abbey; this appearance is notable because it is the first attestation of the locative family name "of Argyll", the name that Donnchadh and his descendants would use to identify themselves among the higher nobility of Scotland.

    In 1229, the Manx king Raghnall mac Gofraidh was killed. Fear of Galwegian or Scottish royal intervention led the Manxmen to appeal to the Norwegian crown. The Norwegian expedition, led by the Islesman "Uspak", probably Donnchadh's brother, ravished Kintyre and in 1230 attacked the Stewart controlled Isle of Bute. This expedition was unsuccessful and led to Uspak's death. Donnchadh remained firmly in possession of his Argyll lordship.

    Death
    It is likely that soon after these events his son Eóghan began to play a more important role, particularly because Donnchadh was growing old. Donnchadh's death can not be placed with absolute certainty, but it is possible that Donnchadh is the "Mac Somhairle" who died at Ballyshannon in 1247, mentioned in the Annals of Loch Cé:
    Mac Somhairle, king of Airer-Gaeidhel, and the nobles of the Cenel-Conaill besides, were slain.

    This is what McDonald thinks, but other historians such as Seán Duffy have taken it to refer to Domhnall mac Raghnaill, the progenitor of Clan Donald. Alex Woolf argued that Donnchadh was probably too old at this stage to have been fighting in Ireland, and suggests that the probable identity of this man was Ruaídhrí mac Raghnaill. Sellar also believes that Donnchadh would have been too old, and also suggests identifying this man with Ruaídhrí mac Raghnaill. Donnchadh appeared in Scottish sources in 1237, and again, for the last time, in 1244, as one of the magnates whose names were attached to a letter from Alexander II to the Pope. His son Eóghan appears to have been fully in charge of the lordship by 1249, probably indicating that Donnchadh was dead by this point.

    Legacy
    Donnchadh, like other Scottish magnates of the time such as Uilleam, Earl of Mar, and Fearchar, Earl of Ross, was a prominent religious patron and castle builder. Around 1230, he founded a house for Valliscaulian monks at Loch Etive; this was Ardchattan Priory. The Valliscaulians were a relatively new religious order fashionable in the reign of Alexander II, with other foundations around the same time at Beauly Priory and Pluscarden Abbey. Donnchadh is remembered for his secular buildings too. It was Donnchadh who constructed Dunstaffnage Castle, the site which became the main seat of the MacDougall lords of Argyll. Donnchadh may have been responsible for the huge hallhouse castle at Aros in Mull.

    Donnchadh had several children. The most important of these was his son Eóghan of Argyll, who succeeded to his lordship. A daughter called Gill or Egidia' allegedly married Brian mac Néill Ru
    iad Ó Néill, King of Tír Eógain.3
  • Last Edited: 29 Dec 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51067.htm#i510667
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51067.htm#i510666
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donnchadh_of_Argyll
  4. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Dugall Scrag MacDougall

M, #3366, b. circa 1160

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Dugall was born circa 1160 in Scotland.1
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Ospak Hakon MacDougall

M, #3367, b. circa 1160

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ospak was born circa 1160 in Scotland.1
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Ewen de Lorne MacDougall King of the Isles1

M, #3368, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name-Gaelic: Ewen de Lorne MacDougall King of the Isles was also known in Gaelic as Eóghan MacDubhghaill.
  • Birth*: Ewen was born circa 1200 in Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: He married (daughter) Comyn circa 1230 in Scotland.3
  • Biography*: Eóghan MacDubhghaill (Anglicized: Ewan MacDougall, Ewan of Argyll or Ewan of Lorne) was a 13th-century Scottish nobleman and warrior who was styled "King of the Isles", "Lord of Argyll". He was the son of Donnchadh, son of Dubhghall, son of Somhairle mac Gille Brighde.

    According to Scandinavian sources, after the death of Harald Olafsson in 1248, King Haakon IV of Norway appointed Eóghan as King of the Isles, though within a year that title went to Dubhghall mac Ruaidhri.

    In response to Eóghan's assumption of this title perhaps, in 1249 King Alexander II of Scotland launched an expedition against Eóghan after the latter refused to renounce his homage to King Haakon IV of Norway. Alexander II fell ill and died on this expedition, but Eóghan seems to have been temporarily deprived of his Argyll possessions.

    In 1250, Eóghan tried to obtain rulership of the Isle of Man, but was expelled by the inhabitants. He then travelled to Norway, hoping for recognition as King of the Isles. This attempt was unsuccessful. By 1255, King Henry III of England had secured a deal for Eóghan whereby he regained Lorne and came into full Scottish allegiance.

    When Haakon campaigned against the Scots in 1263, Eóghan refused the Norwegian king service and remained a Scottish loyalist. After Haakon's defeat at the Battle of Largs, Eóghan regained formal recognition as ruler of the Isles. His last recorded appearance is in 1268.

    Eóghan's son Alexander followed him as Lord of Argyll. His daughter Mary married three times 1st Magnus Olafsson King of Mann, 2nd Maol Íosa II, Earl of Strathearn, 3rd Sir William FitzWarin.

    He may have been the Mac Somurli responsible for the death of Jordan de Exeter during a pirate raid in Connemara in 1258.1

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E%C3%B3ghan_of_Argyll
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51068.htm#i510679
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51068.htm#i510673

Juliana MacDougall of Lorne

F, #3369, b. circa 1230

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Alexander Og MacDonald Lord of Islay b. c 1260, d. 1299

  • Last Edited: 24 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S220] Rev. A. MacDonald & Rev. A. MacDonald, The Clan Donald.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Og_MacDonald,_Lord_of_Islay#Family_and_background.

Sir Alexander MacDougall 4th of Dunollie & of Lorn1

M, #3370, b. circa 1230

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name Variation: Sir Alexander MacDougall 4th of Dunollie & of Lorn was also known as Alexander de Ergadia MacDougall.
  • Birth*: Alexander was born circa 1230 in Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: He married (daughter) Comyn, daughter of John I Comyn Lord of Badenoch, circa 1260 in Scotland.4
  • Biography*: Alexander of Argyll, also known as Alexander of Lorne, and Alexander MacDougall (Scottish Gaelic: Alasdair MacDubhgaill; died 1310), was a Scottish magnate from the late 13th and early 14th century.

    Alexander was the son of Ewen MacDougall, Lord of Argyll. Although the details of Alexander's early life are largely unknown, he appears to have succeeded to his father's position as Lord of Argyll and Lorne and head of the MacDougall kindred after the latter's death in 1268. Alexander appears to have been named after King Alexander III of Scotland. Under the latter's authority, Alexander was involved in a Scottish invasion of the Isle of Man in 1275.

    In 1284 he joined with other Scottish noblemen who acknowledged Margaret of Norway as the heir of Alexander.

    Argyll
    As the succession crisis resulting from the unexpected deaths of Alexander III (1286) and then his designated successor Margaret (1290) developed, Argyll took a prominent part in the succession dispute. He was married to the sister of John II Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, key ally and kinsman of the Balliols. Alexander found himself as a firm Balliol supporter as the Balliol's vied against the Bruces to take the succession. He served as one of John de Balliol's auditors during the Great Cause, and after the latter's accession as King, Alexander was a key ally and helped King John establish his sheriffdoms in the west.

    The alliance between MacDougall and Balliol developed from and caused an alliance between MacDougall's main regional rival, Alexander Og MacDonald, and the Bruces. Alexander was captured during the Battle of Dunbar by English forces and was imprisoned at Berwick Castle until his release in 1297.

    After the deposition of Balliol in 1296, MacDougall opposed the power of his new overlord Edward I of England. The failure of Balliol's kingship also helped to fuel conflict between the two west Highland kindreds as part of the civil and international conflict known today as the First War of Scottish Independence; in 1299 MacDougall killed Alexander Og.

    MacDougall became reconciled with King Edward and in 1305 became a member of the King's Scottish council. The murder of Alexander's kinsman John III Comyn, Lord of Badenoch in 1306 by Robert de Brus, Earl of Carrick, hardened MacDougall's anti-Bruce position, and this became opposition to Robert's kingship as the latter proclaimed himself King of Scots at Scone later in the year. Through 1307 and into 1308 King Robert assaulted the MacDougall-Comyn position in the Western Highlands. After Alexander's seat, Dunstaffnage Castle, was captured by Bruce forces in 1308, Alexander entered the King's peace. Although Alexander attended the St Andrews parliament of 1309, by 1310 Alexander and his son had gone into England to join the service of King Edward II of England. Alexander died in that year, perhaps in English service in Ireland.

    Alexander's only known wife was a daughter of the John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch. He had many children, including:
    John of Argyll, his son and successor
    Donnchadh
    Christiana, m. Maol Mhuire Lamont
    Alexander Og's wife, Juliana, may have been a daughter of sister of Alexander. Another of his daughters, unknown by name, married Lachlan MacRuaraidh, son of Alan MacRuaraidh, Lord of Garmoran. He had several other sons.5

Family 1: (daughter) Comyn b. c 1230

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51068.htm#i510680
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p51068.htm#i510679
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_of_Argyll
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_I_Comyn,_Lord_of_Badenoch.
  5. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_of_Argyll

Duncan MacDougall

M, #3371, b. circa 1230

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Duncan was born circa 1230 in Scotland.1

Family:

  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Alan MacDougall

M, #3372, b. circa 1260

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Alan was born circa 1260 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Alan was the founder of Clan Dougall of Dunollie.1
  • Last Edited: 31 Mar 2014

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

John the Lame MacDougall 5th of Dunollie & of Lorne1

M, #3373, b. circa 1260, d. 1316

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: John was born circa 1260 in Scotland.2
  • Death*: He died in 1316 in Ospring, Kent, England.3
  • Biography*: Eóin or John of Argyll (Latin: Johannes de Ergadia) or John of Lorne, also known as John MacDougall (Scottish Gaelic: Eóin MacDubhgaill (med) or Iain MacDhùghaill), was a Scottish nobleman of the early 14th century. He is often known to today as John Bacach, "the Lame", but there is no authority for that as a contemporary or near-contemporary nickname.

    Biography
    The son of Alexander MacDougall (Alasdair MacDubhgall), Lord of Argyll, by a daughter of John I Comyn, Lord of Badenoch, John appears in the records in 1291 swearing fealty to Edward I of England. From his father's and mother's background, he inherited the pro-Baliol sympathies that determined his family's and his own activities during the Great Cause and the First War of Scottish Independence. As the Balliol stalwarts of the west, the Bruce heartland, the MacDougalls and Comyns eventually found themselves up against Bruce-backed MacDonalds, Campbells, the Menteiths, men of Lennox and the Stewarts, in addition to Bruce's own Carrick forces.

    After the deposition of King John de Balliol in 1296, John's father Alexander opposed the power of his new overlord Edward I. The failure of Balliol's kingship fuelled conflict between the MacDougalls and other west Highland kindreds. One of John's most famous actions in later Gaelic tradition was killing Cailean Mór (or "Sir Colin Campbell"). It is not clear what the exact source of conflict was at the time. Cailean, Bruce's second cousin, was "Ballie" of Loch Awe and Ardscotnish, a position he was granted either by King John Balliol or Edward I of England. Sometime after September 1296, Cailean was killed by John's forces at the "Red Ford" on the borders of Loch Awe and Lorne in a skirmish. In 1299, MacDougall forces caused the death of Alexander Og MacDonald, Lord of Islay.

    The MacDougall kindred gradually grew more co-operative with King Edward as their rivals grew less so. In 1305 both John and his father became members of the advisory council of Edward's lieutenant in Scotland, John of Brittany. The following year, Robert de Brus, Earl of Carrick, went into open revolt against the English crown, declaring himself King of Scots. The new King Robert met with an upset against pro-English forces at the Battle of Methven, and fled into the west. It was during this time in 1306 that Robert met John's MacDougall forces blocking their way at Tyndrum. At what became known as the Battle of Dail Righ ("King's field"), John defeated Bruce's forces.

    In the following year Edward rewarded MacDougall by appointing him sheriff of Argyll and Inchegall. However, as MacDougall informed Edward by letter in 1308, Robert's power was becoming increasingly difficult to live with, and the position of MacDougall's was becoming critical. After experiencing defeat at the Battle of Pass of Brander in 1308, the main MacDougall seat, Dunstaffnage Castle, was captured by Bruce forces. John fled into England with his father entering King Robert's peace. By 1310, John's father Alexander had joined him in England, both attending a royal council at Westminster. Despite losing his father in 1310, in the following years John remained in English service. He was put in charge of English fleets in 1311 and 1314, and in 1315 conquered the Isle of Man for the English crown. John began receiving a pension from Edward II of England in 1316. In this year he died at Ospring in Kent, while making a pilgrimage to Canterbury. He left the Galwegian "Dungal MacDowall" (Dungall MacDubhgall), a fellow political exile from Scotland, in charge of his will.

    John left several sons and daughters, though his wife or wives are not known. Among his offspring known by name are:
    Ewen (Eóghan)
    Alan (Ailean)
    Somhairle
    Alexander (Alasdair) Óg
    Mary (Maire)
    He had another daughter who married one Patrick Graham. John's son Eóghan returned to Scotland with Edward Balliol's unsuccessful attempt at the Scottish throne in the 1330s. The MacDougalls re-emerged in Argyll in unknown circumstances later in the century. John's grandson, through Ailean, known as John Gallda ("the Foreigner"), is on record from 1338. Later, John Gallda was styling himself "Lord of Argyll".[1] Eoin 'gallda's son and heir was Eoghan de Ergadia, Laird of Latharna.3
  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10925.htm#i109250
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  3. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Argyll

Ewen MacDougall 5th of Lorne & 7th of Dunollie1

M, #3374, b. circa 1290

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Ewen was born circa 1290 in Scotland.2

Family 1: Jonet Isaac

Family 2:

  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p2497.htm#i24962
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Janet MacDougall

F, #3375, b. circa 1350

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Janet was born circa 1350.1
  • Last Edited: 13 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Beathag Mac Somerled

F, #3377, b. circa 1140

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Name-Comm: Her common name was Beatrice.
  • Birth*: Beathag was born circa 1140 in Scotland.1
  • Biography*: Beathag was the first prioress of Iona.2
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S119] Nigel Tranter, Lord of the Isles.

son (?)

M, #3380, b. circa 1180, d. 1210

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aonghas_mac_Somhairle

son (?)

M, #3381, b. circa 1175, d. 1210

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Last Edited: 16 Jul 2015

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aonghas_mac_Somhairle

Walter Stewart 6th High Steward

M, #3385, b. 1292, d. 9 April 1327

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Walter was born in 1292 in Scotland.3,2
  • Marriage*: He married Alice Erskine, daughter of Sir John Erskine, before 1315 in Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: He married Marjorie Bruce Princess of Scotland in 1315 in Scotland.3,2
  • Marriage*: Walter Stewart 6th High Steward married Isabella Graham after 1315.2
  • Death*: Walter Stewart 6th High Steward died on 9 April 1327 in Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland by his spouse Gilles (or Egidia) de Burgh, daughter of Walter de Burgh, 1st Earl of Ulster.

    Walter fought on the Scottish side at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 commanding, with Douglas, the left wing of the Scots' Army. According to another version of events, he was the nominal leader of one of the four Scottish schiltrons, but because of his youth and inexperience, its effective leader was his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas. This is, however, disputed, as some claim that there were only three Scottish schiltrons at Bannockburn.

    Upon the liberation of Robert The Bruce's wife and daughter from their long captivity in England, the High Steward was sent to receive them at the Border and conduct them back to the Scottish Court.

    During The Bruce's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent much time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he got command of the town which, on 24 July 1319 was laid siege to by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to beat off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.
    Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).4

Family 1: Isabella Graham b. c 1295

Family 2: Alice Erskine b. c 1292

Family 3: Marjorie Bruce Princess of Scotland b. 1296, d. a 2 Mar 1316

  • Last Edited: 24 Feb 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10531.htm#i105308
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102096
  3. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Stewart,_6th_High_Steward_of_Scotland.
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10793.htm#i107926
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102097

Marjorie Bruce Princess of Scotland1

F, #3386, b. 1296, d. after 2 March 1316

Marjorie Bruce's sarcophagus-effigy at Paisley Abbey, where she was buried

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Marjorie was born in 1296 in Carrick, Scotland.2,3,4
  • Marriage*: She married Walter Stewart 6th High Steward in 1315 in Scotland.2,3
  • Death*: Marjorie Bruce Princess of Scotland died after 2 March 1316 in Gallowhill, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.4
  • Burial*: She was buried after 2 March 1316 in Paisley Abbey, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.4
  • Biography*: Marjorie Bruce or Marjorie de Brus (1296 – 2 March 1316) was the eldest daughter of Robert the Bruce, King of Scots by his first wife, Isabella of Mar, and the founder of the Stewart dynasty. Her marriage to Walter, High Steward of Scotland gave rise to the House of Stewart. Her son was the first Stewart monarch, King Robert II of Scotland. Her father remarried, after a certain period of time, Elizabeth de Burgh.

    Early life
    Her mother, Isabella, a nineteen-year-old noblewoman from the Clan Mar, died soon after giving birth to her. Her father was then the Earl of Carrick. Marjorie was named after her father's mother, Marjorie, Countess of Carrick.

    According to legend, her parents had been very much in love, and Robert the Bruce did not remarry until Marjorie was six years old. In 1302, a courtier named Elizabeth de Burgh became her stepmother.

    On 27 March 1306, her father was crowned King of Scots at Scone, Perthshire, and Marjorie, then nine years old, became a Princess of Scotland.

    Imprisonment (1306–1314)
    Three months after the coronation, in June, 1306, her father was defeated at the Battle of Methven. He sent his female relatives (his wife, two sisters and Marjorie) north with his supporter the Countess of Buchan, but by the end of June the band of Bruce women were captured and betrayed to the English by the Earl of Ross.

    As punishment, Edward I sent his hostages to different places in England. Princess Marjorie went to the convent at Watton; her aunt Christina Bruce was sent to another convent; Queen Elizabeth was placed under house arrest at a manor house in Yorkshire (because Edward I needed the support of her father, the powerful Earl of Ulster, her punishment was lighter than the others'); and Marjorie's aunt Mary Bruce and the Countess of Buchan were imprisoned in wooden cages, exposed to public view, Mary's cage at Roxburgh Castle and Countess Isabella's at Berwick Castle. For the next four years, Marjorie, Elizabeth, Christina, Mary and Isabella endured solitary confinement, with daily public humiliation for the latter two. A cage was built for Marjorie at the Tower of London, but Edward I reconsidered and instead sent her to the convent. Christopher Seton, Christina's husband, was executed.

    Edward I died on 7 July 1307. He was succeeded by his son, Edward II, who subsequently held Marjorie captive in a convent for about seven more years. She was finally set free around 1314, possibly in exchange for English noblemen captured after the Battle of Bannockburn (23 June – 24 June 1314).

    Marriage and death
    Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland distinguished himself in the battle and was rewarded the hand of the adolescent princess. Her dowry included the Barony of Bathgate in West Lothian. The original site of Bathgate Castle, which was part of the dowry, can be found on the grounds of Bathgate Golf Club. The site is protected by the Historic Scotland organisation and the Club is debarred from carrying out any excavation work on the site without prior permission. Every year on the first Saturday of June, the town of Bathgate celebrates the marriage of Marjorie and Walter in their annual historical pageant, just before the town's procession and Newland festival. Local school children are given the parts of Marjorie, Walter and other members of the court. After the pageant, everyone joins the procession along with Robert the Bruce on horseback.
    Two years later, on 2 March 1316, Marjorie was riding in Gallowhill, Paisley, Renfrewshire while heavily pregnant. Her horse was suddenly startled and threw her to the ground at a place called "The Knock." She went into premature labour and delivered the child at Paisley Abbey, surviving the birth by a few hours at most.

    She was nineteen at the time of her death, like her mother, who was also nineteen years old when she died in childbirth.

    At the junction of Renfrew Road and Dundonald Road in Paisley, a cairn marks the spot near to where Marjorie reputedly fell from her horse. While the reputed place of her death is now referred to as Knockhill Road, with nearby roads of Bruce Way, and Marjorie Drive named in her honour. She is buried at Paisley Abbey.

    Her son succeeded his childless uncle David II of Scotland in 1371 as King Robert II. Her descendants include the House of Stuart and all their successors on the throne of Scotland, England and the United Kingdom.4

Family: Walter Stewart 6th High Steward b. 1292, d. 9 Apr 1327

  • Last Edited: 9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102097
  2. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102096
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjorie_Bruce

Robert II Stewart King of the Scots

M, #3387, b. 2 March 1316, d. 19 April 1390

Robert II Stewart, King of Scots

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Robert was born on 2 March 1316 in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.1,2
  • Marriage*: He married Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan, daughter of Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan, 2nd Baron and Janet Mure of Polkelly, on 22 November 1347 in by Papal dispensation, Scotland.2
  • Marriage*: Robert II Stewart King of the Scots married Eupheme de Ross Countess of Moray, Queen Consort of the Scots, daughter of Hugh de Ross 4th Earl of Ross and Margaret Graham, on 2 May 1355 in Scotland; He married by Papal dispensation.3
  • Death*: Robert died on 19 April 1390 in Dundonald Castle, Ayreshire, Scotland, at age 74.1,2
  • Burial*: He was buried after 19 April 1390 in Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.2
  • Biography*: He succeeded to the title of 7th High Steward of Scotland on 9 April 1327. He fought in the Battle of Halidon Hill on 19 July 1333 at Halidon Hill, Scotland, where he was in command. He held the office of Regent of Scotland between 1338 and 1341.

    He was created 1st Earl of Atholl [Scotland] on 16 February 1341/42. He held the office of Regent of Scotland between 1346 and 1357. He fought in the Battle of Durham on 17 October 1346. He was created 1st Earl of Strathearn [Scotland] in 1358. He abdicated as Earl of Atholl on 31 May 1367. He abdicated as Earl of Strathearn on 18 April 1369. He gained the title of Earl of Strathearn on 4 April 1370. He succeeded to the title of King Robert II of Scotland on 22 February 1371. He was crowned King of Scotland on 26 March 1371 at Scone Abbey, Scone, Perthshire, Scotland.

    Before his accession, he had been successively joint and sole regent in David II's absence. During his reign, from 1384, his two sons were the real rulers for their unmilitary father.

    Robert II (early 1316 – 19 April 1390) became King of Scots in 1371 as the first monarch of the House of Stewart. He was the son of Walter Stewart, hereditary High Steward of Scotland and of Marjorie Bruce, daughter of Robert I and of his first wife Isabella of Mar.

    Edward Bruce, Robert I's brother, was named heir ahead of Marjorie but he died without issue on 3 December 1318 in a battle near Dundalk in Ireland. Marjory by this time had died in a riding accident probably in 1317. Parliament decreed that her infant son, Robert Stewart, was to be heir presumptive but this lapsed on 5 March 1324 on the birth of a son, David, to King Robert. Robert Stewart inherited the title of High Steward of Scotland on his father's death on 9 April 1326, and a Parliament held in July 1326 confirmed the young Steward as heir should Prince David die without a successor. In 1329 the king died and the six year-old David succeeded to the throne with Sir Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray appointed Guardian of Scotland. Robert Stewart was placed into the care of his uncle Sir James Stewart of Durrisdeer.

    Edward Balliol, son of King John Balliol, assisted by the English and Scottish nobles disinherited by Robert I, invaded Scotland inflicting heavy defeats on the Bruce party on 11 August 1332 at Dupplin Moor and then again at Halidon Hill on 10 July 1333. Robert fought at Halidon, where his uncle and former guardian, Sir James Stewart, was killed. Following this battle, Balliol gave Robert's lands in the west to his supporter David Strathbogie, the titular Earl of Atholl. Robert took refuge in the fortress of Dumbarton Castle in the Clyde estuary to join his uncle, King David. In May 1334 David escaped to France leaving Robert and John Randolph, Earl of Moray as joint Guardians of the kingdom. Robert succeeded in regaining his lands but following Randolph's capture by the English in July 1335, his possessions were once again targeted by the forces of Balliol and King Edward of EnglandThis may have persuaded Robert to submit to Balliol and the English king and may explain his removal as Guardian by September 1335. The Guardianship transferred to Sir Andrew Murray of Bothwell but following his death in 1338 Robert was re-appointed and retained the office until King David returned from France in June 1341. Robert accompanied David into battle at Neville's Cross on 17 October 1346 but he and Patrick Dunbar, Earl of March escaped or fled the field and David was taken prisoner. In October 1357, the king was ransomed for 100,000 merks to be paid in installments over ten years.

    Robert married Elizabeth Mure c.1348, legitimising his four sons and five daughters. His subsequent marriage to Euphemia de Ross in 1355 produced two sons and two surviving daughters and provided the basis of a future dispute regarding the line of succession. Robert joined a rebellion against David in 1363, but submitted to him following a threat to his right of succession. In 1364 David presented a proposal to Parliament that would cancel the remaining ransom debt if it was agreed that a Plantagenet heir would inherit the Scottish throne should he die without issue. This was rejected and Robert succeeded to the throne at the age of 55 following David's unexpected death in 1371. England still controlled large sectors in the Lothians and in the border country and so King Robert allowed his southern earls to engage in conflicts in the English zones to regain their territories, halted trade with England and renewed treaties with France. By 1384 the Scots had re-taken most of the English occupied lands, but following the commencement of Anglo-French peace talks, Robert was reluctant to commit Scotland to all-out war and obtained Scotland's inclusion in the peace treaty. Following a virtual coup in 1384 he lost control of the country, first to his eldest son, John, Earl of Carrick, afterwards King Robert III, and then from 1388 to John's younger brother, Robert, Earl of Fife, afterwards the first Duke of Albany. Robert II died in Dundonald Castle in 1390 and was buried at Scone Abbey.1,2,4

Family 1: Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan b. c 1310, d. b 1355

  • Last Edited: 6 Sep 2017

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102097
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10532.htm#i105315
  4. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II_of_Scotland
  5. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10533.htm#i105321
  6. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10211.htm#i102101
  7. [S925] George Seaton, A History of the Family of Seton, page 33.
  8. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Stewart,_Earl_of_Buchan.
  9. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10808.htm#i108075
  10. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://thepeerage.com/p10247.htm#i102463
  11. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10532.htm#i105318
  12. [S746] Wikipedia, online http://Wikipedia.com, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Stewart,_Earl_of_Strathearn.
  13. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com.

Olaf Mac Somerled

M, #3388, b. before 1140

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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  • Birth*: Olaf was born before 1140.1
  • Last Edited: 14 Dec 2012

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

daughter Mac Somerled

F, #3389, b. circa 1200

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

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Family: Donald of Isla b. c 1180, d. 1289

  • Last Edited: 11 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.

Margaret Stewart

F, #3390, b. between 1348 and 1355

The ancestry chart of Archibald MacFarlane (ID # 34) is presented because he unites the ancestry of both his parents. If an individual appears more than once in Archibald's chart this indicates descent from the individual in more than one line. By clicking on the each instance (i.e. Ancestry of Archibald MacFarlane (#5)) each line of descent will be shown.

Please be patient until the page fully loads.

  • Last Edited: 29 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S217] Ronald Williams, The Lords of the Isles.
  2. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10210.htm#i102097
  3. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10531.htm#i105310
  4. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p10807.htm#i108062
  5. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 59.
  6. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, page 60.
  7. [S923] F. S. A., Scot. Alexander MacKenzie, History of the MacDonalds and Lords of the Isles, pages 60, 479.
  8. [S742] The Peerage, online thepeerage.com, http://www.thepeerage.com/p1553.htm#i15530